By on April 6, 2009

[Written by TTAC commentator FreedMike] Much to the annoyance of the local BMW and Infiniti dealers, I’ve been shopping these two cars. But, hey, it’s MY 40 large, not YOURS. So I’ll be picky if I wanna be). By now, I’m VERY familiar with the two machines. I don’t know why TTAC’s comparison was between the 324-hp G37 and a 328 that gives up about 100 hp. The G37 will eat the 328 for lunch. The real comparison is between the G37 and the 335.

From the outside, both cars look great, with the Infiniti wearing sleeker duds. The BMW has that classic 3-Series proportioning that wears so well over time. Either car makes a strong style statement, so you can chalk this one up to personal preference.

The Bimmer’s interior boasts a slightly higher-quality tactile feel, while the Infiniti’s cabin offers more impressive styling (particularly if you nix the aluminum trim for African rosewood). The Infiniti has an LCD display mounted high on the dashboard that displays the radio, climate controls and (optional) navigation. When equipped with navigation, the BMW’s high-mounted LCD display looks like it’s been lumped on top of the dashboard as an afterthought.

The BMW 335’s lower ride height makes ingress and egress harder. Once inside, both the Infiniti and BMW offer supportive chairs (sports seats optional). The Infiniti G37 rides slightly higher so there is actual foot room in back; if you sit low in the BMW, your back seat passengers will have NO foot room whatsoever.

The 335’s twin turbo motor is an absolute gem: eager off the line, strong throughout the power band and wonderful to listen to at any speed. The G37’s naturally aspirated V-6 is similarly strong, if a bit more throaty and assertive-sounding; think of the G37 as espresso and the 335 as frappé.

Both cars have well-sorted automatic transmissions with a manual shift feature. The G37’s new seven-speed transmission offers more cogs, The sport model’s paddle shifters are finely crafted in magnesium, with a grippy rubber backing. They’re big and easy to reach from the wheel, and operate with a marvelously precise feel. The BMW’s paddle shift system works well, but I found myself using the Infiniti’s paddles more often.

In terms of driving dynamics, the BMW is near perfect, but the Infiniti’s not far off. If you don’t drive on the knife-edge of adhesion, you won’t feel much of a difference. But it’s there.

The 335 is the more refined ride, but not by much. It’s also subjectively quicker. In reality, the two cars are about evenly matched. Both are highly capable back-road maulers, with accurate steering, strong brakes and solid structures. The BMW’s almost telepathic steering gives it an edge over the Infiniti in this category. Anyone who drives at less than nine-tenths won’t notice much of a difference.

The BMW is the better car, but the differences are subjective and very subtle. And the superiority comes at a price.

A loaded G37X with the sport package runs $42 grand. A similarly equipped 335Xi (navigation, leather, top-notch sound system, etc) is $52 grand. You can get a base 335 for the same price as the G37, but it comes with a tinny-sounding sound system with the world’s worst display (it’s cryptic, with a cheap-looking red LCD display that disappears completely if you wear polarized sunglasses).

I can live without navigation, but other equipment choices are harder to justify at a matching price point, such as the manual steering wheel adjuster (as opposed to the Infiniti’s electrically-adjusted steering column, which glides up and out of the way when you get out of the car). The Bimmer’s iPod interface is a $450 option—a standard feature on an $18K Toyota Corolla.

But the hardest cheap-out to justify on the base 335: the drab-looking vinyl seats, which offer neither heating nor lumbar support, and emit a nasty chemical odor to boot. The effect is far more pronounced on cars with tan interiors. Even the charcoal vinyl interior, which does a decent leather imitation, has a nasty smell. How BMW has the chutzpah to charge over $40K for a car with vinyl seats is beyond me.

Still, the 335 offers a sublime driving experience, and the cachet of the roundel. The Infiniti offers a more a more strongly-flavored (some would say less refined) drive. Subjectively, it’s not quite up to the standard of the BMW.

Removing price from the equation, the BMW wins. However, given the price difference between similarly equipped models, the Infiniti triumphs, particularly against the out-muscled 328. That’s doubly true if you value the latest and greatest gizmos: standard in the Infiniti for the same money as a base 3-Series.

Overall, I’d give the nod to the Infiniti G37 over the BMW 335 based on superior value. And unless you’re a die-hard BMW fan, the G37’s a no-brainer over the 328.

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85 Comments on “Comparo, Take Two: Infiniti G37 vs. BMW 335...”


  • avatar

    Been there, done that.

    BMW prices a loss leader. It’s about $2 less than the competition. This is so they can advertise it.

    The Competition is usually well equipped as the writer states. The BMW is strippo.

    Even if you try to get the BMW, reasoning that you can live without I-drive or the $500 ipod hookup (really !), you run straight into the options packaging. Want sport seats ? Requires Leather. (+2500) Most of the packages have one thing you want (seat heaters) and five you don’t (built in garage door openers, sunroof). By the time you get done making equal cars, you are 10-15k higher than the competition-and the Japanese do electronics better anyway.

    It was the same for two cars, but I came down both sides. For the car, I decided the 3 series was worth the money. For the family truck, the X class was just rudely overpriced, and the six underpowered, so Acura’s MDX was a better choice. The X was worse than the 3-er, as the bump up to the V8 was quite a bit more than the 3-er bump up to the bigger engine. The 328 is not slow, but the 335 is faster. The x5 with the six is SLOW, which is pathetic for a car costing what it does.

    If you keep your cars, I can report that the BMW, at least in my driveway, is nearly bulletproof.

  • avatar
    vento97

    Both cars are quite pricey:

    BMW = “Break My Wallet”
    Infiniti = “The amount of money flying out of your wallet”

    Both cars have way too many electronic gizmos for my use….

  • avatar
    gdd9000

    Agreed on the options issue with the 335. Once I realized that, I also realized there were other cars that were in the range of what I was going to have to spend. And with that, I ended up with an S5. One other thing you might want to think about, if it matters to you, is the image the car projects…and the Infiniti, BMW and Audi will each project something quite different.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    I saw the new, 2010, Buick LaCrosse parked next to a new BMW the other day, and boy, did it make that BMW look utterly dated. I can’t speak for the driving feel or performance, but the website says you can get the 280 hp V-6 in it, and AWD. GM’s been knocking-out some long balls in the park lately. Too bad about the name on this one, though.

