By on May 5, 2022

Acura has announced that production of the much-anticipated 2023 Integra has officially commenced in Marysville, Ohio. Deliveries of the iconic nameplate are said to commence in June and orders can be placed now.

But with pricing having revealed the starting MSRP of $31,895 — over three grand more than the mechanically similar Honda Civic Si — one wonders if the public interest has held strong. We now know that we’re effectively getting a revamped version of the ILX (also based on the Civic) with a steeper price tag and a more desirable name. The Integra comes with a 200-horsepower turbocharged 1.5-liter inline-four, mated to either a continuously variable automatic (CVT) or a six-speed manual transmission. But the CVT is standard, forcing customers that want a manual to spend $36,895 (including destination) for the A-Spec — which also comes with adaptive dampers, sportier looks, a limited-slip differential, and Acura’s technology package. 

While the tech niceties are probably sufficient in justifying the price bump, every version of the Integra still comes with 200-hp and 192 lb-ft of torque driving the front wheels. This may make it difficult to rationalize for those seeking a performance bargain, as there are quicker vehicles priced very near the Integra. While the majority of these are small hatchbacks and base-trimmed performance coupes utilizing turbocharged fours, there are also several V6-powered sedans hovering around $35,000.

It may not be entirely fair to call the Nissan Maxima a sports car. But the model does offer a 300-hp, 3.5-liter V6 for roughly the same money as the A-Spec. We are dubious that it’ll be able to hang with the Integra squealing around corners and are disappointed it also comes with a CVT. But it’s a very comfortable cruiser and likely to embarrass the Acura in a straight line.

Toyota also sells V6-powered versions of the Camry and consumers may still find leftover examples of the criminally underrated 2022 Avalon for roughly $35,000 on the same lot. Subaru has even softened the all-wheel-drive WRX to make it more adept at daily driving for the 2023 model year — and it’s almost assured to be the quicker car when lined up alongside the upcoming Integra. But if creature comforts are less important, Honda offers the nearly identical Civic Si for $28,315 and the 306-hp Type-R retails (without dealer markups) for roughly the same amount as Acura’s A-Spec.

Where exactly is the Integra supposed to find its niche? Honda has a solid reputation for delivering models that don’t appear all that impressive on paper and still manage to become legendary performance vehicles for offering high levels of satisfaction from behind the wheel. But the Integra looks to be little more than a direct replacement for the ILX, running with an emissions-friendly 1.5-liter (rather than the ILX’s 2.4-liter) and loaded up with tech. Only a portion of the recipe appears to be directed at the hardcore enthusiasts salivating over their rose-tinted memories of the previous Integra — leaving us with a model that’s effectively the luxury variant of the Civic Si.

If that’s to be the case, there’s little doubt that the 2023 Acura Integra will be a ball of fun when tossed around a corner. But it’s hard to see it shining quite so brightly when the Hyundai Elantra N and Volkswagen Jetta GLI are lurking nearby with lower price tags. Obviously, we need to see it dance before making any real conclusions. Though this nagging feeling that the market for a near-premium sedan with sporting pretensions might not be as robust as the automaker needs has persisted.

Maybe we’re all just waiting for that Type-R engine to drop. But what say you? Are you still interested in the upcoming Acura or is the Integra just the next ILX leveraging a nostalgic name?

[Images: Acura]

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68 Comments on “Still Interested? 2023 Acura Integra Enters Production...”


  • avatar
    tsarcasm

    $40,000 for a civic, with 200hp…..dream on.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Bingo! That is CTR money!

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        In an normal world, that’s CTR money. But with Civic Sis going for $10,000 over sticker, it’s anyone’s guess on a couple of things:
        What is the 2023 CTR going to cost? Without markups, I’m thinking around $45,000.
        What are the markups on the Integra?

        You can bet that Honda is going to try to create a gap between the Integra and new CTR and then a gap between the CTR and the has to be coming Integra Type-R.

