By on April 11, 2010

This little truck slays me. It’s just so damn cute and toy-like, my desire to take it home and put it in my playroom is mighty powerful. Have you ever seen anything like it before? I didn’t think so; I never had. But then it’s not exactly a US spec vehicle, not surprisingly, although how exactly these illegal aliens make it through the cracks and get licensed is beyond me. And it’s hardly the only one in town, along with the Nissan Pao. And they’re both almost the same color. Maybe that’s the key. Anyway, someone is fulfilling their desires for toys. Wish it was me.

You’re going to be spared a lengthy CC today, because I don’t really have a whole lot to go on, except that this baby truck is a pick up version of the Suzuki Jimny SJ 20/LJ80, which was the final iteration of the first Suzuki 4×4, which had its roots a a vehicle called the HopeStar ON360, that Suzuki bought in 1968. That became the Suzuki LJ10, the first of a long line of Suzuki mini-4x4s.

Those early Suzukis were built to the Japanese kei-car standards, and had a 360 cc 2-stroke twin. Eventually, larger two-strokes (539 cc) were on tap, but in 1977 a slightly enlarged SJ20 featured the first four stroke four cylinder engine, an 800cc unit with some 41 hp. That’s what’s likely in this truck.

[update:] This particular truck sports DoD stickers from 1979, which thanks to a TTAC reader the duke means it had a pass to be driven on the base, and not that it was actually owned by the military. Although it certainly would have made a perfect parts runner on an Air Force base or the like.

The little LJ two stroke Suzukis were quite fondly adopted as little off-road toys in Germany, introducing a low-cost option to getting the tires dirty in that country. And of course, the “baby Jeep” has become almost a global icon, being produced in other countries and in various configurations. We of course are familiar with the later Samurai versions, but the Suzuki had spread the LJ and SJ around the world before it finally found a home here in the land of the the one and only Jeep. Perhaps coincidence or not, but our CC Outtake on the Samurai was shot exactly here across the street.

The whole family of these little Suzukis are extremely simple but durable and tough little work horses. I would love to have this one as a hardware store parts runner. Someone beat me to it, and it regularly appears around town. But for best effect, it is seen here with this little Isuzu/Chevy LUV pickup, which really helps put its size (and cuteness) in perspective.

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44 Comments on “Curbside Classic: 1979 Suzuki Jimny (LJ80/SJ20) Pickup...”


  • avatar
    Uncle Mellow

    How is it street-legal without a front licence plate ?

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      To the greater question, it technically doesn’t have a DoT sticker saying it meets FMVSS on it so it ain’t legal. It was never officially imported and has gotten a plate by slipping through the cracks.

      Thankfully, tech hasn’t completely closed the door for plating cars of dubious “legality” – but I fear those days are rapidly disappearing.

      Sad, because with a little creativity, a semi-average person can still get a black-market ride on the road. And that makes the world far more interesting.

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    From Oregon DMV

    A single license plate is issued to mopeds, motorcycles, trailers, campers, antique vehicles, and special interest vehicles, while two license plates are issued to all other types of vehicles registered by DMV, including passenger vehicles and trucks (See ORS 803.525).

    If only one license plate is issued, it must be displayed on the rear of the vehicle. If two plates are issued, one must be displayed on the front of the vehicle and the other on the rear of the vehicle. Plates must be in plain view so as to be easily read by the public and law enforcement (See ORS 803.540).

    License plates may not be altered and must not be covered by any material that alters their appearance. Furthermore, plate frames or holders must not prevent the numbers, letters, or stickers from being readable (See ORS 803.550 for more information).

  • avatar
    paul_y

    It’s so cute! I’d love to just drive this around, waving at people, maybe with some bicycle parts in the bed just for effect.

  • avatar

    Great find. I’ve only seen one that early and it was an SUV not pickup. Had the two stroke engine as well. This was in Canada but not sure if or how many where sold new here.

  • avatar

    Hey, that’s my old Chevy LUV, complete with mismatched, oxidized red paint! I salvaged a second bed before the local LUV parts source was euthanized, and mine had a siderail box instead of that rack system, but otherwise, that’s it. The LUV was a surprisingly capable hauler, very durable, and nearly unstoppable with proper all-terrain tires. I can’t believe how little rust is showing on both the LUV and SJ20; quite a double find, Paul.