  • avatar
    MattVA

    In regards to the steering wheel adjusting mechanism: You probably shouldn’t include this in you decision. I used to think auto vs. manual adjustment was important until I realized that I haven’t adjusted my steering wheel location in almost 2 years now. (This might also be because the only other driver, my wife, is only 2 inches shorter than me.)

    Anyway, I wouldn’t factor this into the final decision if I were you.

  • avatar
    JJ

    I would still go for the 328i, but then again, here in Europe different standards apply (and it would have to be a 325i or 330i), which in practise means the G37 would be compared to the 325/330i first of all, and the 335i is on another level.

    The extra 50-80HP (330i in Europe is rated at 272 metric HP, which is only slightly more than BHP) the G37 is going to give you over the normally aspirated BMW I6s, isn’t really going to be an issue because the 325/28/30 has more than enough grunt for the straight line stuff as well. Keep in mind that right here, you can have a 316/18/20 with I4s and the 320i is already considered a quick car (and on a side note, here in the Netherlands, it’s more expensive than a 335i in the US, so that messes with peoples perceptions of grunt a little).

    Yes, the G37 will be quicker of the line but who cares really. What is way more important for driving fun is how does the car handle through the corners. The 3-series has still got it covered in that area, whether you drive a lowly 316i or a 335i.

    On top of that there are the better interior materials, which is probably a more important selling point right here than in the US and the argument that the Infiniti would be more reliable is pretty much no selling point at all here, compared to (my impression) a big selling point in the US. I don’t know why this is the case but I’ve noticed before that the perception of reliability of certain brands vary hugely between the US and Europe.

    Finally, the G37′s engine is not quite on par with the 335i’s. Both are great engines but the 335 in reality has more power in a wider rev range.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    i would be more interested in the 328. I am less impressed by large engines. I prefer handling prowess.

  • avatar
    XCSC

    @MattVA,
    As I begin to read your reply I thought for sure you were going to complain about having to wait for the electric motor to do it’s thing on the steering wheel/column…but you threw me off.

    I can say that my wife’s next car WILL have some kind of memory function for the seat/mirrors at a minimum. We drive each other’s cars regularly and readjusting all the mirrors and seat is a big hassle in our eyes. My 2000 Passat has memory seat/mirrors but her no-longer-in-the-stable 2001 Audi A4 didn’t…and it had every option available – I don’t understand. I know a news A4 would have it now though. Of course it doesn’t relate directly to your commentary or the review but I thought it was relevant.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    MattVA – I can agree that I never moved my steering column in my previous 2006 A4 but what was not mentioned in the review is that the instrument panel in the G moves with the wheel…A huge point with 6′ plus drivers…The IP in the G is amongst the best I’ve ever owned (2008 G35xS)…

    JJ – The funny part is I’ve driven 335i’s at 9/10ths and 10/10ths at the track in Spartanburg several times – and the 335′s turbo lag (that “supposedly” doesn’t exist) is what sealed the deal for the G…Anyone who says the 335 has more “useable” torque across the entire range simply has not driven both cars in the same conditions…The G’s 3.5L (not to even mention the 22 extra ponies in the 3.7L) is a far more useable engine from idle to redline…

    Interiors – If – like me – you had an Audi before the G – the BMWs interior is simply second rate in ergos and most materials. Even compared to the A4, the G interior is much more bulletproof in day to day use…

  • avatar

    If the manual versions of both cars are driven, the edge definitely goes to the BMW. I was shopping both cars recently and the G37′s manual has never heard of the word refinement. The back of the 335 may be more cramped, but the front of the G37 was more cramped than the 335′s. That was surprising to me considering the G37 is bigger. The G37′s ride is also a bit harsher, despite the BMW’s run flats. I absolutely agree about the base vinyl seating in the BMW. At least give me some kind of cloth/alcantara option if it’s not going to have leather standard.

  • avatar

    Detroit-X: the LaCrosse won’t be in the same ballpark as the 3-Series in terms of driving feel. It’s a Lexus substitute.

  • avatar

    Excellent review, FreedMike. Just one minor correction: iPod integration isn’t even standard in the Lexus LS, much less a Corolla. You might be thinking of aux-in, but that doesn’t give you iPod integration.

    As mentioned in a comment on the Take One review, TrueDelta’s Car Reliability Survey actually indicates a lower repair rate for the BMW when both cars are very new. But if you compare older cars, the Infiniti will require fewer repairs, assuming that the current cars age like the older ones have. Of course, it’s possible that BMW has turned a corner, but it’s too soon to tell yet.

    Our latest results:

    http://www.truedelta.com/car-reliability.php

    Always looking for more participants. 43,000 cars signed up so far.

  • avatar

    I went through a similar comparison two years ago when it was the G35 vs 335/328. I preferred the Infiniti styling, as the “bangle-isms” on the 3-series sedan (moustached grille, goofy cut lines, Korean taillamps) drive me batty. Price had me leaning way to the Infiniti side, but when engine response was compared, BMW was on top. Also, the 3-series interior seems very, em, economical when compared to the G. In the end, however, the driving of the 3-series and the incredible pull of the turbo-motor made me pull another $8k from my wallet and buy the 335 complete with sport and premium packages. I’ve tracked the car several times and it is delightful. Frankly, I don’t find a whole lot of practical use for the 300 hp, and on the track it can get you going far faster than necessary to enjoy the experience, but it is a great deal of fun. If I had my druthers, it would be a 3-series sized, RWD car weighing in around 3200 lbs (or less) with 220 hp or so. I do find the Nissan V6 to be a little “thrummy” in the higher rev ranges, something which is not true about the inline six in the BMW.

    If you are buying an automatic, and plan to keep it, you might consider the fact that most old-line BMW mechanics are unenthusiastic about their auto transmissions. I’d guess the Infiniti transmission is more reliable, but have no data to back that up. Also, I’d expect an aging BMW to be more expensive to maintain than the Infiniti.

    Good choices, both!

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    Nowadays you have to factor in BMW’s free maintenance plan if you’re going to choose based on value. While I know it’s YOUR 40 large (lol) I’d definitely spring for the BMW. Such trivial things as navigation (can get a Garmin for 100 bucks nowadays) and iDrive don’t matter much to me and it’d be easier to price the 335 to within a couple thousand of the G37′s price.

    The BMW wins both dynamically and (when a 50,000 mile free maintenance plan is factored in) and value for the money.

    Give Infiniti props though…they’re closest to matching BMW’s onroad character.

