By on May 27, 2022

2022 Nissan LEAF SL Plus

160kW AC Electric Motor with 62 kWH battery (214 hp, 250 lb-ft torque @ 800rpm)

Single-speed transmission, front-wheel drive

114 city / 94 highway / 104 combined (EPA Rating, MPGe)

7.7 city / 6.6 highway / 7.2 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $38,375 US / $46,098 CAN

As Tested: $39,255 US / $46,678 CAN

Prices include $975 destination charge in the United States. Canadian prices do not include destination or delivery charges, and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

While I’m nobody’s idea of an environmentalist, I do my best to make an effort here and there to reduce my impact on the world at large. I recycle what I can. I try to choose products that are reusable where possible. I try to leave my thermostat reasonably cool during the winter and encourage my kids to follow President Carter’s advice to put on a damned sweater.

I live, however, almost exactly two hundred miles from Detroit – the font from which all of my media loan vehicles spew forth. Until quite recently, I was thus unable to sample electric cars such as this 2022 Nissan Leaf, since the advertised range wasn’t quite enough to get such a car to me. As such, the following shall be both an assessment of Nissan’s EV and of the state of charging infrastructure in non-coastal areas.

Let’s start with the car, as Nissan has managed to make an EV look not weird. You know how once you’ve bought something, you start seeing it everywhere? After having driven a Leaf for a week, I began to see them around a fair bit – and I wonder if I’d imagined they were simply an old Versa and thus immediately dismissed them as uninteresting. Nope, the Leaf blends into everyday traffic marvelously – which may be both a blessing and a curse.

After all, what’s the fun in doing something good without the ability to be smugly self-righteous about it? Recall the craze among celebrities who would flaunt their Prius back when they were new? The distinctive styling broadcasted a willingness to unironically humble themselves in the name of a cause. Other electric vehicle makers have flaunted this same instinct – but not the Nissan Leaf. It’s attractive enough but doesn’t stand out.

For such a small hatchback, the interior comfort is quite good. Nissan makes some of the best front seats this side of Volvo, and the chairs in the Leaf do not disappoint. It’s too bad it’s an EV with a relatively-limited range – my family of four could otherwise be happy in the Leaf for a long, multi-state cruise.

Cargo space isn’t huge, but it’s enough for most needs. You’ll see a bag here for the included 120v charging cable – you’ll likely pull that out and leave it in the garage unless you’re taking an overnight trip to grandma’s house for the holidays where you’ll want to plug in.

Ride quality is quite good – likely helped by the low center of gravity and 3,934 lb curb weight keeping secondary suspension motions in check. The car isn’t completely silent – wind and tire noise are much more noticeable here since the electric drivetrain is so quiet – but the relative lack of noise makes for a serene driving experience. Handling is fine for a commuter car meant to see city streets and the freeway – it’s not at all fun to drive, nor is it meant to be.

The 250 lb-ft of torque will get the Leaf moving off the line with authority, though acceleration is blunted a bit as the car reaches freeway speeds and beyond. The quiet drivetrain means you don’t necessarily notice your ground speed until you look down and see the needle approaching ninety – a recalibration of one’s butt dyno is in order when switching to an EV from a traditional internal-combustion engine.

In all, I could see myself easily living with the Leaf as a second/third car for my family – with some strong caveats, only one of which is caused by the car.

First, this Leaf Plus model is equipped with a 62 kWh battery – giving an advertised range of “up to” 215 miles. The thing is – that 215 miles of range is under ideal conditions with a 100 percent charge. Most charging stations will shut off charging at 80 percent of charge, which nets a listing of 180 miles. The reasons for the 80 percent charging cutoff are numerous and probably too in the weeds for a discussion here, but understand that is not a Leaf problem – it’s a problem that affects every electric vehicle today.