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          My local Honda dealer has an empty lot – no stock is visible at all. Their website has nine vehicles listed as available, which must be inside the showroom. Bring in a dozen Integras and most likely they will sell at whatever price they decide to offer them at.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    From a Honda corporate standpoint, it’s a guaranteed moneymaker. The big price premium more than pays for the development and marketing cost. And it gives the Acura stores something that’s not a CUV. If each US store sells 5 a month, it’s 15,000+ cars a year.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I bought a TSX because the seats in a Accord didn’t support my legs as well. Save a few thousand is always good, but I don’t want to be uncomfortable the next 10+ years I drive the car.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “leaving us with a model that’s effectively the luxury variant of the Civic Si.”

    I’m pretty sure that’s what they are going for. I think the only mistake is putting the manual behind a trim paywall.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    F

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Oh, yeah, totally interested. Who cares that it’s an overpriced Civic with a CVT that my GLI will lay waste to?

    If I order mine now I get a NFT!!!

    Color me PUMPED!!!!!
    youtube.com/watch?v=C0SjUfzl04c

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      I wish I understood what the actual f**k an NFT was.

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      Having been a VW owner, there’s a price premium to not having to deal with the inevitable issues VWs have.

      I’ve owned two, and I can’t bring myself to do it again.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        What years/models VW, and what issues?

        I have two GTI, a 2017 and a 2018. Zero issues to date.

        Zero.

        I went in eyes wide open telling myself some weirdness was OK. Instead what I got was no weirdness at all, and a couple of cars FAR better than what today’s Honda can ever hope to imagine.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          The anonymous internet commenter guarantee is as a good as gold.

        • 0 avatar
          theflyersfan

          And mine was a heaping pile of flaming garbage that couldn’t be fixed at 19,000 miles. And I’ve had Acuras and Hondas that have made it to over 200,000 miles with basic maintenance and replacement of usual wear items.

          YMMV

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            I’d definitely go with the 200K+ Honda product. A zero-issue VW is an aberration.

            I see Acura selling 20-25k of these a year in the same part of the market from 30 years ago – upscale Honda for a reasonable price premium. If I was a sedan/hatchback guy I’d look closely….

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @flyersfan:
            True, but about 99.9% of VWs aren’t the second coming of Christine like yours was. I’m on my third, and I have had no major issues with any of them (knock on wood).

            And I know people who’ve had nothing but problems with their Hondas.

            If I were looking for something to drive for the next 15 years, I’d probably take a Honda over a VW, but that’s not how I do stuff.

            Like you say…YMMV.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            @Freed- I’m one of those people that have had nothing but problems with both Honda’s we’ve owned. Our first was a 1999 Accord EX-L 4cyl purchased new, dealer serviced religiously, and by the time it had 110k miles, it was eating its third transmission and cost me over $2,000 over the course of 5k miles to get the CEL to go off finally. Next was a 2012 Pilot EX-L, purchased CPO from Honda with 40k miles in 2015. By the time it got to 85k, it was riddled with VTM vibration issues, bearing glitter in the oil pan, and potentially a trans slippage- admittedly I never had it diagnosed because we traded it in for a 2017 Explorer and never looked back.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            And I had a Honda van that sh!t the bed with 73K gentle mom miles, and American Honda had decided at that point–2009–to do away completely with their goodwill warranty.

            Despite knowing full well that they had spent 8 years building glass transmissions, to the point of Chrysler saying “dang, dude…”

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What’s in it for the criminals not to sabotage your vehicle, especially once they know how “religious” you are? That’s assuming competence, but I won’t use dealer service except in case of “major” warranty repairs, but I haven’t had any with several new F-series, personal/commercial.

            Obviously they’re not god’s Gift, like heavenly Hondas and Toyotas, not to mention lots of abuse/hard use, and I’m positive it’s directly from servicing them myself, in-house and independents. Just save your receipts.

        • 0 avatar
          QBinMA

          Same. I’m on my 3rd VAG product and all have been extremely reliable, with the most recent being a MK7 GTI. I’ve also owned 6 Hondas. All the ones made before 2005 were awesome. After that, not so much. Some people still haven’t come to grips with the fact that the legendary Honda reliability of the 80’s and 90’s really doesn’t exist anymore.