  • avatar
    mxfive4

    Automatics? Really?

  • avatar
    andyinsdca

    Does the 335 come with those vile, horrible Bridgestone run-flats? If it does, I’m looking elsewhere…

  • avatar
    Vorenus

    Nice review, and great point on the value aspect.

    So many car reviews overlook the damn price difference, as if we’re all made of money.

  • avatar
    johnthacker

    I don’t know why TTAC’s comparison was between the 324-hp G37 and a 328 that gives up about 100 HP.

    Sure you do, as you point to it later on. Price. A G37 v. 328 comparison is an artificial but not without merit attempt to compare what you can get for the same amount of money from both.

    The situation with the 328i and 335i is almost exactly the reverse of that of the A4′s 2.0T I4 and 3.2 V6, at least to me. The 335i is a great car that has an obvious niche, but I feel that the 328i loses most comparisons. The A4 4-cylinder has a niche as well (best fuel economy and best performance among all the base-engine luxury cars), but the V6 is pretty much only if you’re in love with Audi and really want a nicer engine note.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Removing price from the equation, the BMW wins.

    No. The Ferrari Enzo wins.

  • avatar
    proteus

    The Infiniti sucks.

    Here’s the difference:

    When driving the Infiniti, it feels like you’re driving a car.

    When driving the BMW (328i or 335i with sports package), it feels like you’re one with the car.

    The G37 feels bloated and heavy around corners. It’s also gutless in lower rpms compared to the 335i.

    When you do BMW, European Delivery, the G37 and 335i price difference is a wash.

    Having said that, I would take a 328i over a G37 any day.

    My review qualifications:
    2007 E90 328i (sold)
    2009 E92 335i (current)

    G37:
    1 full week of seat time

  • avatar
    wsn

    A tip for potential buyers:

    When you hear people saying “a used A car is a better value than a new B car” or “A car is a better value than B car but you have to go to another continent to buy it“, you can be quite certain that A car is a piece of crap.

  • avatar
    Areitu

    proteus :
    April 6th, 2009 at 11:40 am

    I can’t help but point out the last sentence of the review:

    And unless you’re a die-hard BMW fan, the G37’s a no-brain winner over the 328.

    Snarkiness aside, I don’t think either car is crappy. I’m curious about the ED price, since I had considered an ED 135i. Do you remember the ED MSRP for a 335i equipped like the one in this review?

    Most people in this segment seem to lease cars anyway, which narrows the gap between the BMW and Infiniti even further.

    SupaMan :
    I doubt the Infiniti costs 10k to maintain for 4yr/50k miles…

  • avatar
    theslik1

    Supaman:
    BMW’s “free maintenance” is priced in; the program is the beancounter-designed absolute bare minimum to get a car through its lease period. Since I buy cars to keep I would end up paying a substantial sum for the actual maintenance required to ensure long-term reliability. At any rate, this can’t be assured with any modern Bimmer regardless of how much preventative work you have done.

    The BMW is therefore neither the best short-term nor long-term value if you’re going to keep the car. Not even close. If you intend on leasing it for 2-3 years and trading it in then it makes no difference; the next owner will eventually pick up your slack (in spades).

    It’s sad that the best built parts on a 335i are probably the two Mitsubishi turbochargers…

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Areitu: Good point on the maintenance costs…As noted earlier, I had the A4 in the last year of Audi’s full maintenance coverage…and yes, it was nice – but the Germans all use long, long service intervals and all German V6s have HUGE oil reservoirs (my 3.2 Audi took 8 quarts of 5W40 syn – which is rarely available for the same price as 5W30 syn)…

    The G on the other hand uses $4 Nissan (or Puro) oil filters, holds EXACTLY 5 quarts of 5W30 – $20 at WalMart for a name brand like Castrol full syn, air filters (need 2) for $28 a pair and change in 2 minutes with no tools – and a cabin filter is $15. If you are a true car guy and handle this yourself, the cost is minimal and even if you take it to the dealer, it nets out WELL BELOW the delta between a 3 and a G…

    I run the intervals at 7500 miles for the G but rotate tires at 5K and air & cabin filters at 15K vs 30K…Easy to work on and zero issues…Hard to beat when you realize you can still own it after the 4 years/60K bumper to bumper and not be haunted by the German electrical gremlins (German car guys – PLEASE do not deny these gremlins exist – I have lots of proof – and we own a 2006 VW Golf/Rabbit)

  • avatar
    Lee

    Possibly the most accurate review of these cars i have read.

  • avatar

    telepathic steering in the E90 BMW?

    has he driven an E30 or E36?? The E90 is numb in comparison.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    Could you swap the seats in a base 335i with Recaros? Or would such a swap conjure nasty Bavarian interior electrical gremlins? Or dealership hatred and retribution?

  • avatar
    Oliedog

    We own a 2007 G35X and looked at the BMW 335 prior to buying the G (we bought the G late in 2007 for 35.5k). I found the driving experience to be very similar and did not find the BMW 335 noticably faster (I test drove it twice – maybe I needed more time in the seat). Granted, I did not drvie it over 100mph where the 335 probably outpaces the G (the G acclerates slowly after 100, but then again, who really drives 100mph on a regular basis). But when we compared the interior, the options and the present and long-term value (we will drive it for 7 plus years), the 50K 335 did not even belong in the discussion. For 35K (our budget), we found the G to be head and shoulders above any other car. As a side note, if I was spending 50K and wanted something fast, why bother with a 335 BMW, when you can get a used (three years) 911C2 (with an extended warranty)?

  • avatar
    Tummy

    Whenever I see people driving these $40-$50k cars, I think they’re leased to low to mid-level corporate managers.

  • avatar

    I like the attractive looks of the Infiniti more than the BMW, but, if it came down to it, I’d perfer a C63 AMG.

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    BMW’s Run Flat Tires are a deal breaker for me; horrible driving dynamics, noisy as hell after 8K miles and shockingly expensive to replace.

  • avatar
    Mirko Reinhardt

    @JJ :
    I don’t know why this is the case but I’ve noticed before that the perception of reliability of certain brands vary hugely between the US and Europe.

    BMWs rank very highly in German reliability statistics. Auto Bild just finished the 100,000 km test of a 130i hatchback (they completely take them apart after the test), and it was only the second completely fault-free car in their whole history. (the othe one was a Mazda 6)
    My dad is on his 6th 5-series since 1991, and they have all been very good for the 300,000 km he usually keeps them.