Note that 180 miles of realistic range and remember that I live 200 miles from Detroit. Indeed, the delivery of my Leaf was quite delayed as the driver needed to stop and top up – delivering the car with around 50 miles of range right before I needed to rush out of my office to get to my kid’s sporting event. That evening, I spent an hour of my time reading a book in the parking lot of a supermarket while the Leaf charged. I’d have walked to a restaurant or a bar to kill time, but it was after 10 pm and everything is closed on a late Wednesday night in the suburbs.

I had a flight early the next morning, and the Columbus airport lists a few fast-charging stations on a certain level of the long-term parking garage. I couldn’t find them – though the area where they might have been seemed to be under construction. Thank goodness I’d charged the night before.

The weekend came, which meant the weekly grocery shop. I convinced my bride to change up our routine for this week only – shopping at Meijers’ instead of Krogers’ – as the Meijer had the aforementioned fast-charging station. Seven bucks and 45 minutes later, we had our 180 miles of range once more.

Sure, I could have charged at home – and, indeed, I tried. But my home, built during the Carter administration, has wiring in the garage that isn’t the best. As I’ve run into before, plugging in a high-load device such as a car into a circuit in my garage means that circuit is pretty much tapped out. My microwave is on the same circuit – which plunged half of my house into darkness when my daughter wanted some popcorn one evening.

Charging stations are few around here, and they aren’t conveniently placed. My colleague Kevin Williams documented his struggles with charging here in Columbus in a series over at The Drive/Car Bibles – his issues were exacerbated by renting, so he can’t even put in a 240v outlet for charging.

I could, should I decide to pull the trigger on an EV someday, spend a fair bit of cash in running a fifty amp circuit from my basement panel to the garage – if copper prices ever plunge, I’ll be stocking up on six gauge wire – but those who must street park or otherwise don’t have reliable access to at least two hundred forty volts of alternating current must weigh their mobility with their ability to trust that some random charging station sorta near their destination hopefully will actually work this time.

We aren’t there yet. California has probably done the best in managing charging infrastructure – and, admittedly, Tesla has done pretty well with their proprietary network – but for the rest of us in the hinterlands, we can’t quite rely on charging stations should we need to go beyond our usual commute.

I’m genuinely intrigued by the possibilities presented by this Nissan Leaf, however. For now, it would have to remain a second car for my family, as our frequent long-distance needs are best met by internal combustion. If we collectively can manage a better infrastructure – especially if we can serve that infrastructure with cleaner, renewable energy sources – then we can potentially make a dent in our petroleum dependence.

[Images © 2022 Chris Tonn/TTAC]

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51 Comments on “2022 Nissan LEAF Review – Horse Firmly In Front Of Cart, But Path Not Yet Determined...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “ While I’m nobody’s idea of an environmentalist, I do my best to make an effort here and there to reduce my impact on the world at large. I recycle what I can. I try to choose products that are reusable where possible. I try to leave my thermostat reasonably cool during the winter and encourage my kids to follow President Carter’s advice to put on a damned sweater.”

    Most people are exactly like that. Which is why we have articles like we read here recently about people not being keen on EVs. They are the antithesis to reducing and caring for the environment.

    • 0 avatar
      Eliyahu

      Please! Keep in mind that there are multiple factors which most people have to consider. I’ve been driving 4,000 miles during Covid. So should I ditch my 28 MPG sedan for a Leaf? EVs are not cost-free to the environment either. Plug in hybrids might be the best answer for many people, but access to charging is still a problem. And how much lithium is there on the planet?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “And how much lithium is there on the planet?”

        Turns out there’s a crap ton of it right here in the U.S., in a place no one expected – the Salton Sea.

        https://www.kcet.org/news-community/as-lithium-drilling-advances-at-the-salton-sea-researchers-work-out-the-details

        Might be a way to salvage something good out of that environmental dumpster fire.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          If you do so much as disturb the dirt in the dried out portions of the Salton Sea doesn’t a toxic dust cloud ensue? Seemes.envronmentally it wouldn’t be an easy place to mine anything

          • 0 avatar
            jansob

            Oh, I’m sure the regulations will be loosened for EV battery production. After all, it’s really hard to prove specific damage from pollution.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ So should I ditch my 28 MPG sedan for a Leaf?”