    My current trucklet, a Subaru Baja, is more refined than either the LUV or SJ20, but it’s relatively heavy, and it lacks a two-speed transfer case or much of a bed. I’d sure like to see Hyundai or Suzuki (I think Subaru still feels pain from poor Baja sales) deliver a small, stripper, two-speed transfer case 4WD truck or SUV in the U.S. With CAFE targets moving, I think the market is there for a +30 mpg trucklet with some off-road abilities. Chrysler could pull off a win with a Jeep variant along those lines, but I doubt they’re in a position to do it first.

  • avatar
    1600 MKII

    It’s hard to think of this pup as cute after seeing African Revolutionaries blasting around in them with four or five AK laden coked up maniacs in the bed….

  • avatar
    educatordan

    That sucker so looks like if the original drive train crapped out you could drop the whole thing on a Samurai chassis.

  • avatar
    OM617

    Neat truck!

    Paul, I know it soon after the w123 review, and my interest is obvious, but that Gen I w126 in the 5th photo would make another great CC

  • avatar
    the duke

    My dad worked at the Portland Air National Guard (PANG) base (as a civilian, but he pulled guard duties) when I grew up. Many a time I got to visit flight line, look at the F-4s and later F-15s (man were they loud to a little kid!).

    My point in this is that there wasn’t a vehicle in our home that didn’t have one of these DOD stickers on the front bumper (later on the windshield as the regs changed)as my dad needed to be able to take any of our cars to work. The sticker helped the base guard identify a vehicle – you had to have a govt. id and a registered car to get on the base. So this truck was most likely owned by someone who worked on a military base, not the military itself.

    And, I want this truck, now.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Thanks for the clarification. In retrospect, that makes more sense. If it had been a military base vehicle, there would likely have been more evidence. I’ve corrected the text.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      I would offer perhaps the truth is a combo platter.

      the duke is correct about the nature of the stickers – I’ve had a few ex-mil personnel cars and they all have those stickers. He is 100% spot-on about the nature and purpose of those adhesive annoyances.

      I would offer that vehicles like that little Suzy seem to arrive via the magic of ‘laws don’t apply to the US Govt.’.

      If one were to peruse say, govliquidation.com one would find a plethora of Mitsus, Toyos and Suzis that are ex-mil and definitley not available through legit sales channels, in the USA.

      A regular citizen could never legally import one, but of course, our gov’t is above the law.

    • 0 avatar
      BuzzDog

      A regular citizen could never legally import one, but of course, our gov’t is above the law.

      I won’t comment as to whether or not our government is above the law, but I do know that there are indeed ways to legally own and operate these vehicles in the United States.

      The most obvious answer is that the vehicles were purchased for limited, on-base use with no intention of using the vehicles on public roads or highways. That’s the way that many Daihatsu Hijets and other kei-class vehicles get into the U.S., and it’s perfectly legal as long as the vehicle remains on private property or within the confines of a campus or military base. In fact, I’ve seen these vehicles at universities and on the campuses of major companies, but there is usually some indication on the vehicle that it is for off-road use only, and as such it does not bear license plates.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      ‘Natch you can use one on private property, but what fun is that?

    • 0 avatar
      BuzzDog

      ‘Natch you can use one on private property, but what fun is that?

      It wouldn’t be much fun for me, but then, I don’t hunt or use a vehicle to explore the great outdoors.

      Here in the South, there are hunters who use the 4WD versions instead of ATVs. Kei trucks can carry more, some feel they’re safer, and the price of a low-mileage used one is typically lower than that of an ATV. In addition, 15 states allow limited on-road use, much like neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs).