    @ihatetrees :
    Could you swap the seats in a base 335i with Recaros? Or would such a swap conjure nasty Bavarian interior electrical gremlins? Or dealership hatred and retribution?

    Would work. BMW offers BMW-branded Recaro lightweight buckets through their “BMW Performance” program.
    In Europe, sports seats require only an optional higher-quality cloth. There is no vinyl in Euro BMWs. Base is cloth, cloth/leather is a 610€ option in the 3, M-Sport models come with very nice cloth/alcantara seats standard.
    In the 1-series, they have an optional cloth that is much nicer than the standard cloth. It costs the princely sum of 140€ and can be combined with sports seats. Cloth/leather seats are available for 540€ in the 1-series. In Orange. Who could pass on that?

  • avatar
    V6

    i hate the short trunk styling of the G37

    anyway, my pick would be manual 328i sedan.

    actually no, it would be an E46 325 or 330 manual

  • avatar
    Travis

    I don’t know why TTAC’s comparison was between the 324-hp G37 and a 328 that gives up about 100 hp.

    A loaded G37X with the sport package runs $42 grand. A similarly equipped 335Xi (navigation, leather, top-notch sound system, etc) is $52 grand.

    So you DO know?!

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    MXfive4 –

    I live in Colorado, and here, all-wheel-drive is a must. The G37X is available with an automatic only, so for fairness’ sake, I compared it to the automatic BMW.

    I think both gearboxes are brilliant, and I didn’t feel that I was giving up much by foregoing a manual with the sequential shift systems, and frankly, the Infiniti’s paddle shifters are marvelous – they look and feel great, and have a wonderfully positive action.

    However, for accuracy’s sake, I did sample a six-speed 335xi, and while it’s fun to shift for yourself, I found the BMW’s gearbox to be a bit wonky, with long throws. I also found the clutch’s travel to feel overly long. My dad had a ’80 730i back in the day, and the clutch had the same feel. Wasn’t bad, but not my cup of tea.

    I found myself preferring the automatic 335, believe it or not – with the AWD and sequential shift, you can do freakishly fast takeoffs.

    I used to be a die-hard manual gearbox guy, but hey, if Michael Schumacher’s F1 car had a slushbox… :)

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    MattVA –

    I’m a big guy, so ingress and egress on both of these cars is an important point. The Infiniti’s “powered” egress option, which automatically adjusts the seat back and down, and adjusts the wheel upwards, is a huge plus for me.

    Once inside, I actually found the BMW to be slightly more comfortable. Ah, well.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    blockquote cite=”Flashpoint :
    April 7th, 2009 at 12:00 am

    I like the attractive looks of the Infiniti more than the BMW, but, if it came down to it, I’d perfer a C63 AMG.”

    I haven’t driven one (70 large is just way outside my budget), but I did sample a Caddy CTS-V and it’s a BRILLIANT car.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    OK, update…so finally sold myself on the 335xi (yes, I know, the Infiniti was a no brainer, but in the end, I just liked the BMW better) and took the wife and kids to look at the one I picked out. Black metallic with caramel-colored Dakota leather. Be still my beating heart…

    …and nobody fits in back. Even my eight-year-old can’t put her feet below the seat.

    On to the Infiniti place, and same result, though the Infiniti is a little bit bigger inside.

    Looks like Mikey’s midlife crisis car will be a midsize sports sedan instead of a compact one…look for the comparo in days to come. While at the BMW and Infiniti dealers I sampled the 535xi and M35x, so away we go…

    (preview: if you thought the pricing on a 335 was seriously off, try a 535)

  • avatar

    FreedMike – I suspect you’re pretty tall. I was trying to find the smallest RWD car in which the rear seat was usable, and the 335 fit my needs and I am 5′-10″. The Infiniti does have more room and as I recall is about 10″ longer.

    Look at it this way – you still have a brilliant car and your daughter saved you a lot of money. She’ll be spending it real soon, now (ask me how I know), so enjoy it while it lasts. Best of luck with the G37!

  • avatar
    theslik1

    Mirko Reinhardt:
    BMWs rank very highly in German reliability statistics. Auto Bild just finished the 100,000 km test of a 130i hatchback (they completely take them apart after the test), and it was only the second completely fault-free car in their whole history. (the othe one was a Mazda 6)
    My dad is on his 6th 5-series since 1991, and they have all been very good for the 300,000 km he usually keeps them.

    I offered a too-generic rant on BMW’s reliability and should have made it clear I was specifically referencing NA-spec Bimmers. Your comment is perfectly valid for Euro-spec models. BMW markets very solid entry-level compacts (diesels FTW) in Europe that aren’t festooned with all the electronic gee-gaws that prove so problematic over here in the US.

  • avatar

    I know that BMW would sell you a cloth interior here in the US, but you have to know to ask, and to special order the car. You will never see it “on the lot”.

    I spend too much time in my car, and leather or nauga leather does not “breathe”.

    BMW cloth is a very strong microfiber showing almost no wear after five hard years. Banish those memories of ripped and sun-bleached GM seats.

    I don’t know if you still can, but if you are in the market and willing to wait, it’s a good deal.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Nothings cheap all expensive. Do I need all those buttons to control my car stereo or wipers?

    I noticed on the highway people with money,jobs and have nice cars are still driving around on Interstate 95 people with no jobs and no money are not driving at all.

    Before I won’t even notice the BMW and Infiniti but with lesser car on the road. They are more obvious. You guys always love the BMW. I rode the BMW it has nothing special about it.

    When your inside the car the only thing that you notice is that your inside a $35,000 BMW.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    I dropped off my FX45 this morning at the dealer and got a G35X loaner. Doesn’t feel at all “special” especially for how much it cost. The interior was pretty plain, black plastic everywhere.

    For the money and passenger comfort, I would take a slightly used / CPO 7 series or MB E55/E63 AMG/E550 4Matic. Even 07 S550′s are in the 50k range now. I just don’t see the appeal of buying new “near luxury” sport sedans. Either get a luxury car or a sport car. I feel these compromise cars are disappointing like you found out. Either not enough luxury, or not enough sport.

    Maybe a CPO Z4/SLK/Boxter to have fun + a CPO MB E350/ML350 for driving the family around. You can get both combined for less than a new G37 or the comparable 3 series.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Tummy you are right on the money. For the money buy an MB. I’ve been trying to explain that on TTAC.