        Oh god no. Your 28mpg sedan is a far better vehicle and it’s far better for the environment for you to use it.

        Lithium is going to be in short supply and it’s incredibly damaging to the planet to retrieve it. EVs are awful. Stick with your ICE vehicle. It’s far cheaper in the long run

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      No, they are not.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    -redacted comment-

    • 0 avatar

      @Master Baiter this is a warning. Using racist terms in your comments is not permitted.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        In other news… DSM! DSM! DSM!

        https://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/cto/d/pittsburgh-1993-eagle-talon-tsi-awd/7488583123.html

        • 0 avatar

          Knock $2500 off the price and that’s a buy.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            In 2022? You’re dreamin’.

          • 0 avatar

            It’s not a “need” for anyone, and certainly not that desirable! Only a sucker would pony up $10k.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’d say even less with those miles but we left Earth some time ago. I’m not sure if collectors hone in on something like this, I feel its a good condition example outside of collector grade.

            I respect the seller though:

            “When the Pandemic hit, the car went into storage at my home garage for the last two and a half years. At 75, progressive arthritis forces me to sell my “throw-back” car.”

            75 rockin’ DSM, this guy was well out of the target demo when it was new but had the itch later in life .

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          On the same note, I can feel the power of Our Lord from here:

          https://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/cto/d/lyndora-1990-buick-park-avenuestwo/7488376659.html

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Gold one seems okay as long as the continental kit isn’t screwed into the trunk and the grille mounting holes aren’t smashed apart. The wheels are different depending on the photo as well. No early 90s ABS to deal with.

            Maybe flip the blue one if the sheet metal isn’t bad.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The spirit is in you if you can feel the godly power even while looking at that upholstery.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Thank you Corey.

  • avatar
    ajla

    1. The Leaf uses CHAdeMO for fast charging, which is the BetaMax of charging and will likely become unfindable during your ownership period.

    2. This is a good depiction of the Leaf’s thermal management:
    youtu.be/PUAjdOFV1Lw

    3. The charging infrastructure issues, as well as the issues with older homes possibly needing electrical upgrades for at-home charging really shouldn’t be handwaved away.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Hey, I have a Betamax VCR and a couple of hundred Beta tapes of crap I recorded in the 80’s, including the first season of The Simpsons- complete with commercials.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m building a garage….and part of the build is that there will be a 240v outlet run to the new structure, not just a 120v line. I don’t own an electric now, but expect to at some point…and in ten-fifteen years when I expect to sell this mess, the new buyer will be looking for that. I have 20’s-50’s and 80’s wiring, but luckily, a home run to the box for a clothes dryer that has since move to another side of the house.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    CHAdeMO is a deal-breaker at this point. Even Nissan’s own newer EVs have moved to J1772.

    Outside of CHAdeMO, though, we test-drove this generation of Leaf when we bought our Bolt, and the Bolt absolutely trounced the Leaf in every respect except for front-seat comfort. It had similar interior space in a significantly smaller exterior footprint. It’s faster, handles better, and is way more fun and engaging to drive. Neither car is exactly a star in interior ambience but the 2022 Bolt’s new interior is decisively better than the Leaf’s. And (recall notwithstanding) the Bolt has modern thermal management that should protect the battery over a much longer lifespan.

    The difference was stark enough that my wife came back from the Leaf test drive and, sitting there in the Nissan showroom, told me to call the Chevy dealer and sign the papers.

    One other thing I forgot to mention: I had similar electrical capacity issues in my 1953 house. We “solved” it by having a 240V 10A outlet wired and using the Bolt’s feature to limit Level 2 charging to 8A. 8A at 240V is still plenty to charge overnight in typical usage. We’re now remodeling and will have a modern 400A service installed as part of the process.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “except for front-seat comfort.”