    • 0 avatar
      Billy Rockfish

      Duke – good comments and being a retired Coast Guardsman serving from 1979 to 2009 here’s the ‘hot skinny’ on these Suzuki Jimny pickups and pre-Samurai 4x4s. These vehicles were U.S. EPA certified vehicles that were, at the time, sold in Guam (distributed by Atkins-Kroll), Hawaii (distributed by SERVCO Pacific), the other Micronesian/Federated States of Micronesia and Puerto Rico. Being that these were states (Hawaii), and U.S. territories (Guam) or Commonwealths under U.S. protectorate(s), etc. these cars had to be (and were) Federally Certified for U.S. Sale. As to why these cars were not sold on the U.S. mainland or even the West Coast (lower 48 as I believe limited numbers were sold in Alaska) was the distribution arm(s) of the Suzukis. It wasn’t in place and wouldn’t be until the Samurai, which, with a larger four-cylinder engine would be better suited to Mainland U.S. or Lower 48 freeways. Anyone who has traveled the H-1 in Hawaii whether it was 1979 or 2010 will know that piddling along at 50mph is perfectly acceptable.

      I bought my first new car from Service Motor Co. in Wahiawa, Hawaii (a 1980 Toyota Tercel stripper that I had to wait 45 days for!) and there was a Suzuki Jimny pickup in the showroom. A display “not for sale” as there was a waiting list for these trucks. As spartan as they were they cost more than the ’80 Tercel 2 door 4-spd sedan, about $5500.00 plus at the time. SERVCO in Hawaii used to use this real sticky tar-like Quaker State rust protectant, so you could be guaranteed that at least, for 3-5 years, the truck wouldn’t disintegrate in the salt air. I thought it was a neat little truck, but went with the Tercel instead.

      I was stationed in Guam between 1990-1993, and there were still a few of these late 70s/early 80s Jimnys still running, but Guam, being more humid than Hawaii, it was guaranteed that these were swiss cheese with frames ready to split in half.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    The Jimny is still made in Japan, and they have some nice smaller-than-cuv versions that might just sell well here. They could fill the gap left by the expanding Grand Vitara.

    Being left hand drive, this one probably is from Europe, where the Jimny is also sold. If it were right-hand drive, it would be part of the import business for 15+ year old Japanese vehicles.

  • avatar
    mdwheary

    Where does one find parts to maintain these oddities of the motor kingdom?

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Praise be to the great gods Fedex, UPS, and Internet.
      If it was ever made, and still available, it can be on your doorstep in a week. Or less.

      If not, the magic of G-Code can reproduce a Bugatti down to the .001 inch.

      If you are really a fan of (fill in the obtuse vehicle that makes you smile,drool, or both, here) you can keep it going.

      If one has the funds, and the desire, one could (theoretically of course) import an entire car – in pieces. Once assembled, there’s still a few ways to get it “on the books”. (Of course, that would be illegal, and I would never suggest for a moment that anyone would import a really cool, never imported, car in contravention of the law.) Ever.

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    I second this. The USAF-R colonel next store had these stickers on his cars … this was a 3M Scotchlite material that reflected back to the light source … I was only 8 or so at the time I noticed that, but IIRC, this was not yet in wide-use for stop, street or highway signage at the time. IIRC, there were different kinds of stickers depending on whether or not the vehicle was registered to a civilian, an enlisted man, or an officer.

    p.s. I’ve long wondered if these are still in use … here in Europe, in S. Germanay, for instance, on can see US military cars crusing around with very obvious plates, if not US-made vehicles, which blatently flagged them as Yanks … I always wondered if, in this day and age of Al-Quida, whether it was wise to stick out like such a sore thumb.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      In the 70s, the US-issued plates in Europe (at least Germany) were a nice, bright green! You could see them for miles. Later, in the 80s and 90s, they started issueing plates that progressively looked more and more like the standard-issue German plates. Now, all plates are actually issued through the German vehicle registration process, so if a soldier in Kaiserslautern registers his POV, it comes with plates that start with KA. Of course, when those same “KA” plates are seen on a Hummer H3, it’s usually a pretty good guess that the owner is American, despite the German-issue plates!

      And folks that sell their vehicles that are registered to a military base are supposed to remove the decals! Of course, the Air Force got smart and recently did away with the base decals (at least Stateside)…Army hasn’t yet committed to that.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    In the late 70s through early 80s, some small importer managed to get Suzuki’s small trucks certified for sale and licensing in Hawai’i and Alaska; you’ll occasionally find the LHD LJ80s fitted with a small plaque warning against use outside of those 2 states as confirmation of its unique status. While they served admirably well and were popular out of all proportion to their limited import numbers, few of them have survived to this day in the tropical state as the ravages of ocean air and island mud and sand really tore into their thin steel shells. However, you’ll occasionally find a very well preserved example motoring around one of the more rural locales, including the full hardtop 4 seat version, which has become the rarest of the rare.