  • avatar
    wsn

    wsn :
    April 6th, 2009 at 12:24 pm

    A tip for potential buyers:

    When you hear people saying “a used A car is a better value than a new B car” or “A car is a better value than B car but you have to go to another continent to buy it“, you can be quite certain that A car is a piece of crap.

    ———————————————-

    WOW, I sure do have foresight…

    FYI, a slightly used G35 could be one third the cost of a E63AMG.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    There are two things I generally don’t get: AWD cars and coupes. AWD generally costs more, makes for a heavier car with worse gas mileage and higher maintenance costs. There is little upside. Most places don’t require AWD (in the DC area, where I live, AWD is a joke unless you actually go off road). Most places where it might come in handy, they know how to plow. With very few exceptions, AWD in cars like these is a waste of money.

    Coupes can look very nice and I particularly like the coupe version of the 335i, but you pay more for a coupe and get less utility in return. Much as I like the 335i, I’d prefer to save a few thousand dollars and get two additional doors.

    For my money, I’d get the G37 Journey Sport Sedan with the 7 speed auto. If I was going to spend the money BMW is asking for the 335ix, I’d kick in a few more dollars and get the CTS-V.

  • avatar

    FREEDMIKE

    I’d take a CTS-V over the C63, the M3 and the “everything else”

    But I am 6’7 and over 300lbs so it doesn’t work for me at all.

    i own a Chrysler 300 a 2002 Expedition and an S550Benz.

  • avatar
    konaforever

    BEAT :
    April 7th, 2009 at 11:33 am

    Before I won’t even notice the BMW and Infiniti but with lesser car on the road. They are more obvious. You guys always love the BMW. I rode the BMW it has nothing special about it.

    When your inside the car the only thing that you notice is that your inside a $35,000 BMW.

    That’s because you rode in a BMW. You don’t ride in a BMW; you drive one.

  • avatar
    boredlawstudent

    I just bought a “gently used” CPO 2007 G35 for $24K. Looks, drives, and is warrantied like new (actually, better than new) for a fraction of the cost. Fantastic automobile.

  • avatar
    davey49

    I would say that neither one of these cars look all that great. They look like cars. Probably drive nice though.
    Freedmike- You probably should have said first off that you’d have passengers in this car.
    I’m thinking more Hyundai Genesis vs Pontiac G8 as opposed to 535 vs M35

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Davey -

    Yeah, but I thought my “passengers” (my kids) would be OK with a smaller car. They barely fit in the back seat.

    That got me thinking – what if I want to show off my fly new car and take another couple to dinner? They wouldn’t fit at all.

    (sigh)

    By the way, I have been driving midsize cars (including the G8 – which is a DYNAMITE car) and will do another comparo.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    ccd1-

    I live in Denver, and trust me – on a rear drive, 300 hp sports sedan with low profile performance tires, AWD is how you get to work every day. Plus, if you’d like to visit the mountains in the wintertime, it’s pretty much a necessity.

    I have two friends with similar cars – a Caddy STS V-8 and a Chrysler 300C Hemi – who can’t get up hills in three inches of snow. The combination of rear-drive, a powerful engine and low profile tires is murder in even a small snowstorm, and we get that kind of snow ALL the time here.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    After driving a Mitsubishi Evo X. I won’t settle for anything more or less.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    FreedMike:
    live in Denver, and trust me – on a rear drive, 300 hp sports sedan with low profile performance tires, AWD is how you get to work every day. Plus, if you’d like to visit the mountains in the wintertime, it’s pretty much a necessity.

    I’m familiar with Great Lakes snow belts. AWD is nice in a plow truck or if you have 2 miles of poorly plowed local road.

    For a daily driver on average roads, give me an MT RWD sedan with (a 2nd set of rims and) good snow tires over AWD. Sure, RWD has limitations in the snow, but they can be mitigated with good tires and some caution.

  • avatar
    wsn

    FreedMike :
    April 8th, 2009 at 11:42 am

    I live in Denver, and trust me – on a rear drive, 300 hp sports sedan with low profile performance tires, AWD is how you get to work every day. Plus, if you’d like to visit the mountains in the wintertime, it’s pretty much a necessity.

    —————————————–

    Amazing! So, people in Denver all drive AWD cars to work? I thought in the states 80% of all cars are FWD cars.

    Do you have an AWD only lane? Or can AWD cars in Denver can fly over stranded FWD cars?

  • avatar
    escapenguin

    Vinyl? Wow. So I guess this is why when car mags test these things they’re conveniently optioned out. I’d never heard about base cars having that until now. Heck, I haven’t seen vinyl in any car I’ve been inside recently regardless of price, since my parents’ old Mercury Sable wagon.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    Maybe because they don’t call it vinyl anymore. They have names like Leatherette, or MB Tex. In many ways it is better than leather, longer lasting, more resistant to stains, softer. Plus you’re not killing an animal to sit on it.

  • avatar
    davey49

    You’d be surprised how nice modern synthetic seat materials are. (It may not actually be a vinyl)

  • avatar
    wsn

    # Tummy :
    April 8th, 2009 at 9:58 pm

    Maybe because they don’t call it vinyl anymore. They have names like Leatherette, or MB Tex. In many ways it is better than leather, longer lasting, more resistant to stains, softer. Plus you’re not killing an animal to sit on it.

    ———————————————-

    LOL. It’s cheap cheap vinyl. Period.

    You know why? Because real leather cost more.

    If this “Leatherette” thing is better than real leather, it should cost as much or more (even if the production cost is the less). As long as it cost more money to have real leather, Leatherette is just a cheap substitute for BMW wannabes.

    BTW, there is nothing wrong with killing animals. African lions eat zebras everyday. And we call that natural balance. We don’t shoot the killer lions. As for the environment, real leather decompose with no harm to anyone. In ancient times, people eat their leather belts when they are starving.

  • avatar
    wsn

    You know, here in Canada, the base Lexus IS250 comes with cloth seats. But it’s really cheap, at $32k. (compare to $20k Honda Fit)

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I made it a point to drive both the AWD and RWD variants of these cars in snowy conditions to check out whether AWD is worth it. I’m here to report that it is.

    My report: it’s certainly possible to get around in a powerful rear-wheel drive sports sedan without AWD, but it certainly makes the drive more enjoyable, particularly in stop-and-go traffic.

