By on January 7, 2009

Can we forget the BMW M3 for a moment? If you analyze the IS-F from a evo-lutionary perspective, the highly-horsed Lexus four-door is a loser. Looks, handling, pedigree, charisma, horsepower– the IS-F is the Bimmer’s bitch. Instead, imagine approaching the IS-F as I did, after test driving the LS460. Driving along in Japan’s big ass barge, the usual pistonhead thoughts occurred. Sweet engine! If only the throttle was a touch more responsive. If there wasn’t this dreaded Old School floaty rebound. If the car was a bit… smaller. I don’t know. Fun. And then you jump into the IS-F. Mission accomplished. Only who asked Lexus to build a car for me?

In terms of brand betrayal, the Lexus IS-F is only sight less egregious than Jaws 3-D. Why add a performance sub-brand to a marque that answered the question: when better Buicks are built, who will build them? Suffice it to say, this is no time to be screwing around with Lexus; sales have slipped lower than an M3’s front valance. The F-on or F-off argument will remain in suspended animation until the worldwide auto business recovers. So I’ll let my grandchildren hash it out. Did I just say M3 again? Damn.

Which reminds me of the English expression: damn your eyes sir! Done. It’s hard to discern the difference between fish-eye photographs of the IS-F and the wee beastie in the flesh. (I half expected my high school headmaster to thrust his face in front of mine and ask “Are you sure you haven’t taken something?”) There isn’t a single viewing angle that makes the slightest bit of sense. The rear three-quarter is as close to handsome as this tuner-clad mutant gets, and that’s ruined by quad tailpipes designed by Salvator Dali.

Lower yourself into the supportive embrace of the IS-F’s Lexian leather and there’s much to admire. The oil dampened ash tray’s a hoot. And I love the feel of lacquered milled aluminum in the morning. Feels like… plastic. Only sexier. The IS-F boasts the world’s finest gauges: simple, legible and elegant. The tachometer is right where it should be (on the right). And what’s this hold-me touch-me steering wheel doing in a Lexus? Even stranger, the brand’s faultlessly boring buttons, knobs, dials and icons all seem somehow more purposeful when mounted so close to hand. There’s not a lot of head, leg, shoulder, arm or torso room in the back, but that’s someone else’s problem. 

Stirring the IS-F’s Yamaha-fettled direct-injection 5.0-liter V8– the same engine that whooshes the LS 600hL’s occupants to the Sierra Club annual ball– rouses a pillow-smothered burble. The speedo and tacho’s white wands swing to clockwise and back in a two rapid, perfectly synchronized arcs. Toto, I have a feeling we’re not headed for the golf club. Or if we are, we’re going to get some serious driving range action before tee time. It’s my kind of cognitive dissonance. 

Yes, yes; there’s no stick; like any good English public school, paddles rule. Lexus’ trick tranny is plenty quick, and there’s a sport button to make you think it’s even faster when you’re in a hurry. So just make sure you brought your Shell car, put it in D and mash the gas. 

 The 416hp IS-F’s goal is instantly clear: to provide more thrust than the kidney-crushing Mercedes C63 AMG. Which it can’t And doesn’t. But it’s not for lack of trying. The IS-F generates more shove than a German buffet line, propelling the carcoon from zero to sixty in 4.2 seconds. Above 3400 rpm, an induction howl rushes in even as the blood rushes away from your extremities. Redline arrives at “just” 6800 (cough M3 cough), but there’s enough basso profundo sonic enticement to make cog swapping a pleasure.

The IS-F’s greatest handling “fault” (in the comparative, not absolute sense) is a heavy, sodden feeling at initial turn in. It’s the kind of sluggishness that once characterized uber-Audis, that tempts you to just go on floor the damn thing already. Muscle car aficionados will appreciate the tail wagging action. If you like to dance, there are more balletic partners.  

There’s a better way to look at this. The IS-F’s steering, handling and brakes are more than good enough when you want to drive a Lexus like your hair’s on fire. Of course, that presumes you want to drive a Lexus. And as a rule, people who want to drive a Lexus don’t want to drive like they’re in pain. Why would they?

So why would Lexus build the IS-F? How many bi-polar pistonheads would spend the thick end of $50k on an ugly Lexus that goes like Hell? Judging from current IS-F inventory levels and the fact that I can’t find any PR shots, not many. It doesn’t make much sense, but I know of at least one driver who’d adopt this unlikely orphan.

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58 Comments on “Review: 2008 Lexus IS-F Take Two...”


  • avatar
    gaycorvette

    How would you say the IS-F’s handling stacks up against the C63 AMG’s? I don’t think either is a great handler – both cars are mostly about their engines.

    So how would you rate them?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    This car is ugly! It tries to feel fast! The handling isn’t the best! This car sucks!

    5 STARS!

    WTF?

  • avatar
    Point Given

    In my brief foray as a Lexus salesperson I can honestly say that 2nd air intake opening growl is the sole bit of individuality, intrigue and interest in the whole damn Lexus lineup. It’s like opening vanilla ice cream and discovering a spec of dark chocolate in the middle. An interesting bit, how did this get here and then disposed of without much of an after thought.

    It’s the only Lexus vehicle that didn’t bore me to tears followed by putting me to sleep.

    But man downshifting the paddle and stomping on the gas was damn fine fun.

  • avatar

    gaycorvette :

    Same diff.

    Jerome10 :

    I couldn’t agree more.

  • avatar
    dgduris

    So, RF,

    Out w/ the Boxster then?

  • avatar
    arapaima

    They forgot the wing on the trunk.

  • avatar
    noreserve

    I imagine that the snug interior is sweet vanilla precision. Unfortunately, I simply couldn’t subject others to that Godzilla-ugly exterior that only the Japanese can love. Those exhaust pipes… the horror, the horror. And those Samurai eyebrows for taillights plastered on that generic rear-end take the cake. No thanks. A 1-star on the exterior styling doesn’t compute with a 5-star overall.

  • avatar

    Yamaha has been engineering and manufacturing engine bits (maybe even entire engines) to Toyota for decades. My 1988 Celica All-trac Turbo had “Yamaha” cast into the head. I think Toyota’s original 16v engine for the MR2 and Corolla GT-S was also Yamaha’s work. Not sure if the same is true for Toyota’s more pedestrian engines.

    On the M3–I’m one of the few who’s quite disappointed in the car. I hate the steering, it’s far too light. Other reviewers have noted the light steering, and shrugged it off as a minor issue. Sorry, but steering feel is a top priority for me, and I’m surprised it isn’t for anyone who cares about handling.

    On the IS-F: notice anything special about the transmission? It’s supposed to entirely lack a slushy feel, thanks to a torque converter that remains locked during ultra-quick shifts.

    Finally, my usual bit on reliability. We have only a small sample size for the IS. But the indication from this small sample is that IS reliability isn’t up to the Lexian norm. Might even be a touch worse than average. I’d really like a larger sample size, to hash this out.

    So, if anyone knows an IS owner, please send them here:

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

  • avatar

    I can explain the 5 for RF. Sometimes when you drive a car it’s so fun that you forget the weak bits. It got extra credit.

  • avatar
    dgduris

    That’s the thing about love (5 Stars in this case): it’s a mystery!

  • avatar

    I owned an IS350 for two years and I test drove the IS-F to consider upgrading. Lotta power and was in your face, but the IS350 felt more nimble and had plenty of power, even if it tried it’s best to numb you from it. It was faster than it felt and was a terror on the race track (HPDE stuff.) Can’t imagine the extra power of the IS-F on the track but wonder about the weight in the front. The 350 would rotate the rear like nobody’s business.

    Couldn’t beat the interior though. Loved that everything was usable with gloves on and the steering wheel just felt _nice_.

    It was an ’06 so you had to go through a Nintendo-like foot pedal sequence to fully disable the traction electronics though. But on the street, they saved my butt more than once, including at the Tail of the Dragon.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Little secret — RF is right .

    The IS-F is a deeply great car. And RF’s wrong (I know) about the handling — it’s pretty fantastic.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    I’ve seen one in person and thought it looked rather handsome. A subtle rocketship.

  • avatar
    beken

    When shopping for a car last year, this car was recommended to have a look at by almost anybody that wanted to give me advice. So my wife and I went for a look.

    We didn’t even drive it. Something about the looks of the car turned my wife off. I liked the fit and finish, but when I sat inside, I couldn’t get enough lower back support to be comfortable in the seats. Not sure what’s missing. All the specs and eye candy are there but…

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Tastes differ. I think this car looks OK.

    People often seem to dislike the look of Lexi but I think they’re generally OK and the IS-250 and IS-350, in particular, are very attractive cars. My wife, who is usually completely indifferent to all things automotive, happened to see one go by us while we were on the freeway and said, “What’s that?”

    “A Lexus.”

    “It’s nice-looking. How much is it?”

    “North of $30K.”

    “Hmmm…”

    Which, from my wife, for an automobile, is the highest possible praise. It’s more than she’d normally spend on a car but she thought it so attractive that she wouldn’t rule it out at that price.

  • avatar
    shoes

    We need to come up with a mnemonic so that RF can remember that BMW comes from Munich while Mercedes and Porsche originate in Stuttgart.

  • avatar

    shoes :

    Doh!

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Before people start on about the tailpipes.

    Point One:

    There are only three ways to “do” exhausts because you cannot attach them to the bumper (the exhaust moves, the bumper doesn’t, and the pipes get hot):
    A) Hang it under the bumper like an econocar. Premium cars use a version of this whereby a U-shaped hole is cut in the bumper and the pipes float below.

    B) Float it in a hole in the bumper. The gap will be big, uneven, and the pipe will wiggle, thusly looking cheesy. Examples? Well, there’s a slammed Cavalier at the grocery store that does this.

    C) Have a fake tip integrated into the bumper, and float the pipes behind it. Examples? The Veyron, any modern Lambo, the Audi R8, Ferrari California and the Lexus IS-F, which leads to point two below:

    Point Two:

    If it’s ok for the Veyron and Muircelago to adopt this bit of stylistic fakery, why not the IS-F?

    Oh right, I forgot, “heritage”.

    Fair disclosure: I like Lexus. I think it’s important that someone makes a near-no-compromises luxury car that isn’t going to cost owners an arm and a leg because the maintenance schedule is designed for three-year leases (BMW) or the service department works on a “How can I screw you today?” basis (Mercedes, Audi).

    I can’t say I really like the new IS, but that’s because I loved the old one dearly. The new one is nicer, but the old one was the most perfect driver’s car for those of us who needed a back seat, moreso than the contemporary 3-Series, I’d opine. The problem? It wasn’t “Lexus” enough for either reviewers, or the Lexus public, which was fair, because it was really a Toyota Altezza.

    Hence we get the new one, which is beautiful inside, more or less nice outside, more refined for sure, but much less of a sports car.

  • avatar
    frizzlefry

    Its unfortunate but no matter how well this car performs, it has cosmetic fake exhaust tips…fake. On a car like this. LAME.

  • avatar
    rochskier

    I had the chance to observe an IS-F in maroon for several minutes at speed.

    The term “kit car mutant” doesn’t even begin to describe how hideous and cheap looking this vehicle is.

    The current M3 and GT-R, which I have also seen in the flesh, are graceful swans by comparison.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    WARNING: FAMILY GUY COMMENT

    I got in one of these at the auto show and the back seat appeared to have less space than a Corolla. It’s tiny back there. Won’t fit a car seat with space for the passenger to move the seat back.

    This is a 2 seater with 2 extra doors to throw a laptop bag in back.

  • avatar
    ajla

    psarhjinian :

    What about sidepipes?

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    Personally I like the base IS styling a great deal. Better than any other car in it’s class (yes including the CTS-which is much improve-first gen CTS looks so 80’s now).

    One thing I find interesting is the test acceleration times for the IS-F are about spot on the base ‘Vette. Considering it is way heavier and spots the ‘Vette a liter on displacement that is very impressive.

    Imagine if they cut the platform a foot, pushed the engine back a bit and gave it swoopy body work and a 6M trans option. The resulting car (Supra?) would spank a base ‘Vette, might give a Z06 a run.

    Fortuantely for GM Toyota is not interested.

    Imagine if Nissan remembered they make V-8s when they do a sports car. I think a 500Z for $45K would make an interesting comparo with the ‘Vette.

    I think the IS250 droptop with a 6M trans could be very nice.

    Bunter

  • avatar
    Casual Observer

    The VP of my company has one of these, and the ugliness mentioned is an understatement. It’s a mutant.

    Compare this with the better-looking G8-GXP: as much horsepower with a lot more torque (415 lb-ft) and a manual option. You can take some of the $15K you save and buy a Garmin.

    Or pay the same price for the insane CTS-V.

  • avatar
    like.a.kite

    psarhjinian:

    The Lexus pipes suck because they’re vertical for the sake of being different, like the DB9’s tach going counter-clockwise for symmetry.

    They seriously look ridiculous, like an optical illusion.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    What about sidepipes?

    Got me there. There’s also the Big-Rig stacks I see with depressing regularity on Dodge Rams.

    I got in one of these at the auto show and the back seat appeared to have less space than a Corolla. It’s tiny back there. Won’t fit a car seat with space for the passenger to move the seat back.

    That’s true. A lot has to do with the otherwise-massive front seats, which fit very tall people very well. It’s also curious, considering how the old IS managed to scallop some useful space back there.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The Lexus pipes suck because they’re vertical for the sake of being different, like the DB9’s tach going counter-clockwise for symmetry.

    Again, I ask: Veyron, Muircelago, California, R8. All these cars have exhaust tips that are total and utter fakery. Shine a light through the car while it’s lifted and you’ll see the same thing.

    Why is the Lexus’ worse?

    Should every car be functional, with raw, unfinished tips hanging below the bumper like a Camry?

  • avatar
    like.a.kite

    psarhjinian:

    Fakery is irrelevant. In fact, the top row is in no way connected to any exhaust. But fake pipes and a second row of them, totally defying convention and good taste? No.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Fakery is irrelevant. They should not be vertical.

    So should they be centered? Should the point down? Should there be one or two? What’s the correct, approved way to do an exhaust pipe? Or a headlight? Taillight? Door handle? Front grille?

    It’s a neat little stylistic kick. You may as well condemn everything that isn’t the 1992 Camry if you have trouble with irregularities.

    I really get the impression that a lot of people have a chip on their shoulder with regards to Lexus and will reach for any excuse to knock them. Yes, the overall car has a bit of a boy-racerish feel to it, but far too many people are far too hung up on the exhaust pipes. If the lit-from-behind-while-on-a-lift photos had been splattered across the blogosphere by insecure BMW fans, I don’t think anyone would have noticed.

    When I saw this car in person, I had (and still have) trouble with the Z3/Z4-ish bulging front end. I don’t think I even noticed the pipes.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    I had a chance to flog an IS F on an autocross for a photo shoot a couple weekends ago. Unfortunately I didn’t have enough time to learn or figure out how to hard disable the stability control. No matter what I did I couldn’t get the car to rotate to save its life. The sound and the acceleration were astounding but the the stability control was way too much of a nanny to be fun.

  • avatar
    madcat

    People who complain about the exhaust tips need to get some seat time in this car.

    I took one of these out for a spin. It is *very* easy to forgive the questionable styling choices once you experience the immense thrust, and intake sound past 3500 RPM.

    The 8-speed manu-matic is slush-free. Fast and crisp, with rev-matched downshifts. Fiddly, though — a car with this much torque doesn’t need 8 speeds.

    It’s a great car, but of course, the competition isn’t too shabby either.

  • avatar
    davey49

    It’s ugly outside, pretty inside.
    Not sure I care about the -F part but the IS seems nice. No Lexus dealers nearby to sit in one.

  • avatar

    I’d rather have an RS4.

    Make that an S4.

    Make that an A4.

    Make that a four-cylinder A4 and a solid punch to the left testicle.

    The sole mission statement Lexus has — the relentless pursuit of cut-rate imitation Benzes — falls a little short here, because the car isn’t cheap enough.

  • avatar

    The base IS is a wonderful, elegant little car – best styling in the class as far as I am concerned. Not too much bling like the C-series, nor the unpurposeful business of the 3, and without the droopy lids of the A4.

    The IS-F is just too bloated looking in comparison. I’d rather just tune an IS350 for something close.

    As for the interior, I like that the buttons are where they should be and “boring”… so much better than pointless gadgetry like iDrive and screens you need to look at to navigate.

    Then again, I drive a Boxster which is pretty much pure functional sport.

  • avatar
    PeteMoran

    Thanks RF! Great read.

    Can you go out and test a GS450h next please?

  • avatar

    I like the styling of the standard IS — I think it’s one of the better-looking sedans available in the U.S. at the moment, although perhaps that is damning it with faint praise. The boy racer body kit is kind of obnoxious, but if we compare it with the BMW 3-series sedan (not the new coupe, but the sedan, even the newly facelifted version), it fails to offend. I could do without the angry-Jack-O’Lantern taillamps that have become the Lexus corporate look, and high-gloss colors are not its forte, but I am baffled by the “it’s hideously ugly” charges.

  • avatar

    My favorite part of the IS-F is the exhaust… simply because on nearly every forum and blog on the internet there’s the chorus of the faux exhaust tips sucking… an entire car, and the exhaust is why it sucks. The truth is, any exhaust other than a freaking straight pipe and a simple muffler is for show. But if all anyone can hate on this car is the exhaust… the rest of it must be great.

    I can understand not liking a car, but the intense focused hate on this car’s exhaust is just weird, especially since much higher end cars have been there and done that.

  • avatar
    DearS

    Well its cool he gave it 5 stars. If he had a good time, than good for him, while ruin that?

    Although by that token almost any car can get 5 stars. I do not have much of a problem with that. Objective reviews are bias anyhow. I do not get them, cannot get them. I want to learn to leave negatives aside long enough to get 5 stars worth of enjoyment. Than again I’m not perfect, I have needs, I need balance. I have a hard time going from one extreme to the other. Although I think if I lighten up I can be much more nimble. If I expand my perspective and relating to things I can give myself more to focus and enjoy. So thank you (ME)…..Mr. Farago.

  • avatar
    Areitu

    People get angry when Toyota doesn’t build a sporty car, then turn around and get picky and angry when they *do* build a sporty car. Though I don’t have a reason to own one (largely because I can’t afford one) I’m glad the IS-F exists.

    4.2 seconds? I didn’t know it was that fast.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    People get angry when Toyota doesn’t build a[n affordable] sporty car, then turn around and get picky and angry when they *do* build a [$60,000 merely] sporty car.

    Yeah. People are weird like that.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Yamaha has been engineering and manufacturing engine bits (maybe even entire engines) to Toyota for decades. My 1988 Celica All-trac Turbo had “Yamaha” cast into the head. I think Toyota’s original 16v engine for the MR2 and Corolla GT-S was also Yamaha’s work. Not sure if the same is true for Toyota’s more pedestrian engines.

    A bit of clarification:

    Toyota’s history with Yamaha goes back to at least the late 60’s. Their first sports car, the 2000GT used a Yamaha built engine, and the cylinder heads of subsequent twin-cam four cylinder engines, many of which were never available to the U.S. market.

    The 4A-GE used in the Corolla GT-S and MR2 on the other hand, is a reverse-engineered version of the BDA engines that Cosworth built for Ford back in the late 60’s. The dimensions for both engines are quite similar, including bore, stroke, valve diameter, and combustion chamber design.

    With that said, I’m kinda disappointed that this car doesn’t have a proper stick-shift. Even BMW relented and eventually offered up the M5 with a manual gearbox.

    Adding on to this gripe, eight is enough. Only tractor trailers and F1 cars need this many gears to keep their engines in the sweet part of the power band. If you need this many gears to keep that motor at full song, then perhaps they need to retune it for a bit more oomph on the low end.

    People get angry when Toyota doesn’t build a sporty car, then turn around and get picky and angry when they *do* build a sporty car. Though I don’t have a reason to own one (largely because I can’t afford one) I’m glad the IS-F exists.

    I don’t want a sporty car, I want a sports car. You need more than a mega engine and shocks turned up to 11 to get there.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Pretty much the entire 2000GT was built by Yamaha, not just the engine, from what I’ve read.

  • avatar
    JJ

    Veyron, Muircelago, California, R8. All these cars have exhaust tips that are total and utter fakery. Shine a light through the car while it’s lifted and you’ll see the same thing.

    The Murciélago as well? Only the LP640 or the original model too? I can’t imagine the original 2001 Murciélago having fake exhaust tips…And, I think it’s rather cool if the exhausts shakes and moves around a little(!) when you stomp on the gas, like you can see with a Ferrari 360/F430 for instance. I also think the 2* 2 exhausts on vintage Ferrari models hanging under the bumper look great.
    The problem with the Lexus (and California) is that this setup not only is fake but also looks fake, drawing more attention to the fakeness.

    On another subject; Yamaha also made the V8 in the Volvo XC90/S80. They also tried their hand at making an F1 engine in the early 90s but the thing was notoriously unreliable and still not powerful enough. They pulled the project after just 2 or so years (it’s likely that no team wanted their engines anymore). I doubt they’d like to be reminded of that. They make some mean synthesizers though.

  • avatar
    Kurt.

    Don’t forget the Yamaha in the Fords of the 80’s…

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    I followed an IS-F about 2 months ago along the 401. Looked interesting from behind, but I became hypnotised by the tailpipes. Everything around me became an insignificant blur. I was completely focused on those pipes. It was a disturbing and pleasing sensation at the same time. Kinda like watching midget porn on the internet, but like with a car instead. You know?

  • avatar
    Strippo

    Kinda like watching midget porn on the internet, but like with a car instead. You know?

    Only too well.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    You guys are killing me. 5 stars for a car that is condemned for ugly styling, has no interior room and not the best handling. Even the name is dumb. F stands for fail.

  • avatar
    noreserve

    Bunter1:
    Imagine if they cut the platform a foot, pushed the engine back a bit and gave it swoopy body work and a 6M trans option. The resulting car (Supra?) would spank a base ‘Vette, might give a Z06 a run.

    And this would magically cut several tenths off of the 0-60 time how? The base C6 is 4.1 and the IS F is 4.4 in 0-60 (Car and Driver apples-to-apples testing). You’re not going to do it with the manual. In fact, that would cost you time to the 0.10 sec upshifts from the SDS 8-speed dual-clutch potato slicer.

    Move the engine all you want, but you better knock out some of that weight – around 600 lbs. The C6 is almost that much lighter and has 430 HP vs 416. Torque isn’t the IS F’s ballgame either at 371 – way up high in the curve. In fact, given the IS F’s power-to-weight ratio, the only thing saving it in the 0-60 is the SDS tranny.

    Nope, no spanking to be had here. I’d venture to say that the “base” C6 would be doling out the licks – at the nearest track.

  • avatar
    noreserve

    A few other things…

    It’s IS F, not IS-F. Not sure why, but that’s what Lexus uses on their website.

    The problem I have with the tailpipes is not that they are cosmetic/fake, but that they are stacked and look ridiculous. As in something only the Japanese could love.

    And those IS cars are too cramped inside. My friend and I took an IS 350 out for a short test drive that had both of us feeling like we were getting into a suit a size too small. That dark black interior didn’t help at all.

  • avatar
    like.a.kite

    psarhjinian:

    You misunderstand! I have nothing at all against the IS-F or F-anything. If they can build something that beats the Germans at their own game, more power to them, and to the brand.

    That said, vertical tailpipes look really stupid. That is all.

  • avatar
    Vorenus

    So… if this car’s so great, why isn’t there a less-lux Toyota equivalent?

    Oh, that’s right; having one would comprimise Toyota’s commitment to produce uninspiring transportation appliances *only*.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    I can overlook poor styling if the handling makes up for it, but, Wow, the handling better go all the way to 11.

    MTeator:
    The truth is, any exhaust other than a freaking straight pipe and a simple muffler is for show.

    Are you certain? Engines are (essentially) air pumps. More small tubes are often more efficient than one big tube. And don’t forget the emissions dance – who knows how that’s engineered.

  • avatar
    jkim23

    Yeah I don’t understand this car either. If I’m going to buy a Lexus, I’d want that buttery smooth ride and cocooon-like silence. If I want a midsize rocket I’d have to go with an M3 or CTS-V.

    Also, I agree with the previous posters about the backseat. Totally useless. I don’t get cars like the IS or Audi A4 that have four doors but totally useless back seats. I’ve had coupes that had more rear seat room.

  • avatar
    meefer

    Disclosure, I own the maddeningly slow IS250.

    For all the fake pipes people, let it go – get the tanabe aftermarket if that’s all that’s stopping you.

    I would have loved to get one instead of the 250 but in a car I put 25K miles a year on, $60K is silly (for now).

    That being said, I want to get a C6 next.

  • avatar
    johnthacker

    Also, I agree with the previous posters about the backseat. Totally useless. I don’t get cars like the IS or Audi A4 that have four doors but totally useless back seats.

    I take it you don’t get the A3 either?

    Well, if you’re 5’6″ like me and you always move the front seat up, then it’s not totally useless (and you have more rear leg room than measured). And since some drivers are short, there’s a market for these cars; other people can always buy larger cars. That sort of excuse seems more valid in the case of Japanese-designed cars (where average height is closer to mine) than German cars, though.

  • avatar
    scartooth

    Now that CORVETTE is SWEEEEEET. LIKE the challenger also. That Japanese car sucks.

  • avatar
    Lbart

    Fake tailpipes, Fake hood scoops and vents. They all seem to try to imply something they are not.

  • avatar
    heather5586

    Wow. I hated this article so bad that I had sign up to leave a review. Can’t we give Lexus a hand for designing a car that competes with the M3? Regardless of what you say, it does compare right along with the M3. Yeah, BMW has been around and proven themselves but the ISF is something to be proud of. I’ve owned a M3 and it was a fun car. I could do without the costly inspections and replacing the rear tires every 5,000! I’m a new owner of the 08 ISF and I must say, this car rocks!  The technology on the ISF passes up the M3- no questions asked. I prefer an automatic so I could care less the ISF doesn’t offer a manual. I drove the 02 M3 smg for years and that car was a raddle trap! I went on a long road trip with my boss who owns a 4 door 2008 BMW M3 and the ISF is way more fun! Anyone who says they don’t like the sound of the V8 under the hood of Lexus must be a moron!  I can’t believe all the rude remarks. Has everyone who says that Lexus sucks actually drove one? It’s easy to say a car sucks when you’re reading articles as crapy as this one but actually drive the car, you might change your mind. I bet my Lexus goes more miles with less issues than a M3 ever would. Anyways, good job Lexus. I love my car. Bring on the M3. I’m ready for a race and I’m not scared!


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