By on September 24, 2021

2022 Chevrolet Tahoe

In terms of sales, the Tahoe/Yukon and its larger cousins are the beyond-dominant leaders in the full-size SUV category. Blame (or thank) a robust fleet program that places these brutes in the hands of most security forces across our nation. If you spy a black Tahoe or Suburban parked outside your home … well .. you’ve seen the movies.

This is, in this author’s opinion, part of the cosplay when private individuals buy them for schlepping their family back and forth to school or the soccer game. For the 2021 model year, GM imbued these machines with a dose of new style and more efficient packaging; for 2022, they’ve upped the availability of certain powertrain combinations. It’s the latter that has made Tahoe a great candidate for today’s post.

It’s no secret your author is a fan of the 6.2-liter V8 found in GM’s truck family. The engine has been around for years and, while others have since caught or surpassed it in terms of outright power numbers, the bellow of a NASCAR stocker never gets old. I understand and appreciate the existence of Ford’s PowerBoost hybrid mill – especially with the dandy 7.2kW generator – but an octet of angry cylinders is sound that cannot be replaced.

Fortunately, the crew at Chevy (and GMC) have seen fit to offer the 6.2-liter on a wider number of trims in its full-size SUV lineup. Whereas it was once only available in the bucks-deluxe High Country model, access has been extended to the less-expensive Premier, sporty RST, and – joy of joys – off-road-focused Z71. Similar changes have been made over on the GMC side of the showroom, should one prefer their styling choices.

2022 Chevrolet Tahoe

Four-wheel drive Z71 and RST trims are roughly the same price, within a hair of each other in terms of MSRP at just over 60 large. I’ll choose the off-road variant every day of the week and twice on Sunday, but the color-keyed look of an RST does have appeal if you’re into that type of thing. Selecting the 6.2-liter V8 in either trim also brings Magnetic Ride Control which seeks to smooth out the tarmac and react a bit more appropriately to infernal potholes. In a +1 for the off-roader, Z71 models also get an air suspension and electronic limited-slip diff when the big V8 is installed between the front fenders.

Equipping one’s Tahoe with the $465 Max Trailering Package is one of the easiest decisions you’ll ever make save for choosing to have a second helping of Sunday dinner. It includes an integrated trailer brake controller, better engine cooling, and banzai camera views. Even if you only plan to haul the scattered item, it’s worth the case. I’ve selected the Greywood Metallic which has a slightly greenish tint since you guys are weird and I figured you’d like it.

Expanding the availability of the 6.2-liter to more trims is a smart move by Chevy and yet another vote for not buying a redesigned rig the first year out of its gate. When the world’s supply chain begins to sort itself out and the possibility again exists to order a Tahoe as described above, every security company in the country – plus a few private buyers – should do exactly that.

Please note the prices listed here are in American shekels and currently accurate for base prices exclusive of any fees, taxes, or rebates. Your dealer may (and should) sell for less, obscene market conditions notwithstanding. Keep your foot down, bone up on available rebates, and bargain hard.

[Images: Chevrolet]

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62 Comments on “The Right Spec: 2022 Chevrolet Tahoe...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Wow a journo didn’t pick the diesel engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The current 6.2 should ALWAYS be first choice on any GM/Chevy vehicle that offers it. There is a negligible fuel economy drop compared to the 5.3 and you get all that extra power.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “The current 6.2 should ALWAYS be first choice on any GM/Chevy vehicle that offers it. ”

        I’m a big fan of the 6.2 but I don’t have one complaint about that 5.3 under the hood my 2007 ‘Hoe. 14 years & 180K miles, still runs like a new engine. Smooth as silk, doesn’t leak or burn a drop of oil and up until this point has been absolutely bullet proof. Decent fuel economy for what it is, plenty of power for towing, & overall just a great engine for that truck.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Carlson Fan – If a 5.3 and 6.2 truck are on the lot with the same options I want, I’ll buy the 6.2. Other than purchase price, there isn’t much of a fuel economy penalty. The 5.3 is a decent motor.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            I’d take the 6.2 as well, as long is it wasn’t in a Denali or High Country trim package, which is where you see most of them. Then I’d go w/5.3 in a LTZ or SLT trim package truck.

            Agree there isn’t much if any of a mileage penalty between the two engines. Towing, I suspect the 6.2 would return the exact or better fuel economy than a 5.3.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Here’s the right spec for family truckster. LS trim, 5.3 V8 4×4, front bench (-$250), towing package.

    Cheaper to buy a tablet and connect it to the vehicles wifi than upgrade infotainment. $52,600 total.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’m not sold on if I’d *ever* turn the knob from 2WD but other than that I agree. I think I’d add the rubber floor and cargo mats too.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Wife is going to want a Yukon when supply chains recover. I’ve already planted the seed for the front bench using the middle slot for whichever child is misbehaving on a road trip.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Start saving, spring 2024 will probably be your first real opportunity.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “Start saving, spring 2024 will probably be your first real opportunity.”

            Yep I’d say at the earliest. This thing is gonna get worse I suspect before it gets better. That’s why I plan on sticking some money into the one I got because even though I’m ready for something newer and different, I think it is gonna be with me for a few years yet.

    • 0 avatar
      pmirp1

      Pedestrian trim. Mostly for rental fleets.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        That’s fine I want to be a pleb. I generally keep my vehicle interiors nice but nothing sets me off more than a luxed up SUV with a filthy interior. One of my BIL being a prime example.

        I’m perfectly happy to special order and wait as well.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @PrincipalDan Sir, always good to hear from you. Don’t you get some serious snow out in NM? I’m the D.c. burbs and work from home for our 4-5 snow days.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Here’s the right spec for family truckster. LS trim, 5.3 V8 4×4, front bench (-$250), towing package.”

      Bench seat? Sounds like a good option for killing resale value and making it almost impossible to unload when you’re ready to get rid of it. Why in the world would you want a bench seat in a Tahoe???? Seating for 7 with front buckets won’t cut it? Because they are so comfortable to sit in on long trips?

      My first truck had a bench seat, loved the truck, but what a mistake that was. Should have ponied up and spent the money on the SR5 trim level that came w/buckets.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I have extreme doubts Carvana or Vroom would show a material resale difference.

        I don’t think I’d want the middle spot for “long trips” but cross-county trips with family it might save you needing to take a second vehicle.

        I don’t get the hate for bench seats that some of you guys have. It’s not like the modern ones are contourless, adjustment-free slabs out of the 50s.

        • 0 avatar

          I like the idea of 3 rows of benches. We have a Pilot instead of a Durango somewhat due to the 3 person 3rd row. It doesn’t get a ton of use but it’s very handy when needed. A Tahoe with 3 3 person rows gives you a capacity you can’t get on anything other then a full size van. I would say that cloth seats will ding you more then the bench front row on resale.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Ya know you can have enough fun on a front bench to more than make up for resale. Heck my wife and I some heavy make out sessions in the front of my F150 when we were dating.

        The modern ones fold into a console when not using them.

        BTW I hate center row captains chairs too.

        Why yes my favorite cars growing up were box B-body wagons.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The “bench” in the Tahoe/Suburban has the same bucket seats as the bucket/console option, just with a padded kinda-seat between them instead of the big fat console.

        I don’t know where my wife would put her purse without the big console, though.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          “The “bench” in the Tahoe/Suburban has the same bucket seats as the bucket/console option, just with a padded kinda-seat between them instead of the big fat console.”

          Can’t say I’ve seen a GMT-800 ‘Hoe or newer with a front bench seat but your telling me they are the same seats minus the console?

          There is no 3rd air bag or headrest so not a place I’d stick one of my 3 kids and don’t want 3 adults across the front, just give me the console.

          My boat has a big bench seat if I want to have fun w/GF. More fun on the water anyways & you can go for a swim afterwards!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yep, in the ’21+ the outer seat portions are exactly the same.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Boat? Bring Out Another Thousand.

            FYI the front bench comes with a revised airbag to cover 3 passengers. (At least according to the 2021 configuration tool.)

            GM had an airbag system to cover all 3 front passengers going back to the last of the Fleetwood Broughams.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “GM had an airbag system to cover all 3 front passengers going back to the last of the Fleetwood Broughams.”

            Good to know, but still doesn’t have a head rest so none of my kids, myself or anyone else I care about is sitting in that seat, let’s just put a console there!……..LOL

            I always tell people that anyone who thinks boats are hard on the wallet have never owned a snowmobile. That’s been my anecdotal experience anyways.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    No Build and Price up for 2022, I’d want that active before declaring something the right spec.

    As it is, my input is to just get the Suburban.

    • 0 avatar
      pmirp1

      Over 70,000. GM authority has information on colors and availability. Order open on October 4th. PRobably then available online. If you don’t have 70 large minimum ready to spend, don’t ask.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    The RST comes with 22″ wheels/tires.

    On my nephew’s GMT800 pickup, we recently changed the horrendous 22-inch wheels/tires back to the stock 16-inch size. (Highly recommend discounttiredirect.com – mounted and balanced ready to install in the driveway. Watch for sales/specials/rebates.)

    Besides a *dramatically* better ride, he got 75 more miles from his first tank of gas after the change.

    My considered but uneducated ranked list of reasons why:
    • Rotational inertia
    • Significantly reduced jounce (all that vertical motion doesn’t get us down the road and isn’t ‘free’ from a fuel perspective)
    • Less vehicle mass in general [minor effect]

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “On my nephew’s GMT800 pickup, we recently changed the horrendous 22-inch wheels/tires back to the stock 16-inch size.”

      This is the way.

      • 0 avatar
        The Comedian

        My leftover-on-the-lot ‘16 Tahoe LS came with 20” rims (the only option on the sticker).

        I’ve been running 17” steelies in the winter since Feb ‘17 and the ride is dramatically better than on the 20s.

        I wanted to get my money’s worth out of the OEM tires, but when they’re done next year I may pick a set of 18” OEM takeoffs for non-winter use.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          “I wanted to get my money’s worth out of the OEM tires, but when they’re done next year I may pick a set of 18” OEM takeoffs for non-winter use.”

          The suspension on that Tahoe was tuned for those 20″ wheels, not 18″ wheels, so I find it hard to believe that it rides and handles better. Plus now your gearing is all screwed up as running 18″ vs the 20″ is a big change.

          My 2007 ‘Hoe has been relegated to towing and road trip duty only as it is not my DD. That said the gearing is spot on when running in “3” for towing which is why I would never ever consider putting a different wheel & tire on that truck than what it came with from the factory. The engineers at GM knew what they were doing.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            “The suspension on that Tahoe was tuned for those 20″ wheels, not 18″ wheels, so I find it hard to believe that it rides and handles better.”

            • Suspension tuning can only do so much. Sticking with The Comedian’s lived experience here.

            “Plus now your gearing is all screwed up as running 18″ vs the 20″ is a big change.”

            • Maybe, maybe not depending on aspect ratio.

            “The engineers at GM knew what they were doing.”

            • Agreed. My question is, would the world be a happier place if the engineers at GM who know what they are doing were allowed to spec out smaller wheels/tires with more sidewall, even on upper trims.

          • 0 avatar
            The Comedian

            18” was the standard OEM wheel size for the 2016 Tahoe LS.

            My Tahoe came with 20” wheels as a factory option.

            Your comment about gearing changes based on wheel size differences suggests that you must think that I am a moron and/or you don’t understand the difference between tires and wheels.

            OEM base wheel is 265/65-18 which has an outside diameter of 31.56”

            OEM optional wheel is 275/55-20, outside diameter is 31.91”

            If I accept your preposterous suggestion that this constitutes “a big change in gearing” then simply running the 20s down to their wear bars would meet the same criteria.

            The engineers at GM did know what they were doing, that’s why the default OEM wheels are 18”, and the 20s are sold as a cosmetic upgrade.

            The suspension parts do not differ in any way for vehicles shipped with either wheel size. (I suppose the alignment specs might differ, but the “tuning” is otherwise the same.)

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Besides a *dramatically* better ride, he got 75 more miles from his first tank of gas after the change”

      Went from a 16″ wheel to a 22″ wheel without changing the gearing and his fuel economy turned to crap?
      That’s pretty much what I would expect.

      I’ll bet my GMT-900 w/20″ wheels is as easy on a gallon of gas as his GMT-800 running 16″ wheels. Probably easier.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        “Went from a 16″ wheel to a 22″ wheel without changing the gearing and his fuel economy turned to crap?
        That’s pretty much what I would expect.”

        • The fuel economy didn’t -turn- to crap, it went from Not Very Good to Not Very Good. (He didn’t make the change, the ‘mechanic’ he purchased the truck from did.)

        • Overly Simplistic Approach to Life would say 37.5% increase in diameter (22 over 16) means 37.5% change in circumference [and revolutions/mile] (multiply by pi, no square terms, right?).

        • But the aspect ratio changes. Here is a calculator:
        https://tiresize.com/tyre-size-calculator/

        • And here are our specific figures (again, the second tire size wasn’t chosen by me or by him):
        Size 1 235/75R16
        Size 2 285/45R22

        • Calculator says 6.8% decrease in revolutions/mile. Can we make a gear ratio change that ‘small’? (I don’t know.) Aren’t we on the wrong side of the fuel economy argument now? (I don’t know.)

        “I’ll bet my GMT-900 w/20″ wheels is as easy on a gallon of gas as his GMT-800 running 16″ wheels. Probably easier.”

        • Ok. What I am more interested in is the observed fuel economy of a GMT-900 w/ factory-spec’d 20″ wheels vs. the observed fuel economy of a comparable same-model-year GMT-900 with factory-spec’d smaller wheels. [The rotational inertia is real. The reduced sidewall/increased jounce is also real – suspension tuning can help *some* (as would Magnetic Ride Control).]

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          My ex- BIL had a Platinum F150 on 20’s and I had an XLT on 18’s. Spec wise, there wasn’t much of difference in height or circumference. Our drivetrains were identical. His MPG was worse but he was an admitted lead-foot. Being a Staff Sergeant with the RCMP meant that he had no fear of traffic violations.

          One should look at the weight of the tires and wheels. A down size from a 22 to 16 wheel might shed weight off the wheel but you’ll most likely end up with a heavier tire.

          I lost MPG going from stock 4 ply tires to 10 ply for three reasons; 1. heavier tire; 2. off-road oriented tread pattern; 3. Softer winter rated tires.

  • avatar
    MUSASHI66

    I’d love the off-road trim if the suspension pieces weren’t 4″ off the ground

    https://gmauthority.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-Chevrolet-Tahoe-Z71-Middle-East-Exterior-019-rear-end-dirt-road.jpg

  • avatar
    dal20402

    There’s no right spec for a Tahoe. If you’re going to buy a giant truck-based SUV, there’s little loss and much gain from going to Suburban length. But I don’t tow big trailers, and so a vehicle of this type gets me nothing except worse fuel economy and a $10k+ higher price compared to a large unibody CUV. The right spec here is to head over to the Hyundai dealer and buy a loaded Palisade.

    At least now with the IRS the third-row seat is usable.

    • 0 avatar
      pmirp1

      Sure you can get a Jeep Grand Cherokee. I have one of those now. Not a bad vehicle. I am trading it in.

      These are the personal luxury cars of current era. or F150 King Ranch. You either get it or you don’t. If you want to not embrass yourself in the country club, it is the way to go. Otherwise, feel free to get a Lexus Rx or a sedan of any type, and well, you are not the country club type then.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “you are not the country club type then.”

        Definitely not inaccurate. I generally go to a different type of club.
        Anyway enjoy your Tahoe and whatever they do at country clubs.

        • 0 avatar
          el scotto

          @ajla Sir, there are country clubs where you write a check to join and country clubs where you have to be invited. Gues where the Tahoe’s are parked.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I honestly don’t know and I don’t care.

            Whether you folks are paying your way into country clubs or getting invited and whether you are driving Range Rovers or Tahoe RSTs and whether you’re looking to impress Count Hemingway Princeton III or Roscoe James, the Concrete King of Joplin. None of it is my scene either way.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I’m here trying to raise two kids on one income in a city where the median house price is $1 million. I don’t have time or money to think about things like country clubs.

        But at the country clubs around here, you better have a Range Rover or Benz GLS.

        • 0 avatar
          pmirp1

          Range Rover and GLS are for wives. Husbands drive the Ford F150 King Ranch and high trim GM triplet big SUVs. well at least here in the south.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Different cultures in different places. Here, the Range Rover’s probably his, and either he or she might be driving the GLS (although they’ll be trimmed out a bit differently).

            The King Ranch won’t fit in the parking garage in the downtown building where his office is.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    As I said earlier today, the Tahoe RST with 6.2 is my next ride. In Grey Green. Can’t wait. October 4th.

    I have a Vette and a Mustang GT in the garage. Some of us know where its at. Its American V8 vehicles that rule. They are expensive. No lease specials on these.

    They are the old money vehicles. Yukon Denali, Tahoe with 6.2 easily go over 70,000. Old men like me drive them and we look at petite German SUVs or little electrics and smile. We know where its at.

    These are the absolute pinnacle of driving for old money folks who don’t want to drive King Ranch trucks or Laramie Longhorn RAMs.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @pmirp1 Sir, just no. Old money went to Mercedes in the late 70’s and Lexus when the 1st LS came out. Reference Toyota Land Cruiser/Lexus LX/GX and Lexus LS sedan/Chevy Suburban LTZ/Ford Expedition XLT. Anything that is full (red/green running lights) size, has the biggestV-8 that can fit in and last 250,000 miles is old money. One could easily argue that American V-8’s are expensive when all you’re used to buying is American cars. Chineseum electrics and false profits from a wash and rinse bankruptcy do not bode well for the future of a company. Outside of Suburbans most GM products should be sold at outlet malls. It’d save everyone lots of time. Fourth generation country club; third generation master’s degree. If you don’t park your boat at the country club; what is your tow vehicle doing there?

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “If you don’t park your boat at the country club; what is your tow vehicle doing there?”

        LOL! Great comment and right on. Tahoes aren’t made for driving to country clubs, they’re built to tow with the family inside. Not towing with a ‘Hoe on a regular basis is a complete waste. In fact the only reason you should be shopping for one in the first place is because you need something to tow your new toy which is heavy enough to require tandem axles.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        This city’s not old enough for really old money, but the oldest money in the city migrated sometime in the past decade from Benz wagons to big European SUVs, with the occasional Land Cruiser or Lexus LX thrown in. Mostly this means Range Rovers, GLSes, Volvo XC90s, Audi Q7s, and now BMW X7s. You might find one of them with a Suburban or Yukon XL from time to time, but never ever ever an Escalade.

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        El Scotto, going to Taledga races next weekend. Great races. Double guarantee I see many Tahoe’s and Yukon’s and Suburbans (sure you mentioned that) and Escalades. All my country club friends and wives going. And some F150s.

        Double guarantee you see no Lexus Lx, Land Cruiser(even Toyota is not going to sell that in America any more), nor God forbid a poverty level six cylinder Lexus LS.

        You ride with a different crowd and country club set is not it.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          Country club – is that where the Trilateral Commission has its meetings? (Or am I thinking of the Council on Foreign Relations?)

          Does your country club have an owl shrine? Does its motto refer to “Weaving Spiders”?

          Nevermind.

      • 0 avatar

        I live in CT land of steady habits, Lots of old money and money in general. Most old money have some kind of premium sedan (MB BMW Audi Lexus) as a daily driver then a Lexus RX or similar in the garage stall next to it. If they have hobbies that involve towing (horses boats etc) there is almost always large American metal in the drive way, typically GM fullsizer or a Grand Cherokee. I used to go to yacht clubs a lot for work 5-10 years ago. Typically the only American vehicles in the lot is Jeep or GM fullsizers.
        Note here Im not talking about eclectic old money Yankees. Many of them are still nursing around 20 year old European cars (wagons) an d spending way to much in the process. Or if they are full on CT river valley Yankees, they have Ford escort as their errands car they bought new in 1993 with 40k miles on it and a 2008 Lexus ES/ Saab 9-5 as their going out to dinner car.

  • avatar
    redapple

    I m at the age and wealth level where I want / deserve something nice. I d like higher level trims but those require leather. Leather is hot in the summer. Cold in the winter. I wish a lux or groovy cloth was popular. So, i ll have to sort that out.

    I ll also have to sort out the 6.2 tonawanda unit versus the Flint made inline 6 diesel.

    Chevy ? No. Butt ugly. GMC Denali for me. 4WD. I ll have to get one before compliance vehicles are all that you can buy. Dirty lying lib commies. Ever notice that all your buddies that are perverts are demoncats?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Ever notice that all your buddies that are perverts are demoncats?”

      LOL. Um. No. Bit of a mixed bag.

      In Canada our Prime minister would fit your observations but he’d NEVER be a buddy of mine. I’m too honest and too plebian for him. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @redapple Sir, or avid church goers. Or obese or both. YMMV. On a serious note; if you get a GM discount, go GM. Heated seat work well on aching backs. Cooled seats cool your nether regions on hot days. My retired parents are down to four vehicles: Suburban LTZ, Lexus LX, Mustang GT convertible and and an E-Z go golf cart. The E-Z go gets the most miles.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Can you park your straight-pipe bagger Harley next to it?

  • avatar
    Dan

    1. God these are ugly. A year and a half later they haven’t grown on me at all. Four generations of conservative and classy, and now this. The GMC is, as always, less bad.

    2. The 6.2 V8 is the best thing – IMO the only good thing that isn’t the C8 – that GM has right now so there’s your obvious answer. As of 2021 you only get there one way, and that way is $75,000 which is eye popping even in monopoly money and makes the $51,000 2WD LS that a sane person would settle for seem almost reasonable. The 2022 build site isn’t there yet, so post this again when it is.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I would say if you need and/or want a Tahoe or Suburban including GMC you better buy now if you want a V8. Eventually GM will be forced to go to turbo V-6s to increase mpgs to comply with future standards. If I were buying a vehicle like this I would go with the split bench seat with the center armrest just for the comfort and practicality. Many who buy these type of vehicles buy them to drive and keep for years so any little extra depreciation will not matter that much especially if you keep a vehicle 10 plus years. I would take a bench seat and column shift on a full size vehicle over bucket seats and a huge console in the middle when given the choice. In most vehicles you do not have an option to get a bench seat.

    Since I am not in the market for a large suv or truck I am more interested in smaller and more fuel efficient but then I don’t tow a trailer or a boat. My Isuzu I-370 had a tow package which I never used and was a very capable truck I just didn’t need it nor did I ever use it to its full capacity.

  • avatar
    Socrates77

    The ecoboost from ford, specially in the raptor is way better engine. I wish they made a ecoboost v6 in a off road expedition.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Well there are many who do not want a turbocharged V6 engine especially if the vehicle is heavy and will be used for towing and heavy hauling especially for those who want to keep their vehicles for a long time. A turbocharged engine will for the most part not last for 100s of thousands of miles. Eventually there will be no non turbo V8s or any V8s available. Most of the new vehicles that are midsize and below are offering turbo 3s and 4s and that will continue until there are few if any ICE vehicles produced.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Based on actual in-service performance I’d have more confidence in a Ford 3.5TT to go the distance than a GM Gen V V8. The Gen Vs had a really rocky introduction, although I wouldn’t be surprised if newer-build examples perform better over time. Meanwhile both generations of Ford 3.5s have turned in quite impressive records.

      • 0 avatar

        The Gen V are weird I know a lot of people with them and they are either perfect or nightmares. The worse part is many of the problems are similar to issues with earlier ones mostly cylinder deactivation and oil consumption issues. One would hope they would have fixed those after years of known issues. Oddest thing is the 4.3 (silverado not tahoe) share many design features with the 5.3 but seem to be more reliable.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    SUVs are not my thing, but the last time I drove a Tahoe was a 2018 rental with the 5.3L and I loved the bloody thing! I can’t imagine how much better this is and with a 6.2L.

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