      Those 1G Bolt seats though. I also think the Leaf rides better but YMMV.

      “8A at 240V”

      Is that around 7 miles charged per hour? I guess that’s fine overnight most of the time but it would be more palatable with an EV6’s 350kWh rate over the Bolt’s Iron Duke 50kWh.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Yep, you get about 2 kWh/hour out of it. Worked fine in our usage but definitely wasn’t ideal. But the Bolt can’t charge that fast even at full Level 2 capacity.

        The Leaf rides more softly, but with much worse body control. Whether it’s a “better” ride would be a matter of opinion. Neither car is a standout on ride.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      400 A? You live in a 6000 square foot home? Most residences typically have 200A services….

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        400 A is overkill but we decided that with two car charging outlets which we want to be capable of 40 A each simultaneously, an outdoor oven, and an unusual volume of computers and electronics, 200 A would be uncomfortably close to the wire (no pun intended).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Damn, Chris, I suggested this very story idea to Tim a few days ago!

    Good, honest assessment about the state of infrastructure.

    And I think this explains why Tesla is selling a crapload of cars and GM and Nissan have limped along with the Leaf and Bolt – the latter are chasing less affluent customers who may or may not have charging at home, but Tesla owners, being more affluent, usually have a garage to charge up in.

    I live in an apartment complex, and would have difficulty charging up. A neighbor of mine owns a Model Y, and I asked him how he charges – turns out he works in Boulder and his employer has chargers on-site. I think we’ll start seeing more of that.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      Tesla also built their own charging infrastructure that only works with Teslas, and in some areas they are the only EVs that are practical to own for that reason. Tesla’s cars are no longer state of the EV art (though they’re close to it), but buying a Tesla means thousands more places to recharge while on the road. This will probably change over the next few years, but right now I think Tesla’s charging stations are what’s keeping the company at the top of the EV sales charts.

  • avatar
    JMII

    3,900lbs? yep, batteries are heavy. Why does it have a tunnel in the back? Are the batteries there instead of the skateboard arrangement? I assumed there would be a flat floor. Does it have a frunk? Looks better then the previous version, just not sure the floating roof design works here… maybe having the windows tinted would help.

  • avatar
    Alex Mackinnon

    Another EV review where the majority of the content is about not being setup to recharge the car and crappy hinterland charging infrastructure? Cool. Colour me surprised.

    It’s a 5 year old car design, but it would be nice to know about things like handling. Can it compare to a simliarly powerful hatchback, etc. Does it lean? Does it oversteer like a pig? Does it feel locked down due to the low CoG?

    Nothing about Chademo being a dead end, nothing about the battery cooling system being non-existant, come on guys.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      It’s a heavy Versa and rides and handles pretty much like you’d expect a heavy Versa to. Softly sprung, indifferent body control, probably would understeer decisively if you felt the need to push it hard enough to find out, but it’s crystal-clear about not having any interest in that sort of thing. The low COG mostly means it doesn’t feel quite as heavy as it is, but it’s no one’s idea of a handler.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Can the CHAdeMO plug be replaced by the newer design without too much difficulty? Enquiring minds want to know.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        There is not any economical way to do a conversion and there’s presently no adapter to go from CHAdeMo to CCS.

        http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?t=32592

  • avatar
    Dale Houston

    This is the first generation of Leaf that has enough range to be useful. The range still ought to be higher. And for an EV to be frictionless you need a level 2 charger at home. Not having to stop at gas stations is a game changer.

    I had a gig at Natalie’s in Worthington, just north of Columbus, in December. Drove my EV down, visited a supercharger near my hotel and drove back to Cleveland the next day. I don’t know what off-brand charging is like but it worked well for me.