    The alternative is to swap tires twice a year, which means dropping a grand or so on winter tires, plus a second set of wheels (which aren’t cheap on a BMW or Infiniti), versus a couple extra grand for the AWD setup, and you’re set.

  • avatar
    agenthex

    The alternative is to swap tires twice a year, which means dropping a grand or so on winter tires, plus a second set of wheels (which aren’t cheap on a BMW or Infiniti), versus a couple extra grand for the AWD setup, and you’re set.

    That comparison doesn’t make sense. AWD will only help under power-on conditions. Mediocre drivers with poor throttle control often feel it’s better because it seems a bit faster or whatever when they “step on it”.

    In comparison, winter tires are far superior to AWD only since they work under static cornering and braking.

    If you don’t want to swap tires, get traction/stability control, AWD is for performance rally driving.

  • avatar
    Mirko Reinhardt

    @FreedMike :
    The alternative is to swap tires twice a year, which means dropping a grand or so on winter tires, plus a second set of wheels (which aren’t cheap on a BMW or Infiniti), versus a couple extra grand for the AWD setup, and you’re set.

    You are really, without irony or sarcasm, suggesting that AWD is a replacement for winter tires?

    Are there still people who believe that?

    The winter wheels for my BMW (BMW steelies with run-flat BMW-recommended Conti WinterContact run-flat tires) were less than 700€.
    That’s cheaper than crashing in winter with summer tires – no insurance will pay anything, at lest where I live.

    @agenthex :
    If you don’t want to swap tires, get traction/stability control, AWD is for performance rally driving.

    If you don’t want to swap tires, stay the hell off the road in winter.

  • avatar

    Mirko – I was glad to see that someone raised the question: You are really, without irony or sarcasm, suggesting that AWD is a replacement for winter tires?

    Are there still people who believe that?

    Apparently there are and worse yet, those who think that “summer” in tire description has nothing to do with the tire’s performance at near-freezing temperatures. People conveniently forget that safely driving in winter has two components: going and stopping. Without winter tires, one might go acceptably, but the 4WD has zero to do with the car’s stopping ability. I’d guess this is why whenever I’ve been to the Sierra in the winter, 80% of the cars stuffed into snow banks are 4WD. That’s why I leave the BMW at home and rent a car or truck with snow tires and at least FWD. If I lived in the mountains, I suspect that it is far cheaper to buy a beater FWD and mount snows to it for use in the winter than to subject either the G37 or 335/328 to salt-laden roads.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    Sorry, neither of these automobiles are worth $45K. Too many people have been trained by “Big Marketing”.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Wow, a heated discussion about AWD versus snow tires? LOL…lighten up, guys. No one thinks AWD is going to make your car into the Mach 5 with the magic traction tires. It won’t keep you out of a ditch if you drive too fast for conditions. It won’t help you steer better or brake quicker.

    What it WILL do is help a powerful rear wheel drive car – like the two in this comparo – get up the hill in my subdivision, or make sure you can get going in stop-and-go traffic on a uphill slope…without having to deal with changing tires.

    See, here in Denver, we don’t get huge storms – we get 3-4 inches twice a week, with 45-50 degree sunshine for the next couple of days. That means that everything that comes down Monday is gone in a day. And while that’s nice, it also means the state and cities here do NOT bother to do much with the roads unless it’s a big storm, so getting through the storm is pretty much self-serv.

    In 14 years here, I’ve seen plenty of 4WDs stuck in ditches, but I’ve also seen plenty of RWD Mercedes and BMWs struggle to make it up even gentle hills, or get away from a traffic light, in a few inches of snow. That’s the kind of car I’m looking at, and if it costs a couple of grand to make sure I can get home, I’m game. If it isn’t worth it to you, buy a RWD car and enjoy the adventure.

  • avatar
    stuckintraffic

    I leased a 2007 328 coupe in 2007 with the understanding that 1) a beemer was always a goal of mine, 2) drove better than a 328 sedan and g35 sedan for me (with 328 sedan > g35) , 3) infiniti g35 was a better value.

    It’s 2009 and this understanding still holds true. When my lease is up in 2010 I may just purchase a g37 to reduce monthly costs without reducing (if any) driving fun.

    I will say this, at least in my area of los angeles – the value of the Beemer brand is still stronger than Infiniti’s. The premium of a 335 and even a 328 over the g37 is paying for the social judgement and impressions made by the general public – although its usually vocally negative (ever hear of the cactus vs bmw joke?) the mental effect i believe is positive for the owner.

    Oh yeah and I loathe the g35′s tail lights but can accept the g37′s a bit more =P

  • avatar
    Tummy

    That’s why LA is so messed up… when someone gets more “respect” based on them affording (or not affording but doing it anyways) a ~$399/mo lease payment. Though I never lived there and have only visited a handful of times over the years, I can’t believe how shallow some people are. I do however enjoy the plethora of nice interesting cars around LA.

    That said, I have two Mercedes (E & SLK) and an Infiniti (FX45), all less than 5 years old and paid off. How does that rank? People I know in and around NYC don’t appear to care what you drive. I think they’re probably surprised I have a car at all.

  • avatar

    In the hope that we don’t get an LA vs NY thread fired up, suffice it to say that people everywhere have insecurities. That they are manifested differently depending upon where one lives is the result of micro-cultures, in the same way that there are folks who prefer Corvettes to Porsches, or even more shockingly, do not care about the driving differences between a BMW 3-series and a Camry.

    Like Tummy, I happen to prefer paid-off cars to those owned by someone other than me, but that is just my more conservative financial bent.

    That said, I still think we live in a golden age of enthusiast cars. For under $50k, one can buy a new, nicely equipped C-class, 3-series, G37, IS350 or A4; each of which has a different slant on the balance of luxury to performance and all of which are lightyears ahead of their predecessors of just ten years ago.

  • avatar
    Neogy

    Nice review BUT there is no mention of the viscous LSD that the G37 comes with. I would consider that very important equipment on a sports car. BMW now only fits LSDs on it’s M cars.

  • avatar
    tate

    i guess the debate will never end as it is always difficult to choose between what the heart says and what the head asks.
    The reason why it is doubly difficult is because the two cars are so closely matched that there are no clear winners.
    The bottom line is- think of the price differential of 10K as opportunity cost and whether the BMW’s slight superiority and snob value is worth the 10K or not?
    I am married and have plenty of utilization for that 10K, specially in these times. Therefore i chose the G-sedan; which also by the way is more spacious than the 3.
    So go ahead buy the G and spend the 10k somewhere worthwhile.