    I enjoyed the use of one for a week on O’ahu in the mid 80s as a loaner from a sibling living in Hale’iwa; it had a top speed of somewhere under 60 mph and could easily move out from a stop in 3rd gear without lugging the engine or lots of clutch slippage, and the engine would be good for a speed of just over 40 mph before I needed to switch to 4th gear. I’m guessing fuel economy was somewhere in the high 40s; I only filled the tank once that entire week, even as I buzzed all over the island.

    It was my experience with that LJ80 which turned me into an early evangelist for the Suzuki Samurai when it was first introduced in 50-state trim (“get yours while it’s still hard to get!”), although comparing a new Samurai to its LJ80 forefather would be akin to comparing today’s 3rd-gen Subaru Forester to that same Samurai.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    A regular citizen could never legally import one, but of course, our gov’t is above the law.

    You know, the government can also operate F16s with weapons on board, launch cruise missiles, and build nuclear bombs. Last time I checked, all of those things were illegal for regular citizens to do, too, but your big beef is that they got to have a ’79 Suzuki Jimmy?

    • 0 avatar
      xyzzy

      Best comment of the day, this one gave me a good chuckle.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Apples and oranges, but I’ll bite…

      The rationale for the average American not having the legal ability to choose to drive such vehicles is that they don’t meet the standards of safety and/or emissions control that our bureaucrats have seen fit to put in place.

      I’m not arguing the right or wrongness of said restrictions.

      We can rather readily separate the rationale for restricting access to weapons of war from a means of driving down to the grocery store.

      (Though there are plenty of jets, tanks, and a myriad of destructive devices in the hands of private parties in our country.)

      But, back to my meta point of that little throw-away…

      If we are dealing with something that requires the average person to obey a law, then we believe the average gov’t employee and purchasing agent must obey that law.

      Unless a cop is rolling code, he is required by law to obey the prima facie speed limit. Just like the rest of us. There is a limited granting of authority to exceed the law for a good reason – human nature.

      We have granted the government the authority to control certain things for a reason. But if there is no compelling public interest, if the government doesn’t follow it’s own rules, it fosters an environment that creates a second type of citizen, one that is not bound by the same laws as the regular Joe.

      That is not what the Framers had in mind.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      (Though there are plenty of jets, tanks, and a myriad of destructive devices in the hands of private parties in our country.)

      That’s why I specified ‘weapons on board’. I’m pretty sure that even if you can get your grubby mitts on an F16, loadin’ ‘er up with AIM 9s to go deer hunting is still verboten.

      At any rate, my reading of this is that if the vehicle was used on-base, there’s a reasonable rationale for its use assuming it filled a niche other cars didn’t – which it sounds like might be the case.

      If, on the other hand, someone used his status to get it licensed for regular road use, it’s kind of a different story.

      I’m generally left of center with a libertarian streak, but I tend to lean toward lenience in my position vs. the army. Everyone I’ve met in the service has been great to work with, and aside from the use of absurd terms like ‘warfighters’ seem in general to have their heads on straight.

      Aside from issues of civil liberties and direct relations with civilians, I’m inclined to let the military do what needs to be done to execute the mission. Their job is to do it; the civilian government’s job is to tell them what to do. When it comes down to it, the military *is* above the law in certain respects, and while it has to be handled carefully, I don’t know that it’s a bad situation.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      “That’s why I specified ‘weapons on board’. I’m pretty sure that even if you can get your grubby mitts on an F16, loadin’ ‘er up with AIM 9s to go deer hunting is still verboten.”

      I think it’s still legal in AK and AZ but I’ll check…. (I kid, I kid….) Besides, even one round from the Vulcan is going to take a lot of venison. An Aim-9? What kind of horrible things have the deer done to you?

      I’m not anti-military by any stretch, and have no desire to deprive the armed forces of what’s necessary to do their job. And yes, it’s cheaper to have a bunch of guys running around an AFB in one of these versus a full size vehicle.

      I doubt whomever owns the vehicle had to do much beyond shuffle a couple of slightly dubious papers to get it licensed. Doesn’t take any real influence, just a knowledge of some flexible areas of motor vehicle law, and maybe a few extra bucks for paperwork shuffling.