  • avatar

    Uhh. The ILX has an eight-speed DCT as its standard motivator since 2016. So now it transfers to this Integra and gets downgraded to CVT? What?

    The ILX was outdated but had a larger engine and similar figures to the new Integra.

    Integra: 1.5, 200hp, 192 lb-ft $31-35k
    ILX: 2.4, 201hp, 180 lb-ft $26-32k

    I’m not seeing it just for the manual.

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      Hence my “F in the chat” for the Integra. I also went on a diatribe not long ago about Acura not wanting to continue with the ill-selling ILX, so instead they gave us a less adequate car and disgraced it with the Integra name and hoped all will be well.

      F

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The ILX is powered by the multiport K24 N/A whose engine family goes back to 2001. The new Integra is powered by the DI L15CA with turbozzz which dates to 2015. Guess which one will be on the road longer?

    • 0 avatar

      Yep this seems dumb. The CVT just does not make much sense in this class.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      Hmm, you are making a lot of sense here, Corey. I wonder if this came up in Acura’s product planning meetings, and if so, what their conclusions were? :)

      To quote Perd Hapley, “My interest level … is medium.”

      It’s not as bad as I feared, but no better than I expected. If that makes sense.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      My wife was interested in ILX A-Spec. Blue with red interior. I was happy she liked the A-spec, red interior not so much. I said let’s go look at a Mazda3 AWD turbo or CX-5. She likes what she likes, now I can’t even find a Honda Civic in Acura clothing Blue with red interior A-Spec ILX.
      I sure hope she does not like the Integra as I draw the line at CVT and I’m not a fan of the 1.5.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Acura completely “had relations with the dog” on this one!

      As I’ve griped here and on Temple of VTEC, the original Integra was a slightly nicer car on a Civic chassis, with all of the goodness inherent. Basically Accord-spec execution. And no cutting of equipment on either car! Better engine, etc., as expected.

      Honda also sold an Acura CSX in Canada only. It was the 8th-Gen Civic with nicer leather, automatic climate control, and red IP lighting. Made no bones about what it was!

      Now we’re in THE_CURRENT_YEAR! First, the Civic Si comes out with the less-powerful engine, and more importantly, LACKING EQUIPMENT from the previous-generation Si! No adaptive dampers, no dual-zone automatic climate control! Both of which you can get on the Civic Touring Sedan or Sport Touring hatch! What in the world?! What are they up to?

      Then we see stuff about the new Integra drip out! And it appears that indeed, Honda cut stuff on the Si so as to not step on the Integra! Then we see the actual powertrain stuff! (::Facepalm!!::)

      All they did is take a theoretical Civic Si hatchback and did the same thing that they did to make the CSX! Exactly the same interior with worse leather (vinyl), dual-zone climate control and a better stereo! No powertrain upgrades, and to not be stuck with the CVT, you have to go top-drawer! Honda should have done something, ANYTHING, to put more differentiation into the Integra! A K20 in Accord tune would have been fine as a start in this Integra, while the identical engine to the upcoming Type-R going into the Type-S would have been perfect! It was always an assumption that the Integra Type-S might have a softer suspension tune to be more “adult,” so we’ll see. My stomach turns at the thought of the upcoming Type-R, and what’s going to be chopped out of there so that Honda can offer an Integra Type-S for thousands more!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I have a feeling that this model has been going to lunch (and dinner) with her girlfriends from Mazda. When and if Honda decides to publish the curb weight, we shall see.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    My guess? 3197lbs. Can’t wait to see how close I am.

  • avatar
    6250Claimer

    I loved my ’88 Integra back in the day. This thing? Not even remotely.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    yawn. In a world with GTI and GLI, this thing is amazingly…nothing.

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      Reliable is the word you’re looking for.

      People like the Civic Si. This is basically taking that, giving you more creature comforts, lengthening it slightly, and giving it a hatch.

      Frankly, the only real issue with it is that it doesn’t have SH-AWD. Hopefully that’ll show up in the Type-S version.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        I have reliable. By 2016, VW figured things out. That’s the secret that the world has yet to (a) hear, or (b) acknowledge.