  • avatar
    Beoldziewski

    I rented a few EV models before buying a Leaf. But I had planned to test the outlet charging, the fast charging, the long trip. None of it was convenient until I learned my new routine. Similar to how to how towing my first travel trailer was challenging until I learned routines for that. If you’re going to review an EV at least try, stop this crap of complaining it’s different vs a gas car. That’s a given. The Leaf is the least refined EV on the market today BUT it feels so much like my first car, a Toyota Celica, because it’s not loaded with fancy crap and weight I can toss it around and play with wheel spin all I want. I love it, and my 700mi trip at Christmas wasn’t bad at all.

  • avatar
    sumgai1986

    If you take this car for what it is, and try not to make it too much more, it is an absolutely wonderful vehicle. The leaf is a commuter, for going back and forth to work, taking kids to school or soccer practice, running to the grocery store, visiting nearby family. Etc. Don’t try and make it a road trip machine because you will be disappointed.

    We are fortunate enough to also have an older minivan in the garage which we use exclusively for road trips. However, the leaf is more than sufficient for 95% of our annual driving and saves a boatload of money too. It’s not for everyone, but for the right customer it’s a great car.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @sumgai1986–That is exactly what a Leaf should be taken for as a commuter vehicle and for short trips. Makes sense to start out with an EV for those purposes and charge it overnight in your garage. A used Leaf can be a decent buy as well. For most people who want a more affordable EV the Leaf or Bolt would do most of what they would need. A Tesla, Mach E, and Lightning are not very affordable for many and thus make less sense. I bought a battery power lawnmower that works perfectly for the small amount of yard I have to mower which is perfect for that but if I had a half acre or more it would not. Battery can be taken in and out easily and I have a backup battery charged and ready if I run out of charge. I usually can get about 3 complete mowings from 1 battery. Twenty years ago I had another battery operated mower which I used for 1 season that could not hold a charge and when charged it lacked the power of this new generation of mowers. Like everything technology gets better and this will be true for EVs. A few years ago I would have never even thought of owning an EV but as the technology improves and the infrastructure expands in the future I will consider one. I am sure that there are others like me. I have a few neighbors that have gotten EVs as a 2nd or 3rd vehicle and they seem to be very satisfied.

  • avatar
    Tachyon

    Living in SoCal, the dirty little secret is that “outside the Tesla ecosystem” Public Charging is terribly unreliable.

    Half the public chargers are seemingly broken.
    Half of what’s left apparently have a Tesla TM3 or BMW i3 permanently parked in the spot.
    Half of what’s left after you exhaust those options is either behind a locked gate or in a Pay Lot you don’t have access to.

    I’ve had my LEAF for over 9 months– and to date have never successfully completed a public charging session. The last time I just had to tow it how to the charger in my garage.

    It’s all bad, and likely to get worse as sales numbers grow and the public chargers lag.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Wonderful post. Perfectly illustrates my point that we are not ready for the EVs that the government is forcing upon us through legislation.

      This is a prime example of why PHEVs and to a lesser extent, hybrids, are the only logical path forward right now.

      Our infrastructure just can’t handle the very EVs that are sold today. It’s comically bad

      • 0 avatar
        probert

        I drive my EV and have few issues. I am fortunate to be able to charge at home, and have stations along my usual routes, but there are limitations. The infrastructure needs improvement as the US lags most developed nations where adoption is at a much higher rate . On that front the usual players are dropping the ball, but Tesla is considering opening their network for all CCS EVs, as they have done in Europe, and if they do, it will be a game changer.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      EBFlex’s friend of the day, your experiences are exactly what he wants to believe EV ownership is like. And pound on.

      I don’t live in SoCal, I live in the Richmond, VA area, which is supposedly the Bronze Age for EV ownership (Western Pennsylvania that’s not Pittsburgh is the Stone Age). We’re not exactly overrun with DCFC (aka, Level 3) stations, but the ones we do work very well. I don’t use them often because, like most EV owners, I charge at home 95%+ of the time, but they do the job.