      My throw away on the government being above the law was merely related to the fact that the general public has to get such vehicles through back channels and sneak them onto the road.
      However, I’ve seen them running around off-base with G-plates on them on several occasions.

      Perhaps just some of the boys being bad and plate slapping ‘em to go putz around, but I sincerely doubt it.

  • avatar
    Billy Bobb 2

    I’d bet this little truck came thru Hawaii; the Suzuki distributor there to this day is independent of “American Suzuki”.

    • 0 avatar
      MM

      Same same of the Subaru dealer in Honolulu… was ‘independent of Subaru of America’ in 2005 when I tried to use Subie MasterCard rebate points toward a new Legacy. Fortunately, called Subaru of America HQ, was able to speak direct to a VP of Marketing (!! that would NEVER happen at GM) and they swapped my points for a check.

  • avatar
    MM

    Paul, truly enjoy the CC series… brilliant fun, and makes one think of how many other Eugene-like hamlets are out there?

  • avatar
    zbnutcase

    Just how does one get something like this licensed? Couple weeks ago I saw one of the tiny cabover Suzuki 4×4 pickups (like you see@the sportsman show, some guy out of Tillamook imports and sells them)goin down NE122nd with Oregon plates! You would think there would be something in the VIN that says NOT LEGAL as soon as DMV types it in. Any DMV employees want to chime in? Oh, wait, I live in Oregon…the state that will take your money regardless to give it to people who break the law. Sleepy Ted thanks us all.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    It could very well be that the DOD sticker is the clue as to how this little gem made it to the US. It was not uncommon when I was in the service to ship your car (if your rank allowed you to do so) to an overseas assignment, sell the car and ship back another purchased in country in its place. At my last stateside assignment a Master Sargeant’s daily driver was a right hand drive Fairlady.

    • 0 avatar
      fincar1

      I might add that this driver is technically in violation of the two-plate rule since the vehicle only shows a rear plate. However, this law (which is also the case in Washington) is not all that strictly enforced, and I see vehicles in both states fairly often that don’t carry a front plate.

      This little rig with its tires that are so large compared to the vehicle size looks to me like you could have fun with it just about anywhere, and that it’d climb anything the tires would stick to. On the woods trails in western WA and OR, narrowness is a significant advantage.

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    Getting a 1979 model into the US wouldn’t actually be that hard. Since the late 90s the NHTSA and EPA regs give a free pass to anything over 25 years old so this Jimny could have been legally imported any time after 2004 and it’s old enough to have been a legal pre 1990 grey market vehicle as well.
    Canada has a similar exemption except that theirs starts at 15 years old so all kinds of older JDM stuff and Land Rovers are rolling around British Columbia and occasionally sneaking over the border since it fairly simple to drive over the border and get a plate.

    • 0 avatar
      educatordan

      That’s very true, one of the car mags I was occasionally picking up would run a monthly feature on some car that was ultra-cool, never sold in the US and eligible to be brought in. It was usually a European or Japanese car that was some kind of racing homogenization special.

  • avatar
    400 N

    I owned an 1982 LJ jeep version with the 800cc engine for 4 years, and it was indeed the greatest offroad experience I’ve ever had. Based in Vancouver BC, I frequently took it up to the mountains for climbing and backcountry skiing. With 15″ wheels and narrow width, it could get up most logging roads, even narrow tracks, and with the low weight it could actually drive on top of snow crust.

    By reputation they were developed for the likes of the Japanese forestry services, and it was definitely happy in the backwoods. I sold for $500 when I went to Saudi Arabia, and I feel like I had betrayed a friend.

    As for safety, well, those were simpler times. However I was rear-ended once by a rusty Ford Econoline which resulted in considerable damage to his bumper and a mere paint scratch to me. It seemed quite stable, and with a maximum speed of 80km, it was hard to get into trouble.

    The truck was imported into Canada in small numbers, and predated the Suzuki samurai. Japanese Kei cars are still being imported, by virtue of a loophole in Canadian laws which allows vehicles over 15 years to be imported. (google “Kei King” or “Japanoids”)

    The pickup version version recalls the Toyota Landcruiser pickup, which is itself a classic. I’ve also owned the Landcruiser jeep, which is also an awesome vehicle, but somehow lacked the sheer spunkiness of the Suzuki.

