By on January 24, 2022

Viewed in a vacuum, especially through the filtered lens of an online picture, the Hyundai IONIQ 5 might appear to be a hatchback roughly the size of a VW Golf. In reality, it’s a lot more crossover-like inside and out, with the added bonus of seating flexibility that eliminates a space-hogging center console which creates a spiritual successor to the old-school bench seat.

There is a quartet of trims offered in our market, starting with the $39,700 SE Standard Range with its single motor and rear-wheel drive.

That’s good for 168 horsepower and an estimated 220 miles from its 58.0-kWh battery pack. If those numbers aren’t appealing, an extra $3,950 will net the SE trim (sans the ‘Standard Range’ moniker) which has a 77.4-kWh battery and approximately 300 miles of range. Interestingly, a rear-drive IONIQ 5 with the larger battery makes 225 horses, pushing the all-electric car to 60 mph from rest in about 7.4 seconds according to Hyundai.

Looking for dual motors and 320 horsepower? You’ll need to upgrade to an all-wheel-drive model, a configuration offered on all trims save for the entry-level SE Standard Range. This is a wise decision by Hyundai since it means customers can get the most powerful options without having to pop for a bucks-deluxe trim level. Note that, thanks to extra weight and other gubbins, the estimated range drops to an indicated 256 miles in the all-wheel-drive model. The least expensive AWD wears a sticker price of $47,550.

Externally, there’s not a ton of difference between the four trims, meaning your snooty neighbors won’t know the difference if you bought the least- or most-expensive IONIQ 5. There’s something to be said for creative design, a signature characteristic of this car with its dot-matrix fore and aft lighting which somehow manages to recall sealed beam headlamps but in a way that’s thoroughly modern. The top two trims do feature a unique-to-them front ‘v’ light bar and some extra silver-look garnish.

Inside, the SE is this car’s only trim with cloth seats; if it’s that upholstery you’re after, go ahead and end your search right there. All trims get heated seats, a large 12.3-inch infotainment touchscreen paired with an equal-size digital gauge cluster, dual-zone climate, and safety nannies like smart cruise control. The SEL sets itself apart by including comforts like wireless device charging and a heated steering wheel plus 2nd-row ventilation and a power liftgate.

Limited trim ($50,600 or $54,500 with all-wheel drive) adds vehicle-to-load technology via a two-way onboard charger in the second row. This permits owners to use their car as an enormous battery pack, allowing the electric car to power everyday items when it would otherwise be sitting idle. Whether this is a selling point is up to individual preferences, but we can think of ample opportunities to press this into service both on the road and at home. Typical comfort stuff like a heads-up display and Bose audio also pop up on the Limited.

An all-wheel-drive SEL and rear-wheel drive Limited both come in right around 50 grand, making for an interesting choice of vehicles. The former has a lot more power and can whip to 60 mph in about five seconds, while the latter has braggable-to-EV-friends features like being able to power items in your home. We’d choose the extra power and AWD grip, naturally.

Please note the prices listed here are in Yankee bucks and are currently accurate for base prices exclusive of any fees, taxes, or rebates. Your dealer may (and should) sell for less (obscene market conditions notwithstanding). Keep your foot down, bone up on available rebates, and bargain hard.

[Images: Hyundai]

Become a TTAC insider. Get the latest news, features, TTAC takes, and everything else that gets to the truth about cars first by subscribing to our newsletter.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

34 Comments on “The Right Spec: 2022 Hyundai IONIQ 5...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    What’s Hyundai’s aversion to brighter paint options when it comes to this and the Santa Cruz?

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I can only blame white, black and grey/silver as being the top selling colors year after year. Apparently non-color = non-risk. For the SC they went these muted earth tones and tried to put a marketing spin on the palette being based on the outdoors, but many are disappointed by the lack of fun, bright colors on the little trucklet. I’m getting one (eventually) in Blue Stone as its the most colorful of the non-colors they offer. The Sage green color is so dull it can be mistaken for gray under certain lighting conditions. Sand (Tan) is rumored to be discontinued yet the factory is still building them but in extremely low numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Yeah, the bland colors are disappointing. The colors look better in video, at least on the Ioniq 5, but how hard would it be to add a red or blue color option?

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I like the looks of it. I like the KIA version even better. But it’s still way too expensive compared to ICE competition IMO. Even with taxpayers involuntarily kicking in the first years payments it’s too pricey but it makes me wonder if a market competitive model might be getting very close. Our NY village idiot governor just added millions more to the taxpayer handout for EV purchases so maybe these will start to make a dent in the local market.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      The people that make the rules and hand out the money believe EV’s will not sell without both regulations requiring EV and incentives for EV.

      Are EV’s really that terrible of a vehicle compared to ICE?

      • 0 avatar
        Greg Hamilton

        OberKanone,

        I guess the only way to find out is to bring an EMF meter with you next time you drive one and see how many microTeslas you are exposed to. No one has done that as far as I know.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      It looks roomy and spacious inside, an illusion augmented by the lack of sun visors and rear view mirror. There’s probably more stuff missing, too – it looks rather empty.

      In two years time, this will be available used for half the new cost, as less-expensive vehicles with twice the range are offered. (You can hold me to this prediction!)

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Not available in my home state.

    2022 IONIQ 5 will be available in early 2022 in AZ, CA, CO, CT, FL, IL, ME, MD, MA, NJ, NY, OR, PA, RI, TX, VT, VA, and WA.

    • 0 avatar
      haze3

      Reasonable complaint, though most are next to such a state, if they are interested.

      These are compliance states, I guess, but it seems the limitation is H/K’s way to control demand as battery supply is an issue for a full 50 state rollout.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Availability will widen to all 50 states after US production starts (coinciding with increased battery production).