  • avatar
    rodsterinfl

    Hey all

    I’ve been driving both of these in deciding between them for a purchase. I can only say that at this point, I am leaning toward the G37 coupe over the 335 coupe version.

    The drive of the 335 is great. It is fast and agile. The position of the seat while driving is sedan-ish. The wind and road noise is muffled and the engine is heard mostly at take off. ALL OPTIONS are pricey and it pretty much is stripped with little standard goodies.

    The G37 is also quite fast. It gives the impression that it is ready to leap forward and fly.It is just as agile (to me) and the seat position is lounge-like. It is difficult to describe but it is more sport coupe styled seating – slung back and comfortable. The car even in base form comes well-equipped. The Infiniti is equally quiet and the exhaust sound is very nice at acceleration. The ride on bumps is slightly stiffer.I drove a premium package/Nav Journey with the self healing paint and auto. The features made it seem like piloting a fighter space craft or something, talking navigation taking requests, etc. The feature set is unmatched.

    I went back and made sure not to focus on the features and just drove. I could not help peaking at the sticker at a red-light. Considering that Infiniti locally offers itself within the Costco buying program, a realized difference of $13K is quite a difference. Either car is quick, comfortable and built well. The arguments against? The G35′s were criticized for their interiors. I looked at a used ond and know why. The G37 is not at all the same-much more upscale.
    The BMW is known to not be a car to keep past the warranty. There are forum concerns with the turbo heating and electrical issues have always plagued BMW (I have owned them) add to that stories about magnesium alloy rotors that are designed to last about 20K miles on the recent models and I lean toward the Infiniti. In the last month I have been referencing the free maintenance of BMW and I have concluded that the purpose is to keep them competitive and not have marks against them (since 4yrs free) otherwise they would be in trouble. In spite of this I think the BMW coupes (3 series) are beautiful. I just do not believe they are near the reliability of Japanese engineering. Yes, I think that I will be getting the G car and keeping the $13K left over.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    I would take a 1 yr old G37 Coupe with Prem / Journey for less than $30k. The 1st year depreciation is usually the worse, even if you get it with a costco discount.

  • avatar
    Alex D

    I was faced with the same dilemma last December. We wanted to replace a car and I really wanted a 335i since we already have and love a 2001 330CiC convertible with a 5-speed and all options. That car has now 133,000 miles and runs like a champ.

    After three weeks of trying to get to a deal on a BMW we leased a new 2008 G35S Journey. Counting all discounts Infiniti was providing and BMW was not, there remained a difference of $15,000 for similarly equipped cars and I could not reason that away even though I would have liked the Bimmer better.

    Having had the G35 now for 6 months now I can say that it is a formidable machine and in many ways better (mainly space) than the Bimmer, but it does not have the “soul” that even our old 330CiC conveys to its driver. It is too “clean” or “sanitary”. Another deciding factor was the spotty reliability of the Bimmer opposite top notch reliability of the infiniti and that you cannot get the 335i with an LSD diff which comes standard on our G35 Sport and is a major item on wet roads.

    In the end with this much price difference it will be a cold day in you-know-what before I buy a 3-series again though.

  • avatar

    Just swapped my ’06 BMW 325 6MT with Sport for a G37S 6MT with Premium & Navigation. I loved my BMW but sometimes tired of the need to rev it all the time when I wasn’t in a playing mood (but what a sweet engine). In the end I chose the G37S because it is a reasonable facsimile of a BMW 335 but affordable with my $35K allowance (company car). Yes the engine isn’t as refined but it is kind of fun, yes it is less nimble but it is 90% of the BMW without the wanker image (which is nice), with more space and more toys to distract me during my commute (e.g the Ipod integration is superb and a feature I use daily)

  • avatar
    chemsal

    This is a great review and I could not agree more. I first test drove the 335 and fell in love. I almost bought it then. However, I waited to drive the G37. When it was all send and done I ended up with the G. I ended up with a great ride that was over 10K less then the BMW and better equiped. I’m so impressed with this car. BMW needs wake up. The market place is changing and they will have to deliver more if they want to keep their car at a premium. If your into image or have money to burn then the BMW maybe for you. If not then you should consider the Infiniti.

  • avatar
    rodsterinfl

    UPDATE

    Well from my April post I thought I would add to the news that I did purchase the G37; however, what is interesting for anyone shopping around, originally I was looking at the G coupe and the day I purchase there was every intention to take delivery on the coupe. The dealer even prepped it. When I got to the dealer I took a quick look at the sedan and decided on it.

    I believe that not only is there a decision to be made between BMW and G but also coupe or sedan. The G car icon is the coupe but now that the sedan has everything the coupe does in power (2 hp less but that is pipe length) plus 2X the trunk and usable back seat, less weight AND about $3K less – it is the real deal in the comparison.

  • avatar
    agenthex

    Well, if you’re looking at it from a value perspective, the new Hyundai Genesis Coupe is essentially a lower trim copy of the G coupe for 10k less.

  • avatar
    rodsterinfl

    Well, if you’re looking at it from a value perspective, the new Hyundai Genesis Coupe is essentially a lower trim copy of the G coupe for 10k less.

    I looked at that car too but it is quite a different car than either of the cars in the story. They are sports sedans. The Genesis sedan is an excellent buy but it is not a handler- more a cruiser. It has more room and is quieter though. The coupe is overall very similar but does not have the nice interior and in the 3.8 Grand Touring (most similar to G) is at least $30K.

    I did not mean that cost was the only factor although the gap on the G compared to the Bimmer is huge IMO; however, the Genesis sedan was quoted to me at $36K and the coupe provides a similar look and feel of a G but the interior is not close at all. The local Hyundai dealer in April was NOT discounting Genesis models, especially the new coupes. They priced the coupe I drove Grand Touring 3.8L with auto at just over $30 plus a market adjustment of more (that part negotiable). I paid $33,400 for the G37 journey prem. – about a $3K diff. People make their own choice for sure but I am just sharing that I carefully compared the G to the BMW and found the G to be the better choice overall. I appreciate this article and the comment helps.

    The Hyundai Genesis cars, especially that sedan are unbelievable for the price and I would not hesitate to buy one if in the market for a plush sedan-Avalon, 5or 7 series, ES or even larger Lexus. The coupe is great although in its 4cyl form I would not buy and the 3.8 is great but I found the $3k to be worth the difference in space, 7spd and overall quality.