    • 0 avatar

      @ 400 N:

      I think the advantages of light weight are often extolled by roadies, but forgotten by off-roaders. In my experience, about the only thing that’ll stop one of these capable lightweights in mud or snow is getting high centered. Sure, they may not be the best rock crawlers in stock form (not much is), but for general backcountry use, they excel, and they’re very efficient all around.

      As the side-by-side ATV market develops, and the traditional truck/SUV market continues to be squeezed for more efficiency, some of these gems may succeed in the U.S. I’d definitely consider a modern, relatively light weight 4WD along the lines of the Jimny for a daily driver and trailhead transport. If Smart can sell, you’d think something like the Jimny has a place here, too.

  • avatar
    Oregon Sage

    I used to work at a public University where we had a small fleet of DOT off road only micro vans, and they were bought with that intent. However some of the streets on campus were public streets and the state DMV insisted that we plate them, so we did.

    Once plated it is no big trick to keep renewing. This used to be common with off-road motorcycles but now states keep lists of legal models and it is becoming virtually impossible to register a bike that was not originally sold for street duty, even if fitted with all the required street equipment.

  • avatar
    letanon

    Those little Suzukis where sold legally to civilians here in Puerto Rico. New cars sold here must conform with all of the US Federal Government vehicle laws. So they must have conformed with federal regulations somehow or the Federal Government doesn’t care so much about what is sold on USA territories. In fact, I have seen here cars that are supposedly for the Canadian market sold legally here. Like for example my first car which I inherited from my dad, a 1987 Nissan Sentra Honeybee. That was a B11 model (1982-1986)that was imported from Mexico and sold as a completely stripper, low cost car, along side the B12 model (1987 – 1991). Those where sold until about 1989. Those cars had the plate that said that they conformed to all of the Federal Government regulations in force for that model year. We also got Pontiac Fireflys (Metro,Swift clone) and other “Canadian” cars. So different laws seems to apply to different parts of the USA and its territories.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Right or wrong, PR ain’t a State. As such, many things transpire there that would get even the monied in trouble in the Lower 48.

      I assume you live there, and have figured out that while the law may say that it ‘must comply to US regs’, the facts on the ground are a bit different.

      (At least when I used to visit in the mid/late 80s.)

    • 0 avatar
      letanon

      Yes, I was born and currently live here in PR. You are right that we are not a state, but at least regarding new cars sold here, if they don’t comply with Federal regulations, the cannot be sold here (airbags, emissions systems, lighting, etc). If the model or brand cease to be sold in the USA, it cease to be sold here as well. At my father in law house, there is an owner’s manual from an old Suzuki SJ410 (Samurai predecessor), and the manual says that the vehicle conforms to all of the Federal regulations in effect for that year (1984 I think), but that the vehicle couldn’t be used or sold on the mainland, because there were not any authorized Suzuki dealers there for parts and service. So basically if you took that car over there an it broke down, you where screwed. I think that is the same with Guam, the US Virgin Island and other territories as well.

      As for importing cars that are not legally sold in USA, we are supposed to follow the same rules and regulations from the mainland. And MOST of the time that is enforced, not always, but MOST of the time.

      In fact, one of the Chinese companies that are supposed to begin selling cars in USA, Geely, was going to use PR as a testing place for the cars after they passed all of the required certifications and testings from the government, (EPA, DOT, etc). But that didn’t happen. So although we are not a state, we at least are useful as guinea pigs for testing cars of doubtful reputation. ;o)

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      @letanon,

      BTW, ‘Tis a shame that PR doesn’t have Statehood, as it is frequently shortchanged due to it’s status. Sorta like the District of Columbia.

      A couple of guys I went to school with in the US were from PR, as such I did a few spring breaks and holidays enjoying the island. Gorgeous place, and great people, wonderful food. Wish I had the time and spare money to visit more often.

      I’ve considered relocating there more than once.

      My friend’s family was one of the very monied types, so perhaps I have a skewed view of what one can get away with if you have the right friends.

      I know technically that US regs must to be followed, I just remember that the rules were a little more flexible for certain folks.


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