By on October 26, 2021

Chevrolet

The 2023 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 is here.

And on paper, it appears to be bad-ass in ways worthy of the Z06 designation.

The track-focused Z06 starts with wider front and rear fascias and a front splitter. The car shares its chassis with Corvette Racing’s C8.R, and the Z06 has a 3.6-inch wider stance than the Corvette Stingray. This allows for the use of 345mm rear tires. Additional side vents increase airflow.

The front fascia channels intake air to a central heat exchanger, which is one of five such units. Standard is a reconfigurable rear spoiler with an adjustable wickerbill.

Chevrolet

Standard wheels are 20 inches in front and 21 in the rear, with carbon-fiber wheels available. The brakes are bigger than Stingray’s and get six-piston front calipers, and the suspension is specifically tuned. That includes the magnetic ride control.

Chevrolet

Power gets to ground via an eight-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission and the final-drive ratio is 5.56. A Z07 Performance Package is optional and includes a carbon-fiber rear wing, ground effects, specific chassis tuning, specific magnetic ride control tuning, Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes, available carbon-fiber wheels, and Michelin Cup 2 R ZP tires. Chevy claims this package can give the car up to 734 pounds of downforce at 186 mph.

Chevrolet

By now you’re likely screaming at me to tell you about the engine, so I shall oblige. The LT6 5.5-liter dual-overhead-cam V8 is naturally aspirated, has a flat-plane crank and an 8,600-rpm redline, a dry-sump oil system, short strokes, aluminum cylinder block, aluminum pistons, forged titanium connecting rods, active split intake manifold with twin 87mm throttle bodies, four-to-two-to-one stainless steel exhaust headers, and a power output of 670 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque.

Chevrolet

An available carbon-fiber aero package adds a larger front splitter and underbody aero strakes, as well as a pedestal-based rear wing and front-corner dive planes.

Chevrolet

Modern track-focused cars include electronic aids, and the Z06 is no exception, featuring launch control, an electronically limited-slip differential, and performance traction management.

Chevrolet

Production is set to begin next summer in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and this ‘Vette is going global, as both left-hand and right-hand drive versions will be built.

Chevrolet didn’t list a price in the press release, but we’d wager that it will be close to, if not over, six figures to start.

[Images: Chevrolet]

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65 Comments on “2023 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Brings the Track to the Street...”


  • avatar
    JMII

    Just noticed they moved the exhaust back to the center… I like that better then tips on the edges the standard Stingray has. Amazed they can develop a one-off engine just for this car. So much for the AWD and hybrid rumors unless there will be yet another version to come on this platform.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      I was up in DTW about 3-4 months before the C8 was rolled out.

      Northbound on Mound by the tech center. I saw a baby blue C8 and was “WOW” – awesome i think! Well to tell you the truth, the C8 has NOT grown on me. I dont think i like it. All the sharp angles and such. It looks like an origami car. So…
      1- i like the C7 better
      2- 5.5 l DOHC. What could go wrong?? !! I think i ll stick with the 6.2.
      3- I really think i d go with a 911 instead. Or a GTI R.

      Above is the truth. I have no DSMs.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Agree on all points… well except the last one ;)

        I love my C7 but if I moved onto a C8 (my wife loves the look) it wouldn’t be a Z06. Instead I’d stick with have now: a 3LT Z51 but as a HTC instead of a coupe. The nice thing about the Corvette market is most cars are garage queens so low mileage, near perfect examples are plentiful.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I had the luck of driving a friend’s new C8 – 1200 miles on it. First time driving a dual clutch. Shifts snap off incredibly quick. Also the first time driving a mid engine car. Turn in is incredible and the thing blasts off effortlessly. However, I still think the C7 is a more attractive car.

          My C7 has been reliable; how well the C8 does is anybody’s guess. I did note that one thing I hoped to see disappear with the new generation – too much assembly variability – is still present. My car is really good but I have seen plenty of examples where body panels needed some adjustment. Maybe GM would just be better off making the body out of steel so the car could be built like a normal car…

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            If your car has a well done DCT, you won’t miss a manual very much. You DEFINITELY won’t miss it in traffic.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Magnificent car.

    Long Live Chevrolet Corvette. The King.

  • avatar
    dwford

    This is how sports car engines are supposed to be: high revving and naturally aspirated, not 6000rpm turbo lumps that sound like truck engines. (don’t bother correcting me, nitpickers. It’s the comments section, not a doctoral dissertation)

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      LOL

    • 0 avatar
      PUNKem733

      Funny this is what Jim Mero had to say about that. Those lumps made the best sounds.

      https://www.roadandtrack.com/news/a38103881/2023-corvette-z06-corvette-racing-canon/

      “Suspension engineer Jim Mero counts himself among those that miss the brutality of the Corvettes, something that stood out more on the track against a wide variety of advanced, high-revving racing engines:

      “In the American Le Mans Series, all the flat-plane crank, high-revving motors came out. Then it sounds like the world is coming to an end, trees are falling down, and it’s the two Corvettes. The pushrod engines, I just loved the mystique about it. Even though [the new car] is awesome, it’s awesome like all of the other cars. The throaty sound that comes out of the pushrod engines, to me, was part of the Corvette personality.”

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Hard to put into words how awesome this seems to be. Hopefully there will be a time before the end of the run where they are available to order at MSRP.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    It looks like my decision to drop out of modern society was the correct one.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Given the run up in prices on rare cars this last year maybe I should sell a kidney and buy a Z06 as a hedge against Bidenflation.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    8600 rpm small-block. What could go wrong?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “The LT6 5.5-liter dual-overhead-cam V8 is naturally aspirated, has a flat-plane crank and an 8,600-rpm redline”

    What in the actual ****? DOHC? nearly 9 grand at redline?

    RANT START

    GM doesn’t do OHC well, never has and never will. In fact one of the few things they have consistently done well is OHV motors. So we’re going to replicate the LT5 -the ***ZR1’s LT5***- which worked well on paper but was limited to just under 7,000 total units 80-90% of which would ever go beyond third gear or just sit in collections/museums. Why praytell is this an issue, dear reader? Because of the LT5 which it ***didn’t*** design GM thought it could do DOHC and the fruit of which was the dreaded Death, err North, Star.

    LT5 TO NORTHSTAR: No, I am your father.

    I say turn the C8 into a golf cart before stuffing OHC mills into it.

    END RANT

    “The LT5 however wasn’t an evolutionary dead end. Despite being discontinued, a new class of premium V8s for Cadillac and eventually Oldsmobile, the dual overhead cam V8 Northstar and its derivatives, drew heavily from the LT5’s design and lessons learned from its production.[30] GM also took lessons learned from producing a completely aluminum engine and applied them to the new LS series of engines.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_small-block_engine#LT5

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The current DI 3.6L V6 is an excellent DOHC engine. But I’m skeptical that they’ll get this one right, with new tech and low production numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I haven’t driven one recently but I’m not so sure how excellent the last one was. Since the engine family was developed by Holden and *Cadillac* that may explain why other than G/K-bodies and Tahoe based models I don’t see *any* Cadillac 2000-2013ish period on the roads at all now. The only one I can even think of that I know still exists is a friend’s MY12 CTS Coupe.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_High_Feature_engine

        Oh then there were the LY7s which were plagued by timing chain issues for years… otherwise excellent though :D

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I really don’t want to sound like an insufferable fanboy but GM doesn’t have anything that would sway me versus a Toyota/Lexus unless one really, truly tracks their car.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I feel the same way Ajla, GM products aren’t even in my consideration save a few and I’m realistically not buying any of them.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            I’d take this, a V8 Camaro convertible, the CTS4/5 in V or Blackwing configuration, or (believe it or not) a Bolt. The rest can burn (but don’t tell the Bolt or it might be tempted to burn itself).

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            The only thing in GM’s stable that I’m interested in buying is the diesel ZR2 Colorado. The V6 Colorado is plagued by a sh!tty auto transmission.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Lou_BC

            Does the diesel Colorado come in a standard, or a different auto than the gas?

            @Freed

            If we’re talking free I’d take a C8 and if the quad cam sorcery blows up, at least I had fun. Otherwise, not even sure. If the K2XX or whatever the GMT800s are called now we’re styled by mental patients it would be a maybe but even free I don’t want to look at them.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I wasn’t talking about the LY7, but the LFX and LGX. There are a million Traverses and Impalas on the road with these engines and, in addition to being pretty reliable, they have nice power delivery.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Did they work out the coking issue yet? I think all DI was impacted but I seem to recall the late 00s GM 3.6s being the biggest culprit.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Looks like the LFX is pretty susceptible, but not too many bad things happen as a result. The LGX is a lot less susceptible.

    • 0 avatar
      W126

      Don’t they have some experience with the DOHC 5.5 L V8 layout from their C8R racecar?

  • avatar
    MitchConner

    Don’t care for the design of the C8 to date — but those pics look encouraging. Looking forward to seeing one.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @MitchConner: I think it’s one of those cars that looks much better in person. I think photographers get down too low when photographing it. When you see it on the road in a car or from a standing position, it looks much better.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Pathetic automatic scum

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Guess we can skip the 2022 C8. Are the orders completely filled for the 2022 C8 and filling up for the 2023? By January you can order a 2024?

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The power peak is at 8400 rpm with the redline only 200 rpm higher. Finally, a Corvette that isn’t equipped with a knitting needle pushrod two valve dinosaur engine. 120 bhp/litre and bmep of 204 psi, meaning 84 lb-ft of torque per litre. Your average engine is lucky to muster 75. So it’s pretty damn good for a naturally aspirated engine, 25% better per cube than that 10 litre crate engine for drag racing featured the other day, and not built just for quarter-mile charges. Get a Z06 while they last. The next one will have a Dyson V96 vacuum cleaner motor made in Malaysia from plastic and soybean parts.

    Since this new engine doesn’t seem to have the accountant’s greasy pawprints all over it, I can’t see why it would be a DOHC dud just because it’s a GM. The illogic of blanket statements like that is plain for anyone to see.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Oh how good industrial-grade leather belting feels against my skin, sighed Mary Barra. My seamstress did just fine making my skirt and jacket from NOS belting that was found at shuttered Pontiac plant. The non-shiny leather is as black as my soul she said to herself. She pressed a button and intern appeared. Take that box away young man, it’s full of dead kittens and puppies but don’t tell a soul. Oh, you’ll be fine young man, RENCEN approved will be stamped on all your company paperwork. Oldtimers had typewritten sheets that stated Ed Sloan approved. No one knew exactly what they did but they always got promoted. Some say they retired to a special GM Voodoo retirement community in the swamps of Louisiana. There’s a lot of the Corvair PR people there. She smiled at the intern and said don’t worry Sonny Boy; I pushed through the new grill on the Silverado. With a wicked smile, she said on to the Corvette. For decades Chevy produced one of the best performance values on earth. Some even take the original Stingray and have new running gear put under it. Sonny, that had to end. We made the Corvette mid-engined and price-competitive with a Porshe 911. We’ll win over new customers, those without hip replacements. We’ll add the needed complexity and combine it with GM build quality and strange GM electrical problems. This may be as costly and troubling as a two-year-old Ferrari. Oh, some will remain true, no matter what; we’ll put in special pockets for Bibles and handguns for them. Oh, many don’t speak of the fact you had to find a Chevy dealer who had mechanics who were designated “Corvette techs” to really keep them running. With a winsome smile, she said, this is for the world to see, GM can make a car to run with Porshe and Ferrari. Just be quiet about maintenance and reliability and you’ll be a zone-something in no time at all. We do need to work on the gold chain holder and the Grecian Formula pocket. With increasingly shallow breaths and a slight curling of her toes she said, we’ll even get conquest sales.

  • avatar

    Ugly at Any Speed.

    I wouldn’t take one at half the price, yuck!

  • avatar
    BSttac

    So impressed with the engine. Still think the front end and rear are eyesores, but that engine is truly something special.. This will be over $200k with stealership markup sadly.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @el scotto–Agree. Add we will sell what is left of this hollowed out company to the Chinese and go away into the sunset with our golden parachutes.

  • avatar
    AnalogMan

    It’s still only available with an automatic transmission, which is disgraceful for a Corvette.

    Even though I think it’s painfully ugly, I’d buy one, but not with those silly GameBoy paddle shifters. It’s supposed to be a fun to drive sports car, not a video game. 3 pedals or nothing. I’ll stick with my Mustang GT.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    GRRRRRRRR…want one.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    I still think that Corvette is supposed to be a sports car/muscle car hybrid, and that mid engine doesn’t allow that. Very few people ever drive a Corvette hard through corners. I know that The magazines insist on comparing it to the 911 and Cayman, but it never really needed to compete with those cars. It could have remained the ornery, tire-smoking -and still fun in the twisties- American classic it was.

    Now it’s a legit competitor with the best the world has to offer. How many extra sales will it get around the globe? Not enough to justify the expense and change.

    And an auto transmission?! Is recoding TikToks during your commute really that important?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “I still think that Corvette is supposed to be a sports car/muscle car hybrid, and that mid engine doesn’t allow that. ”

      I don’t know anyone that has thought that. I don’t even understand what your definition of a muscle car is? Does it have to have bad handling to qualify?

      “And an auto transmission?! Is recoding TikToks during your commute really that important?”

      Nothing to do with tiktoks or commuting. Modern performance cars are so quick that humans can’t shift fast enough. Most people I’ve seen are really terrible at it anyway. I think a vintage British sports car or Miata where you have lower power and human skills can improve the performance are great. But, a manual seriously handicaps some modern cars. It’s just absurd in a car that can accelerate 0-60 in 2 to 3 seconds.

      “Now it’s a legit competitor with the best the world has to offer.” Not yet. It really needs all-wheel drive to claim that status. But, the good news is that it’s coming and will be a legitimate modern supercar at that point at the Ferrari/Lamborghini/Porsche tier. As far as the best, it still might have a ways to go to run with Evija’s, Valkyries, Koeniggseggs, and Bugatti-Rimacs. Then again, you never know. I do like it. I’d buy it over a two-wheel drive Ferrari or Lamborghini. Although, if I was going to go with a 2 wheel drive midengine, I might look at an Emira. Lighter weight and far better looks. You can also get a manual if you want. It’s slower, but probably more fun on twisty roads.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “sports car/muscle car hybrid”

        I think he means something like “grand touring” car but one on the sporty side of the class. The Corvette has been around for 68 years and over that time it has gone through many permutations. Do you want your Corvette to lean towards the Portofino or the f8 Tributo?

        Personally, although I do respect what GM has accomplished with the C8, it just isn’t my thing. And, I doubt an AWD E-Ray Hypercar version will end up more appealing. If I was spending Stingray money I’d get a higher-end Mustang or RCF, if I was spending Z06 money I’d get an AMG or LC500 and if I had ridiculous money to spend I’d get a Wraith. Obviously YMMV.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Like if the C8 Z06 was a $90K version of this, would it be so bad?

          youtube.com/watch?v=MWfJIJ213pQ&t

        • 0 avatar
          W126

          There aren’t any rear drive AMGs that can do 0-60 in 2.6 (closest would be AMG GT Black series) and handle like a Z06. Plus Mercedes suspended sales of all V8s except S class and Maybach for 2022. LC500 is a very classy, nice car, but not in the same category as a Z06.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t need to go 0-60 in 2.6 seconds or have IMSA-level handling for the trip to Dairy Queen. A Portofino doesn’t have the performance level of a mid-engine Ferrari
            either but I know which one I’d personally buy.

            What I want from my sports car:
            0. Is fun to drive
            1. Looks amazing (granted this is a matter of preference)
            2. Sounds amazing
            3. Isn’t slower or dynamically inferior to a Mustang GT PP.

        • 0 avatar
          W126

          I think you would enjoy a Ferrari Roma.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Not interested in this so I will not praise it or criticize it. Appears to be more than capable for those who are desiring a car along the lines of a Lambo or Ferrari but at a more affordable price.

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