      What never gets mentioned in these conversations is all the free charging stations around, which is why I rarely use the Level 3 setups if I’m not at home. Yeah, they’re plain old Level 2, 25-35 miles per hour charging, but it’s a nice reserved parking place, and I get to put back what I’ve used that day while out having dinner, shopping, whatever.

      When was the last time anyone here saw a gas (or diesel) pump with “Free” on it?

      This crowd’s ability to dream up situations where an EV cannot possibly work definitely borders on overdrive. If I’d have run into one tenth of the examples people here insist on coming with with, I’d have dumped by Bolt long ago. However, mine fits fine into my life. No problems, and my only concern is how long until the dealer calls my name for the battery recall. No, I’m not particularly worried about a battery fire.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        In a bit over three years of Bolt ownership and daily driving, I’ve used a public charger a grand total of twice. Both times it was an ordinary Level 2 charger used to charge the car overnight on a short road trip.

        If you only use your EV around town, or if you’re in the fairly large group of city people who will fly anywhere that’s more than a couple hours away, then home charging is what matters. Apartments and condos with parking will need to have EVSEs or at least 120 V outlets (which can work for low to moderate driving needs) and landlords should be thinking about that now.

        I’m currently living in a rental that has a 120 V outlet in the garage. It works fine for up to around 30/miles day of driving on average. Some days we drive 40 miles and others we drive 15, so there hasn’t been any problem.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          This was the biggest surprise for me when I got an EV: that the whole fast-charging aspect basically hasn’t come into play _at all_. Not only have I never charged at a public L3 charger, I haven’t even bothered setting up the L2 charger at home – it’s still sitting in its box in the basement, to be mounted when we finish the home renovation we’re working on. And it literally hasn’t mattered, even once.

          When I’m driving anywhere within an hour or two of the metro area (which is 95% of my driving), I take the EV6. When I go on longer trips, I take the Alfa. So my actual fuel usage has gone down by 90% or so. Most of the times that I actually drive my ICE car, it’s purely to take it for a spin every few weeks so that it doesn’t sit for too long between drives.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “When I go on longer trips, I take the Alfa.”

            That’s a pretty important sentence.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yes, today anyone who regularly drives long distances needs either an ICE car or a Tesla.

            That’s going to change in fairly short order. There are new L2 and L3 stations going in every day, and each year with six or (soon) seven figures of EV sales will make more of them profitable to install. L2 stations are incredibly cheap and even low usage will make them worth installing. L3 stations are a bit more expensive but still much cheaper than gas fueling infrastructure. Once there’s good access to L3 charging along the major routes, trips in EVs will become much easier, although still slower than the hypothetical bladder-busting/Cannonball Run times ICEs can achieve.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            “That’s a pretty important sentence.”

            It absolutely is. But it’s also reflective of reality for the lion’s share of American households. The average American household has 1.9 cars. If we were a one-car household, I don’t know if I’d own a BEV, but like most folks (and certainly everyone I know around us in the ‘burbs), we have two.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            From what this says, 33.5% of US households have 1 vehicle, 33.1% own 2, 24.4% own more than 2, and 9% don’t have any vehicle.

            policyadvice.net/insurance/insights/how-many-americans-own-cars/

            So a majority does have multiple vehicles but single vehicle households aren’t de minimis either. As dal brought up though, more public L3 stations will make this less of an issue.

  • avatar
    probert

    Well, just to note, the leaf is one of the lowest range EVs available. Most EVs are a lot of fun to drive – sounds like this one isn’t, but it is an anomaly. In general the Leaf is the odd man out in terms of modern EVs. Nissan now has the Arayia which is on par with modern tech.

    If you have a commute longer than the range of your EV, with few charging stations, yes, it may not be the right choice. In general, they do require more thought and planning at this point, but for usual day to day they have plenty of range. Having access to 110 or 220 makes a big difference.

  • avatar
    ??

    great review!

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