By on October 8, 2021

When Toyota announced that the Land Cruiser wouldn’t be coming back to the United States, off-road people shrugged and got back into their clapped-out 4Runners. Despite being incredibly capable wherever pavement is in short supply and having a pedigree that rivals Jeep’s Wrangler, the Land Cruiser is a prohibitively expensive vehicle. Toyota’s penchant for overbuilding vehicles merged with the model’s luxurious bent, resulting in a product that retailed at $87,030 before adding a single option, and sales volumes reflected this.

It was just too rich for most Americans and sales suffered as a result. But Lexus has confirmed the Cruiser-based LX will be returning and recently teased the new model’s next-generation online. While the manufacturer hasn’t confirmed that the 2022 Lexus LX 600 will be a rebadged version of Toyota’s off-road emperor, literally every generation of the LX series has been. 

The LX 450 was basically J80, the LX 470 was the J100, and the LX 570 was the J200. So there’s no reason to assume that the fourth-gen Lexus will be anything other than a dressed-up Land Cruiser J300 series we saw in June.

For our market, that presumably means the LX 600 will be arriving with a new twin-turbo, 3.5-liter V6 that’s supposedly better than the 5.7-liter V8 that went into the previous model. Lexus customers can expect spec sheets listing 409 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. A hybrid variant has also been rumored, with the LX borrowing powertrains from the Toyota Tundra. However, nothing has been confirmed.

Four-wheel drive is absolutely going to be standard, as will three rows of seating, multiple terrain modes, and a 10-speed automatic transmission. But Lexus isn’t giving us much to go on and remaining absolutely silent since the LX 600 is supposed to make its official debut on October 13th.

[Image: Lexus]

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41 Comments on “2022 Lexus LX 600: Return of the Toyota Land Cruiser...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Since the Land Cruiser is so pricey it’s probably a good idea just to keep it under the premium Lexus banner

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There’s a segment of customers that really likes the plain badge on their big expensive SUV. They’ll probably go to Jeep or Chevy in this segment, rather than moving to Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      As I recall, there was only about a $6000 difference between the LC and the LX in the previous generation. I test drove an LX570 and deemed it too narrow. I’d be interested if the next gen has a roomier interior.

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      The standard Land Cruiser makes sense in the Japanese domestic market where the base model retails for 45K USD including the 10% sales tax.

      In the US market where they’re priced to not compete with 4Runners and Sequoias, not so much. Consolidating them to a single Lexus model makes sense. (Same goes for the Prado/GX)

  • avatar
    ajla

    Took about a decade but it looks like the turbo changeover is happening with Toyota.

    The 3.4L V6T is replacing the 4.6L and 5.7L V8s while the 2.4L I4T will very likely be replacing the 3.5L and 4.0L V6s. *I’ve read rumors about the I6 Mazda is bringing out could also be used by RWD-based Toyotas but nothing concrete so far.

    Not sure what will happen with the 5.0L, the IS500 is the final application of the current engine but I don’t know a V6T will work there. Maybe just wait until the solid-state sodium ion EVs exist.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There have been rumors of a low-volume turbo V8 for a long time. If it ever actually becomes real it could be used in an LS 6×0, a LC F, and probably one bonkers smaller F model.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Questions:

      – If a turbocharged vehicle (Toyota or otherwise) ever takes up residence in my driveway, should it be treated any differently than normally-aspirated caveman technology?

      (My limited understanding says a. pay even closer attention to oil changes b. don’t abuse the turbo)
      https://www.holtsauto.com/redex/news/6-ways-protect-turbo-engine/

      – Assuming the previous owner completely ignored all that (this is my driveway after all; we ain’t exactly getting cream puffs) and the turbo is damaged, how big of a deal is replacement/remediation?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Make sure your oil changes are on time. If you stop somewhere immediately after driving extremely hard for an extended time, allow the engine to idle for a minute or two before shutting off, to let circulating oil cool the turbo a bit. Other than those two things, modern turbos don’t need babysitting.

        A turbo replacement on most of these engines is probably a low-four-figure job. Even if you abuse the engine badly, if the oil has been changed on time, I wouldn’t expect a replacement before about 100k miles.

        • 0 avatar
          Sobro

          #5 and #6: The Ford Ecoboost continues to circulate turbo coolant after shutdown. Unless you are tracking it immediately before shutdown there’s no need for a cooldown period. I don’t know about other brands of turbo.

          #1 and #4: Fresh oil is important, agreed. Don’t accept the computer’s oil change interval.

          If you are driving a stick turbo you need to worry about LSPI. Supposedly the new oil formulation, SN Plus, helps prevent it.

          #2: Don’t engage the turbo until the oil warms, not the collant.

          Assuming the PO abused all of the above, you would need to check for carboned intake valves, do a compression test, and not worry about blown-up turbochargers. It’s much more likely to blow the head gasket and ringlands than to blow the turbo.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-speed_pre-ignition

          Newer turbos are receiving port fuel injection in addition to direct fuel injection. Port FI washes the intake valves with detergent gasoline preventing carbon caking, which results in misfires and poor performance.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @Sobro, dal, Scoutdude,

            Thanks very much.

            Two things continually amaze me about this site:
            I) The depth of knowledge/expertise the readers have
            II) The incredibly poor job done by the current management of tapping into that knowledge and expertise

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Assuming the previous owner completely ignored all that (this is my driveway after all; we ain’t exactly getting cream puffs) and the turbo is damaged, how big of a deal is replacement/remediation?

        That is going to be highly dependent on the actual vehicle. In some cars the turbo is fairly accessible and might only be an hour or two to replace, while other are buried and could take several hours to replace. Whether a re-manufactured unit is available or not and if not how proud the mfg is of their parts will also influence just how expensive the job is.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        @ ToolGuy Sir, turbos are much better engineered than in the 80’s. Do some research on lower-boost engines. Overall, you’ll be fine. Changing one out shouldn’t be worse than changing a water pump and less frequently.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree

      The LC 500 also uses the 5.0 V8, rather than the LS 500’s 3.4 TT V6.

      While the 4.6 V8 in our 2021 GX 460 was silky-smooth, it got horrendous fuel economy and was really out-of-breath in the mountains. That car with a turbo or hybrid V6 would have been splendid.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I take a Yukon Denali, Tahoe RST with glorious 6.2 liter engine over weak six cylinder turbo Toyota Land Cruiser (sorry I meant Lexus LX) any day, any time.

    Escalade is in another league, lets be serious.

    No wonder GM is kicking Toyota butt in this segment every day.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      How is the 3.4TT “weak” when it has more of both horsepower and torque than the 6.2?

      And we haven’t seen the 600 yet, but the LX 570 interior was “in another league” from the Impala-grade stuff in the Escalade. GM customers really ought to be insulted by how little effort GM takes to differentiate the product from a Suburban Premier.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      As the owner of a Silverado 1500 (with the “glorious 6.2 liter engine,” it amazes me no end how people buy Suburbans/Tahoes (which are based on the same chassis as the 1/2 ton pickup) and drive them all over suburbia. These things are w-i-d-e and are pretty awkward for use in that setting. I bought the pickup for towing a travel trailer 6 years ago, and I now live outside of a small town. But when I go into metro DC (where I have an apartment), this truck is pretty clumsy. There are parking garages where it can’t go (too tall) and its width and relative large turning circle make parking lots an adventure.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree

        Not to mention that GM is having all kinds of lifter issues with the 6.2, which are grenading in some people’s trucks. It’s not the surefire robust engine that it might once have been.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Even the SUVs in this class are pretty awkward. I had an LX 570 for about a year and a half. There were several parking garages in the city where it was too tall to fit, even at dead stock height, and plenty of parking spots where width was an issue.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @pmirp1 GM doesn’t even try to sell their SUVs in third world countries. No, the gulf state have fine roads; they gotta open up their Ferraris. Someone driving a Land Cruiser would wave as they drove by the broken GM product. Toyota didn’t have to sell Land Cruisers to keep the lights on. Land Cruisers and Lexus LX’s are sold at: here’s our price, thank you. They are not sold at “Truck Month” that seems to be 11 months out of the year or all the other slimy shenanigans GM dealers pull. People buy Toyotas and Lexii knowing they’ve been engineered to survive in third world countries. They’re not designed to impress Roscoe Brown, the concrete king of Joplin MO and his third wife.

  • avatar
    Dan

    The motors keep getting smaller while the numbers on the trunk badge keep getting bigger.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    I was reading that the reason they’ve sold 10 million Land Cruisers (mostly in developing countries) is because they really are engineered to a much higher standard than even other Toyota products. A Silverado/Tahoe is designed for years of the being a work truck – but a work truck in a first world country. A Land Cruiser is designed to work in places where it may see paved roads seldom if ever. And do it for years or decades on end.

    It’s really something special.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I owned a 200-generation LX 570, and if you just looked at the frame and suspension the level of build quality was easy to see. And they last; it’s routine to see functional used ones for sale with 300k or more miles. I hope the 300 stays the same way.

  • avatar
    Crosley

    The twin turbo engine will be way more complicated, cost thousands more to manufacture, require Premium, create more heat underhood and not have as good a powerband as the V8 down low, and not last nearly as long.

    But get 1 mpg better to meet CAFE regulations.

    Progress!

    • 0 avatar
      jmo2

      Nothing you said is accurate.

      • 0 avatar
        conundrum

        No doubt about it, Toyota/Lexus Landcruiser engines are known for blowing up all over the world. And Lexus interiors are just saran wrap quality compared to the Escalade’s hand-carved from solid billet plastic by olde worlde artisans laboring away in Arlington TX, yee haw! — everyone who can draw breath knows that. The quesion remains, will this LX600 be able to navigate curves at better than 0.55g? Because the latest GM Big, Fat and Wides with IRS have the world’s most conservative elctronic nannies.Time after time, C/D can’t get them to whiz around corners at better than grandma speeds, so nobody knows how they handle a real emergency or a back gravel road.

      • 0 avatar
        Mr. Fletcher

        Most of what Crowley stated is true. If a gasoline turbocharged engine is what being spoken of here. The only one completely not the case is NA having a a larger powerband.

        Diesels are different but NA diesels are really a thing today so it’s difficult to make those comparisons to modern versions.

  • avatar

    As I understood from comments it is made for 3rd world countries (or 2nd world countries like Russia which lacks roads in most of the country) and not for US customers since there are a plenty of paved roads in USA. May be Canadians similar to Russians will find these kind of trucks useful?

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Hell, yeah. When we stumble out of our log cabin of a typical morning with yet another foot of snow on the ground, hop into our over $100K looxury SUV, there only remains to navigate a rutted gravel road all the way to the office igloo.

      • 0 avatar

        But you have lot of oil or sand or both, so 100Gs are not that a big deal. Most of Canadian territory is unexplored, most Canadian try to live as close as possible to US border or even to migrate (I hope lawfully) in USA in a search of even better compensation.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I don’t think Canadians are as rich as you think because of oil, the US has lots of oil as well, but only a few can afford a Land Cruiser

        • 0 avatar
          Mr. Fletcher

          Keystone XL was being built so Canadian oil companies could ship there oil out of North America to Europe or Asia where crude oil prices are higher. Domestic US consumption of that oil wasn’t the end end game.

          That and to use underutilized refineries in the Gulf that’s setup to refine heavy Venezuelan oil which is similar to what Canada is exporting from those set of fields.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        I keep my snow shoes at the door !! Some times i just can’t con the dogs to pull the sled !!

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      “Paved roads” is relative. My recent experience in USA is somewhere around 1.7 world.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Canada’s GDP was 1,883,187 (trillion) and per capita it was 49,222.

      Russia’s GDP was 1,710.734 and per capita it was 11,654. Minus whatever Putin and his ‘bizness’ associates skim.

      Canada is a 1st world democracy.
      Russia is a 2nd world kleptocracy.

      So what was the point of your comparison?

      And Canadians buy pick-up trucks. Lots of them. More per capita than in the USA. Canadians also buy far more hatchbacks and manual transmission vehicles per capita than the USA.

      Wishing everyone a happy Thanksgiving weekend. Yep, in Canada it is this weekend.

    • 0 avatar
      GoNavy99

      I live in first world America, and my roads are so great I took the 21″ rims off my LX 570 and replaced them with 18″ TRD rims and BFG KO2s. Not because I want to go offroad, but because leaving my driveway is essentially going offroad.

      Between the dirt roads here, the regular roads with 7 inch deep potholes, and the winter, I’m practically driving offroad every day. At least I don’t have to worry about bent rims or blown tires any longer.

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