  • avatar
    agenthex

    That’s a pretty good price on the g37.

    When I went to take a look at the coupe vs coupe, I found the difference to be about 7-8k, or even more if settling for the turbo 4 which is fast enough for general use. The car basically gets down to altima coupe territory on the low end and certainly drives better than that. Didn’t care for the el-cheapo silver painted plastic interior vs the fairly nice Infiniti one, and getting a first year car seems risky even with that warranty.

    It’s quite obvious hyundai benchmarked the G coupe for their new car, the dimensions and overall capabilities are nearly identical. Hyundai seems ready to strike at the G37 much like how the G35 did the 3series.

  • avatar
    justin.82

    Infinity and BMW both make great sedans! I’ve read about Infinity so it’s hear say but reviews have been good. I have owned many BMW Sedans and I must say there the absolute experts in that field. I’ve owned the following. A 1995 525i, 1995 540i, 1989 325i, 2000 325xi, 2003 325i, 2004 535i, and my current models the 2007 M5, and 2009 M3 – I love the way BMW engineers there automobiles. There the only company to my knowledge that’s not a corporation so there not held up on corporate adhendas and salaries. They just engineer a wonderful car. I admit the idrive sucks but you get used to it like every new gadget. If you want engineering and power wth hanfling and longevity go with the BMW! Just an opinion from an avid BMW driver!

  • avatar
    georgej

    I always wondered how people determine the “value” and whether you can really compare these two based on value. It’s almost like the heavy weight championship. You ever wonder why the champion gets 20mil and the challenger 10? Why does he get 19mil, after all he is the second best and there is a slim margin of one position between the two. The truth is that it takes a whole lot more time, dedication, personal sacrifice and determination to climb the mountain and the champ gets paid for it.

    Similarly, with these two cars or any other such comparisons. Undeniably the BMW stands as the champion and there is a price to pay for it. It really comes down to how much you are willing to pay for being #1. Some people are willing to compromise because this particular part of their life is not that important, so they settle on second place and feel great about saving a few bucks. That’s perfectly fine. Once you get into value though it’s not a fair comparison. All those little differences add up. BMW has better leather, better quality materials, better transmission, better engine, etc. I know they are just a little bit better, but that little bit costs more than a little bit because it is that much more difficult to achieve and in the end it is that much more difficult and subtle to appreciate.

    I have no doubt that Nissan can go and order the best transmissions, just like BMW did, and the better leather, heck they can even go and order the motor like so may companies do, but when they put it together while I have no doubt their cars will be as good as the BMW they will probably cost more. Why I think that? well, because I believe experience, pedigree and intangibles will make the difference. And because Nissan does not have them yet, they have to create a vehicle a notch below while trying to make the value argument.

    My opinion anyway.

  • avatar
    fps_dean

    I would say the Infiniti does not look like a luxury car. The exterior reminds me of a Chevy Impala (plain jane) and the interior reminds me of maybe a Toyota Camry with a whole lot more visibly sharp edges on it.

    On the flipside, the BMW 3 series is one of the best cars in its class (along with the Cadillac CTS which may just have it beat), but the 3 series interior is BMW’s best. Why? Because the 5 and 7 series interior is pretty much the same, but you can have a great interior at a lower cost in the 3 series.

    The Hyundai Genesis has the best options and size and whatnot of the class, but talk to a Hyundai mechanic and they will quickly convince you too look elsewhere. I’ve seen numerous reports of the transmission failing as soon as buyers drive the darn thing off the lot — common problem with Hyundais.

  • avatar
    jklmp

    Right now, after weak president’s day sales, either of these cars can be had for a good discount, at least in the Boston area, where dealers have huge inventories of both. I just got a new G37x with nav & premium for $38K. The best price I could find on a 328x (wasn’t even considering the 335) with equivalent features (nav, premium, “comfort access”, park distance, premium sound, sirius, xenon) was about $5K more. Both cars surpassed my expectations for acceleration and handling. Besides the cost advantage, I was also swayed towards the Infiniti by the normal tires (had bad luck with the run-flats in my AWD Sienna), and the backup camera (BMW doesn’t even offer this very useful feature).

  • avatar
    Cougar Red

    I’ve driven a 2004 G35 sedan for 6+ years. It’s been a good car. Love the way it handles. Love the engine, stereo and AC. The road noise is a little much on the highway, and you feel every bump in the road. That and poor gas mileage in city driving are the only negatives I ever saw in my ’04 G35.

    I decided to see what’s out there. I went to CarsDirect.com and Truecar.com to find out what other people are paying, what dealer invoice is, and what my target price should be. I studied:

    Infiniti G37
    Cadillac CTS 3.6L
    BMW 328i
    BMW 335i
    Acural TL
    Hyundai Genesis 4.6L
    Mercedes C350
    Audi A4
    Lexus IS350
    Lexus ES350
    Lexus GS350

    I was looking for a premium leather interior with navigation and upgraded stereo, and wood accents in the cabin. I did not price out “sport packages” or “performance tires” or “adaptive cruise control.”

    I was shocked to find that the dealer invoice and my target price according to CarsDirect.com was significantly lower on the G37 sedan than on any of the competitors. Shocked because the G37 offers superior performance to all of the cars listed above save perhaps the 335i. But that car costs $10K more comparably equipped.

    I test drove a G37 to make sure it’s what I wanted, then I sent out an e-mail blast to all the Infiniti dealers in Texas. I told them what I was looking for, and asked for their best price.

    I wound up buying a 2010 G37 Journey RWD sedan with a 7-speed automatic and the following options:

    White exterior
    Wheat leather interior
    Premium package
    Navigation package
    Wood accent package
    Tinted windows
    Illuminated kick plates
    Splash guards
    Carpeted trunk mat
    Trunk cargo net
    First aid kit

    My price was $36,386 + TTL which is close to $1000 under factory invoice because of a $1000 dealer cash incentive going on. Personally, I don’t think you can come close to buying as much car for $36.4K no matter what brand you are looking at.

    One other thing I noticed: many of the cars listed above have grown considerably in size throughout the years. The G sedan has not. Maybe 0.5″ in length and 0.5″ in width in the last 6 years. This means I won’t have to rearrange my garage to fit a bigger vehicle inside it.


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