By on January 24, 2022

Ford’s sales success with the Maverick pickup has been undeniable. But if you’re in need of more evidence, the automaker has begun notifying dealerships to stop taking reservations on the base hybrid model because it doesn’t even think it can keep up with the existing backlog. 

Both Automotive News and The Wall Street Journal reported on memos issued to dealers on Monday. The manufacturer has since confirmed the decision, saying it planned to reopen the order books on 2023 model year Maverick Hybrids this summer. This is being done to ensure it can produce enough pickups to address the backlog and hopefully convince more prospective buyers to ditch the $19,995 (before taxes, destination fees, or options) base pickup for the non-hybrid version that uses the 2.0-liter EcoBoost and costs a few grand more.

The turbocharged Maverick (250 hp) is noticeably more gutsy under acceleration, opens the door to several desirable options the hybrid (191 hp) is missing, and even doubles its maximum towing capacity to 4,000 pounds with the relevant equipment package. But it’s not quite the bargain the base model is and lacks the genuinely impressive efficiency ratings issued by the EPA. Turbocharged Mavericks are rated at 23 mpg city and 30 mpg on the highway, with all-wheel drive variants losing an additional 1 mile per gallon. Hybrids offer 42 mpg city and 33 mpg highway, making them ideal for drivers with a tight fuel budget.

“We didn’t want to take more orders than we could build,” explained Dean Stoneley, general manager of Ford trucks. “We’re getting customers who would have perhaps bought a used car and are now buying the Maverick because it is so affordable.”

With used vehicle prices exceptionally high right now, dealers have been able to ask more for new vehicles as well. But the Maverick Hybrid represented a relatively good value, especially after domestic automakers culled economy cars a few years ago to maximize profitability. Considering the current state of the economy and the sizable uptick in fuel prices that took place in 2021, one could assume the Ford Maverick is gobbling up sales that would have otherwise gone to the small sedans and hatchbacks that had previously been removed from the North American market.

From WSJ:

Ford rolled out the Maverick last year as a more-manageable alternative to the big pickups that now dominate the U.S. market. The truck has drawn many first-time truck buyers who migrated from sedans or small SUVs, dealers said.

Ford in 2018 decided to eliminate from its lineup the cars that had long served as entry points for new car buyers, including the Fiesta and Focus, which were money losers, executives have said.

Ford’s move to ditch entry-level cars frustrated many dealers, who said it left them few options to offer shoppers for less than $30,000.
Other car companies have also followed suit in recent years, jettisoning budget small cars and hatchbacks from their showrooms and adding more higher-priced trucks and SUVs to fatten profit margins.

There are five nameplates in the U.S. today with an average sticker price of $20,000 or less, down from 19 a decade ago, research firm Cox Automotive said.

Chris Lemley, president of Sentry Auto Group, a Boston-area Ford-Lincoln-Mazda dealership, told WSJ that the decision to pause customer orders on a vehicle like the Maverick was unusual. But that it was also “appropriate under the circumstances” to avoid disappointing customers. He also said that the brunt of the pickups were currently trading in the mid-to-high $20,000 range.

“We desperately needed something in that price range,” Lemley concluded.

The good news is that the Maverick situation didn’t come out of the blue. Ford was aware that it was running out of Hybrids in December and would probably need to stop taking reservations on the 2023 model year if it couldn’t get more people to buy the more-expensive EcoBoost. The automaker said it will stop taking new orders on the Hybrid after January 27th to focus on existing bookings. It also hinted that it might attempt to expand capacity, though your author would wager Ford would prefer it if more people just bought the turbocharged version.

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

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47 Comments on “Ford Pausing Reservations on Maverick Hybrid Until Summer...”


  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    Actually this post is wrong. This is a shut down of all orders for the 2022 Maverick including the 2.0 Eco-boost version. Hybrid orders have been closed down for several weeks.

    Ford will take orders through this Thursday for 2.0 Eco-boost versions and then dealers will have until next Wednesday to supply the proper paperwork to lock in their orders. Any extra production beyond customer orders will be supplied to dealers as stock units.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      correct. which is why i thought, why are you running this AGAIN?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Factual errors? Say it ain’t so. Yes, it appears this applies to every Maverick model, not just the hybrid:

      https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/ford/2022/01/24/2022-ford-maverick-pickup-order/6634931001/

      Might be nice if the writer contacted Ford and updated the story appropriately.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Build a better mouse trap…..

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      And also keep the price mouse sized….

      Honda has been struggling to move a not-that-much-larger truck for years, despite it being amazing for what it is. But the Honda has been priced high, even if not necessarily for what you are getting. Ford seems to have recognized that many looking for a small TRUCK, perhaps as opposed to a CUV or sedan, are perfectly happy to accept a bit more chintz in the execution, in exchange for a dramatically lower price and fuel consumption.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Best normie vehicle on sale today.

  • avatar
    JMII

    What? A “truck” with a bed smaller then 6 foot is popular? The internet told me I should only buy full size trucks because anything smaller would be completely un-usable and thus worthless.

    Based on this I wonder how soon before Subaru, Toyota, GM, Nissan, etc get some compact trucklet into the market. The demand is real.

    I posted before I know several people who bailed on the Mav and bought a Santa Cruz because they grew tired of Ford’s endless delays and poor communication. Now based on my buying experience so far they are not going to have much luck by switching to team Hyundai either. I can’t find a SC to purchase thanks to over MSRP dealers, no inventory or sales people who never return my emails.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Small truck is a part of it but good fuel economy and a price in line with a Corolla are the other pieces.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Imagine: a truck that can carry your planters and soil home from Home Depot without the carpet getting all screwsd up, but that also fits in the parking space at Home Depot!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Ford is proving itself to be INCREDIBLY bad at new model rollouts – either they can’t build them right (the Explorer) or they can’t build enough of them.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        In this situation I’m betting that Ford did not expect the Maverick to be a runaway success.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Agree Lou and Ford did not anticipate the Maverick being so popular with those 50 and older that wanted to downsize to a smaller more affordable truck. Ford is marketing these trucks to Millennials and younger which are buying the Maverick as well but they did not factor in the demand from those of us who are seniors. I have a production date of the week of Feb 14 and after it is produced Ford is suppose to send me an approximate date as to when my dealer will receive it.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            Same with the Santa Cruz – its marketed to skaters and surfers but the majority on the forums (myself included) are over 50 years old. We remember back when compact trucks were a thing. I’ve owned a Ranger and a Dakota and until the SC launched nothing interested me regardless of price because everything was too big, including the new Ranger.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @JMII – I’ve seen a Santa Cruz on the road and the occupants were definitely elderly. I’ve seen one Maverick but did not get close enough to see the occupants.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @JMII–The Santa Cruz was also on my list and I am well over 50. Seems the car companies don’t want to associate themselves with those of us that are 50 and over maybe because the product will be associated with old people. Shouldn’t really matter if it is a good product it should appeal to all ages

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        If only they could design a new model no one will buy then supply problems will be eliminated.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      If Suzuki has a small pickup, now would be the time to return to the American market. Heck, bring a couple of good, reasonably priced economy cars (and a mini SUV, ahem…), since there are a few niches just waiting to be filled.

  • avatar
    lastwgn

    Ford stopped hybrid orders back in December. Today’s announcement to dealerships is that they are stopping orders on the 2022 Ecoboost Maverick as well beginning on January 27.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Attempted to order Hybrid Maverick last week of Nov. 2021. First week of December I was contacted by sales manager and notified Ford would not accept the order due to hybrid being sold out for 2022, I would have to change order to 2.0 or wait until Summer 2022 to order a 2023.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The Maverick’s biggest competitor is the F-150 across the showroom (or the configuration page). Or vice-versa.

    Perhaps Ford detected a rush for the cheap doors, and is putting an end to it. I’ll bet a dollar the 2023 Maverick order page returns with substantially higher prices – whether hybrid or EB.

    The Lightning will also erode the standing of the ICE F-150, but it commands high prices and remains under the F-Series umbrella – so no worries there.

    Don’t want to jeopardize the F-series sales crown!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Do you really think F150 buyers cross shop the Maverick? I doubt it, personally.

      But I wouldn’t be surprised if the 2023 model prices were higher. Ford clearly has a hit on its’ hands.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @SCE to AUX – I’d have to disagree. I can’t see many buyers cross-shopping a Maverick and F150. Ranger yes, F150 unlikely. If anything, this will eat into Ford’s small to mid-sized CUV/SUV sales.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      I’m seriously contemplating a Maverick, but would not buy an F-150 at any cost. People cross-shopping Mavericks are probably potential buyers for small CUVs, compact sedans, and used cars. It’s an apples/oranges comparison.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Price increase already implemented on 2022 models.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      This. I totally believe that Ford put the brakes on this truck because of F150. Not so much for the sales crown, but because Ford doesn’t exist without F150 sales. Any amount of cannibalization is bad. So make the Maverick available, just not in huge numbers. Lease expiring…guess what, we are still making the f150 and will be getting a shipment next week. If you want a Maverick, you can’t get a base model period and have to wait 8 months for one in any variety.

    • 0 avatar
      agent534

      Its Bronco sport the Maverick is edging out. Same truck as the Bronco Sport, but with a longer wheelbase, a bed, and a cheaper price.
      Ford put a lot of brand building into Bronco, but it looks like Maverick is beating the Sport. I would guess they could easily shift Sport production to Maverick, or have and still can’t meet demand?

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    You have 100 chips on the shelf. Are you gonna use them to build $20k Mavericks or $80k F-250 Platinum? You decide.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Ford is lying. This amazingly cheap vehicle is not that compelling of a vehicle, offers poor capability numbers, is missing even the most basic of features that should be on a modern car, is designed so poorly that Ford can’t make the AWD hybrid powertrain from its platform twin work, etc.

    And this after Ford told us nobody wants small trucks. My guess is there is a bigger issue going on and Ford is using the excuse “too many orders” to cover it up. Similar to how the Ranger SUV was delayed because of covid (despite the Ranger SUV not being able to get the covid cold) and not major quality issues (like the roof not working).

  • avatar
    AK

    Bring on the ST version please.

  • avatar

    I don’t think this is really competing against the F-150. More likley the Ranger and CUVs. Given the volume I would expect some price increases but too much and you alienate customers. Also the hybrid helps offset CAFE sales of the F-150, so if you have the plant capacity and parts build and ship.
    Given shortage of parts it does make sense to prioritize profit per vehicle. Also the Maverick seems to be bringing in a lot of new Ford buyers so while you want to protect the cash cows you still need those new buyers.
    Given that I expect a 10% or so price increase and as long as they have parts they will try to max the capacity of plant in Mexico.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agree… nobody is cross shopping this with an F150. The F150’s massive size has created a gap in the market the Mav fills. The Ranger is the red-headed step child now – too small for some yet too big for others (like me). The Mav might be stealing some Ranger, Bronco Sport or Escape customers but that is about it.

      • 0 avatar

        Even if it did take F-150 customers those customers aren’t buying the 21K version their getting it pretty loaded and still saving money. If you were ready to drop 45K on a low spec F150, why not drop 35K on a high spec Mav. At that price I’m assuming Ford is making a good percentage unlike the 21K version.

  • avatar
    haze3

    Mav is a hit, period.

    There are only 1st world problems for Ford: available engine types, plant mfg capacities, chips, pressure on Ranger/Bronco, how much to increase price.

    For customers, there is some near term aggravation (availability, dealer markup) but the Mav is still great for the long term (capacity crunch will end, competition will flow).

    Good stuff

  • avatar
    zipper69

    quote:
    “…convince more prospective buyers to ditch the $19,995 (before taxes, destination fees, or options) base pickup for the non-hybrid version that uses the 2.0-liter EcoBoost and costs a few grand more”

    Naturally, it wouldn’t occur to the Ford bean counters to cut the base price of the non-hybrid version to make it more attractive…

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Just got an email from Ford today bumping my Maverick production from the week of Feb 14 to the week of March 14. Ford is definitely not prepared for the launch of new vehicles and if Ford’s future lies in customer orders it will be a big fail. Not many people will wait a year for their new vehicle to be produced. For now I am going to wait but if this goes beyond a year then I might look elsewhere and then I doubt I would ever buy another Ford.

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