        I say that as a former Honda fanboi who had his eyes pulled WIDE open by American Honda business fsckery, who then went and bought a 2017 GTI. And based on that, I added a 2018 GTI to the stable. Both cars running great, no problems with either of them today.

        Zero problems.

        These cars are what Honda dreams it builds, before it wakes up and then builds the crap they sell today.

        • 0 avatar
          Garrett

          And yet Honda is far above VW in Consumer Reports reliability.

        • 0 avatar
          theflyersfan

          @jalop1991 – I get it. You hate Honda. But your arguments aren’t backed up by real world data.
          Facts:
          VW repairs are more frequent and far more expensive when the warranty expires and you’re on the hook.
          Look up VW wiper motors, exterior light failures, ABS sensors, electrical ground issues and power window problems. There’s a lot of issues there.
          Honda interiors don’t have soft-touch plastics that crack and tear after five years.
          And one of the most damning – Honda didn’t have to lie to the entire world about how clean their cars’ exhaust is. I still saw VW got off way too easy on that one.

          And if you think they are still ultra reliable, I’m pretty sure you can contact the service managers at Bachman VW and Neil Huffman VW and they will very much remember a Pure Gray GLI that they couldn’t fix. And I guarantee given how the brand new GTI felt, I think we can kick that quality score right down into the gutter.

          The VW we all remember from the early 2000s is long past dead. Every single one of their cars feels like it has been bled down to the last penny and Euro in order to make a price point. Plastic trim isn’t supposed to fall off of the dashboard in a new car. The entire passenger door and half of the dash isn’t supposed to squeak and rattle at 8,000 miles. But when you use the most hollow plastics barely held together by a hope and prayer, what do you expect?

          I got that car because I really liked the engine/transmission combo. It’s a lot of fun and efficient at the same time. It’s too bad the rest of the car had to come with it.

          So you can trash Honda and Acura all you want – until the Trumpists totally take over, there’s still free speech. But looking around with the eye test, I see far more 10 year old Hondas and Acuras in good condition compared to VWs.

          And then we get to the Integra. I had an Integra and a couple RSX Type-Ss. All crazy reliable and a lot of fun with those great manual transmissions. This one leaves me very cold. I’m not a fan of the rear – it reminds me of the BMW 2-series where the rear, and it’s tough to pinpoint, doesn’t look like it fits the car or that the designers weren’t talking to each other or they had some ideas and tried to cram them all into one.

          There’s a lot of competition at that price point, with pretty much all of them having more power, larger size, (possibly) lower dealer markup, etc. There was enough of a difference between the Civic and the Integra/RSX to make it feel special. Not sure that true in this case.

          • 0 avatar
            kcflyer

            Good info ruined by TDS.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t think 1-2 super-reliable anecdotal vehicles save a brand’s reputation but I also don’t think 1-2 anecdotal lemon law nightmares definitively sully it.

            The places that compile reliability statistics show Hondas tend to do better than VWs (although not always Acuras depending on the year). However, not everyone buying in this class is looking for a 10year/200k ownership experience and on average I don’t think a 5YO VW is going to be a Yugo. Some people just want to be fast and the VWs & Hyundais will almost certainly have better performance than this Intergra.

            If someone was interested in the Acura and they didn’t have a hard budget under $35K I’d say wait and see about a future version using the CTR engine.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            @kcflyer – sorry…still absolutely fuming over this past week of everything out of DC. I try to stay apolitical, but there are times when a step too far was taken and this is one of them.

            @ajla – you nailed exactly what I plan on doing a few years from now when it’s time for something larger than an MX-5. I love the CTR engine and transmission combo. I was willing to give the now previous gen one a pass on the exterior looks based on how it drove. But if Acura snags that combo and put it something a little more mature and comfortable, take my money please. I can put up with the kind of coupe/kind of hatchback design of the rear.