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Love the ColecoVision exterior – absolutely love it! Kudos to Hyundai for leaning into this design idea.

    But that interior – blech. Did the design teams talk to each other? The interior of the Santa Fe is MUCH better than this.

    And for being above 50k, this is ridiculous.

    Damn pity.

  • avatar
    mcs

    The H/K EVs, maybe the Ioniq 6, are currently at the top of my list for my next daily driver EV. I’m starting to hear more and more horror stories about Tesla’s lack of support after the sale. Way too many stories.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Not bad but I’d rather have a Tesla Model 3 or Y Long Range. Faster and longer range than any model of the Ioniq.

    • 0 avatar
      haze3

      It’s fair, of course, but cost matters to many and the prices are not really in the same range. Min spec Model 3 is $47K with no rebates (good luck getting that car) and the Y is in the $60-$65K range.

      The low-end Ioniq starts at $40K before rebate. The base Ioniq is bigger than the 3 and a little slower with slightly less range but the net transaction is likely $10-15K cheaper. After rebate, the $50K Ioniq saves a solid $20K over a comparable Y.

      It’s a little like comparing a Honda CR-V to the size-comparable BMW or Lexus SUV. The comp is not apples to apples just b/c both are EV’s.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There’s an Ioniq 5N on the way and unlike Teslas, the Ioniq 5 is able to get a lot closer to its stated range in real world conditions.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Bigger brother Ioniq 7 will be on our shopping list once it is out. This one doesn’t have quite enough space to serve as our trip car.

    I’d have to test drive both SEL and Limited. I don’t really care about the car-to-house power, but I’d have to weigh the bigger sunroof (a huge positive for me) against the ride quality penalty of the Limited’s larger wheels.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    40k @ 220 miles of range, or more like 180 miles of range that you’d be willing to safely count on.
    Where do I not sign up?
    Yup, those battery prices are dropping every day. Or not. Because maybe, just maybe, things like batteries and other commodities don’t obey the imaginary “Moore’s Law”, that’s not actually allow and really refers to computers and integrated circuits. Most things get more expensive with time and with demand. EV’s will never reach price parity with ICE vehicles, they’ll always be 10-15k more expensive and they always be saddled with range issues and charging issues. Because Moore’s Law won’t help them charge faster either.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Never” is a very long time.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Never say never again.

        • 0 avatar
          Imagefont

          The point is, we have economy of scale and the ability to reduce battery prices further is limited, as in diminishing returns. Past price reductions have nothing to do with future price reductions, unless you can point to a reason why they would continue to get cheaper. Banks on as yet unknown innovations and undiscovered tech is not realistic. Everything reaches a predictable limit. BEV’s will (probably) never approach price parity with ICE vehicles unless government mandates make ICE vehicles more expensive to purchase. 10 years of electric vehicles and 40k gets you 220 miles or theoretical maximum range, 180 of which you can safely count on.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Battery costs are being reduced by eliminating expensive materials like cobalt and even nickel. Na+ even eliminates the need for lithium and complex controllers. Both LFP and Na+ will start to lower costs. LFP is doing it now and is in mass production where Na+ is still ramping up production, but available for purchase..

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            MCS, you are trying to battle opinions with informed factual information. You’re on the side of the good guys, but the truth has an uphill battle over those who assume that their opinion will always be correct.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            If only there were an example of an evolving tech (cough memory cough) that refuted every facet of your argument.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Moore’s Law is a straw man when it comes to batteries; nobody is claiming batteries will follow it.

      Economies of scale and improved production methods have already reduced battery costs substantially in the last decade, but to you that’s fake news.

      2012 Leaf: $38k, 73 miles range, 50 kW charge rate max, slow car
      2022 Ioniq 5: $40k, 220 miles range, 350 kW charge rate max, quick car

      Yep – no changes.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        Another fact: 2012 Leaf battery density 133 Wh/kg. The Tesla 4680 battery is 380 Wh/kg. Gravimetric density is important in that a vehicle can be lighter and require a smaller battery to achieve a given range. Smaller battery means less cost and more miles/minute charging rate. I’ve heard rumors that the Model Y with the 4680 pack is 400 lbs lighter.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “Yup, those battery prices are dropping every day. Or not.”

      Well, they have been doing so consistently for a decade, but in a free country you have the right to remain ignorant if you wish.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      We’re not talking Tesla level of real world range, so I’d say more like can safely expect 200 mi of range (unless it’s bitter cold) for most drivers.

  • avatar
    fleeecy

    The V2L capability is on every IONIQ5. The external adapter is an accessory, some separately.

    Limited models add an outlet inside the car for this same feature.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    My right spec is probably the SE or SEL RWD, Long Range 77 kWh. I don’t need more speed or AWD. The range sacrifice on the AWD is shocking.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Saw my first one just yesterday, a very handsome car, looks far more expensive than it is. Nice size and packaging and much more like a wagon than an SUV.

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    I like the interior. But I don’t see the value over let’s say a Mach-E or even a Bolt EUV

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • dal20402: “The only reason EVs exist is because of mindless politicians” I would have bought my EV...
  • Arthur Dailey: The ‘horizontal’ GM speedo was not only ugly, it took excessive space and was as posted...
  • EBFlex: Red apple you are 110% spot on! Thank you for being a voice of reason. EVs are an expensive boondoggle and...
  • Master Baiter: Seats look surprisingly large for a Jap car. Most have thigh cushions designed for a Korean...
  • EBFlex: “ Now, you do know that when the power goes out, the pumps at the gas station don’t work, right?” Ah yes. We...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber