By on October 20, 2008

TTAC reader steronz writes:

“I’m sure you’re familiar with the advertising claim in the subject. I just noticed it on a billboard during my morning commute, sans question mark. I did a brief search to see if I could figure out what marketing math GM is using to back up this claim, but I’m coming up
dry. I did my own quick check on Edmunds and came up with the following list:

Chevy Honda Toyota
Aveo* 24-34 Fit 28-34 Yaris 29-36
Cobalt** 25-36 Civic 26-34 Corolla 28-37
HHR*** 21-30 CR-V? fail Matrix 26-33
Malibu 22-30 Accord 22-31 Camry**** 21-31
Malibu Hy 24-32 Accord Hy dead Camry Hy 33-34
Civic Hy 40-45 Prius 48-45

* GM may be trying to bill the Aveo5 and the Aveo as two different models. I’m not buying that.
** Cobalt numbers are for the elusive XFE model, but that shouldn’t make a difference
*** GM may be trying to bill the HHR Panel Van as a different model than the HHR, but I’m REALLY not buying that
**** If GM is indeed playing tricks with model counting, the Camry Solara could potentially count as a separate model here

I’m not even sure if I feel comfortable calling hybrid versions of regular cars as new models, but since it doesn’t give anyone an advantage, I’ll allow it. Therefore, by my count, Chevy has 5 models, Honda has 4, and Toyota has 6. Claim busted, right?”

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34 Comments on “Ask The Best and Brightest: Does Chevy have more 30mpg models than Honda or Toyota?...”


  • avatar
    sean362880

    Monte Carlo LS get 31 MPG highway.

    If you count the Aveo / Aveo5 as two models (dubious), then Chevy ties Toyota.

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    If you go to this link:

    http://www.chevrolet.com/fuelefficiency/

    you can see that the Aveo (4/5 door), Cobalt (XFE/standard), Malibu (hybrid/standard) and HHR (panel/standard) are all being double counted, which gives Chevy a total of 8 cars above 30mpg highway.

    Let’s see:

    Toyota:

    Prius
    Yaris: 3 door, 4 door, 5 door
    Corolla: 4 door
    Matrix: 5 door
    Camry: standard, hybrid
    Camry Solara

    Well, that gives Toyota 9, they still win.

  • avatar
    miked

    Here’s data from the EPA. I just defined models in the same way that EPA does.

    To verify for yourself go to http://www.fueleconomy.gov and do a search for cars over 30 MPG.

    2009 Audi TT Coupe 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic (S6), Premium
    Audi = 1
    2009 Chevrolet Aveo 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Aveo 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Aveo 5 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Aveo 5 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Cobalt 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Cobalt XFE 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Chevrolet HHR FWD 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Gasoline or E85
    2009 Chevrolet HHR Panel FWD 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Gasoline or E85
    2009 Chevrolet Malibu 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (S6), Regular
    2009 Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    Chevrolet = 10
    2009 Ford Escape Hybrid FWD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Ford Focus FWD 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Ford Focus FWD 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Ford = 3
    2009 Honda Accord 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Honda Accord Coupe 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Honda Civic 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Honda Civic 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Honda Civic CNG 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 5-spd, CNG
    2009 Honda Civic Hybrid 4 cyl, 1.3 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Honda Fit 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Automatic (S5), Regular
    2009 Honda Fit 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Honda Fit 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Honda = 9
    2009 Hyundai Accent 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Accent 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Elantra 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Elantra 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Elantra Touring 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Sonata 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Hyundai Sonata 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Hyundai = 7
    2009 Kia Optima 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Kia Optima 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Kia Rio 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Kia Rio 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Kia Spectra 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    Kia = 5
    2009 Mazda 3 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Mazda Tribute Hybrid 2WD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    Mazda = 2
    2009 Mercedes-Benz E320 Bluetec 6 cyl, 3 L, Automatic 7-spd, Diesel
    MB = 1
    2009 Mercury Mariner Hybrid FWD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    Mercury = 1
    2009 MINI Clubman 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic (S6), Premium
    2009 MINI Clubman 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI Clubman S 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic (S6), Premium
    2009 MINI Clubman S 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI Cooper 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic (S6), Premium
    2009 MINI Cooper 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI Cooper S 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic (S6), Premium
    2009 MINI Cooper S 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI John Cooper Works 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI John Cooper Works Clubman 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 MINI John Cooper Works Convertible 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    MINI = 11
    2009 Nissan Altima 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Nissan Altima 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 6-spd, Regular
    2009 Nissan Altima Coupe 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Nissan Altima Coupe 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 6-spd, Regular
    2009 Nissan Altima Hybrid 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Nissan Versa 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Nissan Versa 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Nissan Versa 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 6-spd, Regular
    Nissan = 8
    2009 Pontiac G3 Wave 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G3 Wave 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G3 Wave 5 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G3 Wave 5 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G5 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G5 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G5 GT 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G5 GT 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G5 XFE 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac G6 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (S6), Regular
    2009 Pontiac Vibe 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Pontiac Vibe 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Pontiac = 12
    2009 Saturn Astra 2DR Hatchback 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Saturn Astra 4DR Hatchback 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Saturn Aura 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (S6), Regular
    2009 Saturn Aura Hybrid 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Saturn Vue Hybrid 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    Saturn = 5
    2009 Scion xD 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Scion xD 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Scion = 2
    2009 smart fortwo convertible 3 cyl, 1 L, Automatic (S5), Premium
    2009 smart fortwo coupe 3 cyl, 1 L, Automatic (S5), Premium
    smart = 2
    2009 Suzuki SX4 Sedan 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    Suzuki = 1
    2009 Toyota Camry 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Camry 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Camry Hybrid 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Toyota Corolla 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Corolla 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Matrix 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Matrix 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Prius 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Automatic (variable gear ratios), Regular
    2009 Toyota Yaris 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular
    2009 Toyota Yaris 4 cyl, 1.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular
    Toyota = 10
    2009 Volkswagen Eos 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 Volkswagen GTI 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic (S6), Diesel
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Diesel
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta SportWagon 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic (S6), Diesel
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta SportWagon 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Diesel
    2009 Volkswagen Jetta SportWagon 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    2009 Volkswagen Passat CC 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium
    VW = 9

    Final Tally:
    Audi = 1
    Chevrolet = 10
    Ford = 3
    Honda = 9
    Hyundai = 7
    Kia = 5
    Mazda = 2
    MB = 1
    Mercury = 1
    MINI = 11
    Nissan = 8
    Pontiac = 12
    Saturn = 5
    Scion = 2
    smart = 2
    Suzuki = 1
    Toyota = 10
    VW = 9

    Top few:
    Pontiac
    MINI
    Chevy, Toyota
    Honda, VW

  • avatar

    Honda, and probably Toyota would win even bigger if you made a comparison in terms of fleet average.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I’d say that yes, the hybrids should count as different models (Malibu, Malibu Hybrid), powertrain options could count but probably ought not to, except as a “foot in the door” (ie, the Camry isn’t disqualified by the V6), but no, reskins should definitely not count (Cobalt, G5).

    Remember, GM has a lot of brands and reskins to play with: Aveo, G3, Cobalt, G5, Astra, Malibu, G6, Aura. That’s eight cars, but only three platforms.

    Toyota, by comparison: Yaris xD, Corolla, Matrix, Camry, Solara, Prius. Six cars, four platforms, but there are significant differences between the Yaris, xD and Yaris sedan, as well as the Camry and Solara.

    Honda has even fewer: Fit, Civic, Accord, TSX. You can add the CSX in Canada. Three plaforms, same as GM.

    Remember GM’s claim about releasing, what was it, thirteen hybrids in a given amount of time? It’s an easy task when you consider that, were GM to hybridize every GMT900, they’d be more than halfway there without straying from a single platform/powertrain pair.

  • avatar

    @ Miked

    big double, triple, quadruple, quintuple counting issue

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    sean362880: The Monte Carlo was put out of its misery in ’07 and gets 29 highway under the new fuel economy measurements.

    Even if we count this legitimately Toyota wins:

    Aveo
    Cobalt/HHR
    Malibu

    A total of 3 platforms.

    vs:

    Prius
    Yaris
    Corolla/Matrix
    Camry

    A total of 4 platforms.

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    Does GM still have some SUVs that make the E85 loophole cut? That may be where they come up with it.

    I follow road test mpg specs a fair bit and this is my take FWIW.

    In road tests GM has ZERO vehicles that consistently get or even occasionaly get 30mpg in all around use. I’ve seen one test where an Aura Hybrid got 30+ (most test they are 25-26 normal 4cyl midsize territory). That’s it. Period.
    No other models at all. Zip.

    Honda-Fit and Civic (reg) regularly score 30+mpg in tests. Civic Hy normally around 40mpg.

    Toyota- Corrolla and Yaris over 30 normally, Yaris sometimes near 40 (38?). Prius-duh! 45 typical.

    On the road GM is no where close to those two.

    Bunter

  • avatar
    miked

    @David – any metric you come up with for “counting models” is going to be flawed. That’s why this is worthy of an Ask the Best and Brightest. I figured, we might as well just go with the way the government classifies models.

    Some people are arguing that the Hybrid should be counted as a different model but then why not a I4 vs V6? They all have different drive train.

  • avatar
    rm

    I think you need to expand your GM horizons and look at the multiplicative goodness that is badge engineering and platform sharing.

    On the other hand, you can go to GM’s own website and they’ll tell you how they come up with this. Yes, the Aveo and Aveo5 are two models as is the HHR and HHR Panel. Don’t forget the Pontiac G5 and the Cobalt twins: sedan and coupe.

    In the end, Honda and Toyota don’t have three or four worthless brands they can pawn cloned Civics and Corollas on.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Have you noticed the annoying commercials that car companies do now where they same something like “model x has more mpgs than the competition? MPG stands for Miles Per Gallon, not Mile Per Gallons. It should be “gets better MPG” or at worst ms-pg.

  • avatar
    virages

    RF, can you put the stats in Table format, that would make the thing much more readable. Anyway, what was this I heard about “Lies, damn lies and statistics”?

    In anycase this really doesn’t make much sense… should we be looking at mpg for total vehicles sold, percent of vehicles…? The truth is that Honda and Toyota used to get vastly superior milage than their Detroit counterparts, and now they’re just about the same, but just with higher quality.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    Who really cares? Does the fact that Chevy has more models that can get 30 hwy make you want to run out and buy an Aveo? The environmentalist crowd still isn’t going to forgive them for the SUV heavy portion of their fleet. Just like how Toyota gets a pass on their own giant SUV’s & trucks because they have the poster child green car – Prius.

    GM marketing needs to find something new.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    GM marketing needs to find something new.

    Yes, like new people. GM’s Marketing and Planning is second only in ineptitude to Ford’s, and that’s only because GM shouts louder.

  • avatar
    steronz

    I’m the one who submitted this question. Thanks for everyone’s responses.

    The first thing I’d like to note is that the claim is Chevy models, not GM models, so we don’t have to fret of Pontiac G3s and G5s and Auras and the like.

    The second thing is that no_slushbox’s link appears to clear things up for me. I looked around the internet, but I didn’t think to try the corporate site. It looks like they’re claiming 8 models, 2 each of the Aveo, HHR, Cobalt, and Malibu.

    Personally, I think that’s complete bullshit. I agree with others here that “more models” is a meaningless claim even if it were true, but if you’re gonna make the claim, at least have it be true. Using the same nebulous logic GM uses to differentiate the Aveo from the Aveo5 (technically it’s a different model name, unlike the Yaris sedan versus 3 door, which both share the name “Yaris”), we get:

    1. Yaris
    2. Corolla (two engine offerings, but somehow the XFE is it’s own model for some reason)
    3. Matrix
    4. Camry
    5. Camry Hybrid
    6. Camry Solara (hey, it’s a different model name)
    7. Prius

    Which means that GM isn’t technically lying. However, I don’t see how any sane person can agree with that criteria for counting models. By every metric that counts (platforms, recognizable models with colloquial names, EPA classifications), Toyota either beats Chevy or ties.

  • avatar
    1996MEdition

    Statistics is the art of massaging data to get a number your boss wants…..

    It’s a proven fact that 83% of facts are made up…..

  • avatar
    tms1999

    Even if the claim is true with not so much logic stretching, even if the benchmark standard was not quite irrelevant (the number of models that get 30+ MPG in a narrowly defined set of test conditions), does this kind of advertisement make people run to Chevy dealership to buy an Aveo instead of a Yaris/Fit or a Malibu instead of a Camcord?

    It’s probably good to know that some GM’s models match the competition in some way. But it certainly is not enough to sell their cars.

  • avatar
    Jonathan I. Locker

    All EPA MPG statistics are made up of three numbers. City, Highway, and then mixed.

    I find it disingenuous to be spending so much time on focusing on a round number (30) and then only focusing on one of the three EPA numbers (highway MPG).

    It is easy to make a care that gets half-way decent mileage on the highway. You make a tall last gear, and then make sure your engine has enough low end torque to move the car in that last gear on a level highway.

    Due to the fact that the great majority of cars will drive in city only, or at best mixed driving, then focusing on the highway MPG is actually a distraction from the real issue. Who makes the most MPG friendly fleet of products for the consumer?

    So perhaps the question should be not “who has more 30 mpg models,” but rather “who has the best mixed MPG fleet?” Or “who actually sells the most or higher percentage of mixed MPG vehicles?”

    And this fixation on the highway MPG is a form of deceptive marketing. Tell someone that their Chevy Malibu will get 30 MPG, and they get 20 MPG around town is misleading without focusing on the HIGHWAY portion of the MPG number.

  • avatar
    miked

    @Jonathan – I think the better question is “Who has a model that I want to buy.” I don’t care how many models you make that that meet a narrow set of criteria. I care that there’s an overlap between what you sell and what I want to buy.

  • avatar
    shaker

    What bugs me is HWY MPG can give certain cars an advantage, especially if they just tweak the final drive ratio, which (in most 4 cyl cars) compromises performance.
    I wish all carmakers were forced by the EPA to make the average the “big” number in their advertising.

  • avatar
    rev0lver

    The new tactic here in Canada is to measure MPG using British gallons.

    GM is the only one I’ve seen advertising like this but I’m guessing they’re not the only ones.

    Vibe is rated at 29/39 MPG
    HHR is rated at 31/46 MPG
    (From GM Canada website)

    The average consumer will more than likely have
    no idea of the differing units used between manufacturers.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Honda has a frequently seen tv commercial for the 09 Fit proclaiming a spectacular “33 mpg highway”.

    Wow…only 4 less than grandma’s Cobalier.

    Than again with gas at 2 bucks a gallon, does anybody really care.

  • avatar
    steronz

    indi500fan –

    That’s one of the reasons I hate how GM uses the XFE for advertising, when apparently nobody actually buys an XFE (which comes with a manual only, and is hard to actually find on dealer lots). A plain jane automatic cobalt gets 24/33 on the EPA cycle, and that’s the car that 98% of Cobalt buyers are gonna end up with.

    That’s not to say that the Fit’s numbers aren’t a bit disappointing given the size.

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    Ignoring the petty game of how to count different models there are three logical problems with Chevy’s argument:

    1) People do not only drive on the highway.
    2) What should matter is which manufacturer has the car in a particular “class” with the best mileage.
    3) People in the US unfortunately don’t drive stick shift (sadly I think automatics are about 90% of sales), so the stick only XFE models are not worth considering; below I only list automatic transmission cars:

    Using that logic:

    Pure Hybrid:

    Toyota Prius: 46 mpg combined

    B class:

    Toyota Yaris: 31 mpg combined

    Honda Fit: 31 mpg combined

    Kia Rio: 30 mpg combined

    Nissan Versa: 29 mpg combined

    Hyundai Accent: 29 mpg combined

    Scion xD: 28 mpg combined

    Chevy Aveo/Pontiac G3 (3 and 5 door): 28 mpg combined

    C class:

    Toyota Corolla: 30 mpg combined

    Honda Civic: 29 mpg combined

    Mini Cooper/Clubman: 29 mpg combined

    Hyundai Elantra: 28 mpg combined

    Nissan Sentra: 28 mpg combined

    Ford Focus: 27 mpg combined

    Chevy Cobalt/Pontiac G5: 27 mpg combined

    C class wagon:

    Toyota Matrix: 28 mpg combined

    Chevy HHR: 25 mpg combined

    C class Hybrid/Diesel:

    Honda Civic Hybrid: 42 mpg combined

    Volkswagen Jetta Diesel: 33 mpg combined

    D class:

    Nissan Altima: 26 mpg combined

    Chevy Malibu/Pontiac G6/Saturn Aura: 26 mpg combined

    Hyundai Sonata: 25 mpg combined

    Toyota Camry: 25 mpg combined

    D class Hybrid:

    Nissan Altima Hybrid: 34 mpg combined

    Toyota Camry Hybrid: 34 mpg combined

    Chevy Malibu/Saturn Aura Hybrid: 29 mpg combined

    In every category except midsize sedans GM is at the bottom.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    The Fit is already subject to the bloat that people complain about re: Honda.

    It’s a bit bigger, bit more horsepower, bit more features.

    It’s nice inside, for sure. And the economy is still really good. But its definitely trying to be the most luxurious subcompact less than 20,000, and not an econobox.

  • avatar
    jimble

    The fueleconomy.gov search is a little odd… if you ask for cars that get “over 30″ mpg highway it gives you cars that literally get MORE THAN 30 mpg, not including cars that get exactly 30 mpg. Presumably GM means to include cars that get AT LEAST 30 mpg. The following cars get EXACTLY 30 mpg:

    Acura TSX 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (S5)
    Audi A3 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd
    Audi A4 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic
    Audi A4 Quattro 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 6-spd
    Audi TT Roadster 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic (S6)
    Chevrolet Cobalt 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd
    Chevrolet HHR FWD 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Chevrolet HHR FWD 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd
    Chevrolet HHR Panel FWD 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Chevrolet HHR Panel FWD 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd
    Chevrolet Malibu 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Chrysler Sebring 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Dodge Caliber 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd
    Honda Accord 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 5-spd
    Honda Accord Coupe 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 5-spd
    Hyundai Elantra Touring 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic
    Kia Spectra 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd
    Mazda 3 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic (S4)
    Mazda 6 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic (S5)
    Mitsubishi Lancer 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd
    Nissan Sentra 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic
    Pontiac G6 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Saturn Astra 2DR Hatchback 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Saturn Astra 4DR Hatchback 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Suzuki SX4 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Suzuki SX4 Sedan 4 cyl, 2 L, Manual 5-spd
    Suzuki SX4 Sport 4 cyl, 2 L, Automatic 4-spd
    Toyota Corolla 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic (S5)
    Toyota Corolla 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Manual 5-spd
    Volkswagen Jetta 5 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd
    Volkswagen Jetta SportWagon 5 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd
    Volkswagen Rabbit 5 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd

    Add these cars to the ones listed above and you get 16 for Chevy and only 11 for Honda and 12 for Toyota. The claim may be irrelevant but at least it isn’t false.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    The HHR gets counted 4 times?

    C’mon.

    But hey, whatever, GM is the king of having 4 different variations of the same model with 30+ gas mileage. Point granted. I’m also the smartest, handsomest, most talented, and best endowed man (in my room at the moment).

    Hurrah for GM.

  • avatar
    jayparry

    “Chevy offers more models than anyone with an EPA estimated 30 MPG highway or better. More than Toyota, more than Honda, more than anyone.”

    The 8 are right here on their website and its even worse than you think http://www.chevrolet.com/fuelefficiency/

    1. Aveo5
    2. Aveo Sedan
    3. Cobalt
    4. Cobalt XFE
    5. Malibu
    6. Malibu Hybrid
    7. HHR
    8. HHR Panel

    Its 4 models with two trims (only one with a hybrid engine option). There are only 8 so they must be doing their own ‘math’ with regards to toyota and their trim levels.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    indi500fan> Not sure where you live, but gas is $3.45-$3.70 EVERYWHERE here (Chicago). Anything under $3.40 has unbelievably long lines.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Gas is 2.40 a gal here in Indiana
    My SIL says it’s 2.25 in Missouri

    I hereby declare the above discussion to be yesterday’s problem.

    Let’s move ahead to something useful, like will Mahindra offer a supercharged Hemi after they buy the H2?

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Robstar, All you have to do is head out of town a ways. Gas is $2.95 or thereabouts in Madison, WI. Of course, we were there the other day and thought $2.95 was ridiculously expensive… it’s $2.54 here in the Twin Cities.

    Yes, the price differential strikes me as crazy.

    And… $2.54 here… while we just RAISED our gas tax earlier this year. Go figure.

    My best guess on why we’re so cheap… we have a couple refineries here. Perhaps transport, distribution, inventory and mixing costs help keep the price low.

    On the original topic… I’ll bet you could flip the question over and demonstrate, conclusively, that GM had way more models getting UNDER 25mpg than Toyota. Not that GM would want to advertise that fact. Bonus: several of GM’s gas-guzzlers are hybrids. That’s smart marketing!

  • avatar
    davey49

    I’m guessing that Cobalt Sedan and Cobalt Coupe are counted separately.
    We really need a fuel mileage to weight ratio. People will say that a hybrid SUV is pointless but a big car that tows 6000# and gets 20 city is fairly impressive.

  • avatar
    yankinwaoz

    For a humorous analogy of GM spending resources on manipulating numbers for meaningless marketing, I recommend that you watch Apple’s new TV ad “Bean Counter”. I hope you will understand the analogy.

    Just so you know where their priorities are.

  • avatar

    Hey, at least they aren’t counting the friggin’ Volt yet.


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