            Onto VW (again) – a colleague of mine had (recently got rid of it) a 2017 Jetta. It also ate through a set of wiper motors and if you mention driver’s side window to him, the twitch develops above the right eye. He also had the Corey Lewis issue with the sunroof and the joys of a damp interior that brought with it.
            Years ago, a friend of mine had a Jetta TDI. Exterior held up, and the lights kept working, but the interior was falling apart. Any soft touch areas where your arms and elbows would rest was already cracking and peeling after just a couple of years. Those normally aren’t problems that hit today’s cars. But FreedMike has had far better luck with his VW, along with other family members of mine with a new Tiguan, so hopefully that holds up. But, that being said, going from what FreedMike has posted, it’s like the Tiguan in that it’s leased. Yup, Volkswagen: F*** the next guy.

          • 0 avatar
            mountainman

            I’m more offended that you are a Flyers fan… sad.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            @mountainman – been one for over three decades now and it’s been a very rough few years. But we have Gritty, the creator of nightmares and PTSD in kids that were suddenly in the presence of the most horrifying mascot unleashed.

            And that includes the Phanatic next door.

            To give those non-Philadelphians here an idea of Philly hockey, the year was 1996. The new CoreStates Center (now Wells Fargo Center after what seems like more name changes than anyone can remember) had just opened. I was working in Philly and a friend/co-worker and me were going to the Rangers/Flyers game. I had my Lindros jersey and he had his Messier jersey. You don’t do that in Philly. I kept telling him to toss the jersey in the trunk. He didn’t. By the time the game was over, he was covered in nacho cheese, peanut shells, popcorn, spilled beer, and who knows what else. And Philly won. I can only imagine if we lost. And this is why the arena has a Rage Room.

          • 0 avatar
            Mustangfast

            It’s funny how those with TDS have to insert some reference into things completely unrelated

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            TDS? Is that a new term for “Trump’s Deranged Supporters”?

            Those folks hijack threads around here day in, day out.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “I’m more offended that you are a Flyers fan”

            You hate to see it happen to good people but, there it is.

        • 0 avatar
          Farhad

          I don’t know when they did what, but my 2015 CC has had zero issues up to now at 91000 Miles. I am not loyal to any brand, but my guess is most of the cars are pretty reliable these days.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Needz moar powah.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    I doubt anyone who was interested in Integra would be looking at V6 Camry and most definitely not Maxima. The car is exactly what it looks like, a car for Honda fans who likes fast Civic but don’t want to look like everyone else.

    No different than your Audi A3 and Acura RDX drivers, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

  • avatar
    AK

    Surprised to say it really does look a lot nicer than the SI (especially after that terrible yellow INTEGRA ‘prototype’ debut).

    Giving it the identical power rating of an SI is embarrassing though. An extra 20hp wouldn’t make it a world beater but it would at least show Acura doing something to add performance. As it is now, it just looks lazy.

    Its not a ‘numbers car’ but if this Integra can’t out perform an SI… that’s a big failure. If it gets walked by an ILX, even worse. I could see the base CVT trim out running the 6mt which again, would be embarrassing. Hope they surprise me.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    “Over three grand more than the mechanically similar Honda Civic Si” means that, for a little over a 10% price bump, I can have Acura service, Acura loaners, and a nicer interior with leather.

    A Mazda3 Premium costs $5600 more than the mechanically similar Mazda3 S, and you still have to spend time in a Mazda dealership. Why are people acting like this is unusual?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Check the pricing info above. The “three-grand-more” Integra has a CVT, which means it’s going to get outperformed by the Civic Si, and pretty much everything else in its’ class. If you want an Integra that runs like the Si, you need the manual model, which costs five grand more than the base Integra, so the price difference between that car and the Si is now eight grand. And at that price point, it’s up against stuff Audi, BMW and Mercedes, all of which have far more cred with luxury buyers.

      If the better service at the Acura place justifies that kind of price difference for you, then I suppose that’s your call. I just don’t see a big market for this car.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        “so the price difference between that car and the Si is now eight grand”

        Good sleuthing. My wagon fetish could be solved by something like a 5 door, but not when it’s a Civic Si for 8 grand more.

        It’s almost as though Honda doesn’t know there’s a GTI/GLI in existence.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The base Integra does not offer leather upholstery.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    If they had led with a Type-S, then yes. But only 200hp.? Pass.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    Has Honda sorted out the 1.5 turbo’s issues?

    The Honda DCT is reputed to be rock solid, The CVT not so much.

  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    I owned a 1990 Integra GS hatchback. I like the current Civic except for the CVT. I’m a bit worried about Honda’s long term turbo reliability. So a new Integra looked to be great news. I figured no way would Acura put out a car with the same CVT as the Civic.

    Surprise! This new Integra checks exactly zero boxes for me. I’d take a base Civic with the naturally aspirated engine over the Acura. Very disappointing.

    And I was actually in the market and would have seriously considered ordering an Integra. Instead I’m in a long wait for a hybrid Ford Maverick.

  • avatar
    PlaysInTraffic

    Meh. I lost interest when they said it would have the 1.5T engine, same as the Civic Si, and that the base model isn’t available with the manual.

    The 2.0T from the Accord should have been the base engine, available with the stick. I bought a 1st gen Integra new back in the day, and I distinctly remember that it had more hp than the Civic Si or the Accord LXi.

    That is why Acura was able to set the MSRP higher than that of the Si, more power to offset the higher curb weight.

    The Hyundai Elantra N stickers for less than the manual Integra, and has 70 hp more. The GTI/GLI have 30 hp more, with the GLI stickering for less. Sorry Honda, I would have loved to own another Integra that was at least worthy of the name, but this is just lame, and it tarnishes the nameplate. You should have just stuck with the ILX name if you weren’t willing to give it more hp than an Si, which is barely competitive itself.

  • avatar
    PlaysInTraffic

    I lost all interest when Acura announced it would have the 1.5 liter engine from the Civic Si, and that it was 3k extra for the manual.

    The 2.0 turbo from the Accord should have been the base engine, and been available with the stick. I bought a 1st gen Integra new back in the day, and I distinctly remember that it had more hp than the Civic Si or the Accord LXi.

    That is why Acura was able to set the MSRP higher than that of the Si, more power to offset the higher curb weight.

    The Hyundai Elantra N stickers for less than the manual Integra, and has 70 hp more. The GTI/GLI have 30 hp more, with the GLI stickering for less. Sorry Honda, I would have loved to own another Integra that was at least worthy of the name, but this is just lame, and it tarnishes the nameplate. You should have just stuck with the ILX name if you weren’t willing to give it more hp than an Si, which is barely competitive itself.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    Meh. If the current SI didn’t take apparently take a step forward in n/v/h and interior quality, I could see place for this. But I don’t think the allure of a hatchback SI is enough to make this a success. If I wanted a HB I’d order a base NA 6mt 2.0 Civic Sport for 24k.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Absolutely interested in the manual A-Spec/Tech version. Enough to pay $37k for it when I’m in the market sometime in 2023 or 2024? That depends on how my finances develop.

  • avatar

    I’m a repeat VW owner, and other than my TDi, bought back, never got a lemon…to be fair, I tend to over maintain my cars. No citrus though in VW land save the TDi. My one Acura product, the MDX, also good at 235k. Exhaust is rotting, second set of cats (expen$ive in NY State, we have some CA regs so you have to go to Stealer, thanks for nothing), have replaced a lot of wear parts, everything is EOL in any 200k plus car…Worst was the MDX had the transmission out twice at 60k miles for torque converter issues in the distant past, for which I had to fight the dealer, but under warranty. They also didn’t see the occasional miss, so I had to buy my own fresh coils. Beyond that, whenever the computer says do a maintenence, I did it, except for the timing belt, which was done professionally.

    I think for most cars without a time bomb like a CVT, it’s luck of the draw at the individual level. My one real lemon was spelled G-M, and the problem was great design but bad execution once we got to the GM parts bin-at least it cured me from ever wanting a Corvette. A shame too, as the second gen CTS with Sport steering (same as CTSV) and suspension settings was quite nice.

  • avatar
    Mustangfast

    Is there any luxury automaker using CVTs in their vehicles? And no, Infiniti doesn’t count

  • avatar
    Mustangfast

    Is there any luxury automaker using CVTs in their vehicles? And no, Infiniti doesn’t count

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