By on May 25, 2021

Hyundai Ioniq 5The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 ultra-fast charging crossover utility vehicle was revealed yesterday, highlighting its Electric-Global Modular Platform (E-GMP).

Ioniq 5’s 300-mile range, and 10-to-80 percent ultra-fast charging in 18 minutes showcases E-GMP technology.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Outside, the ’45’ EV concept influenced the Ioniq 5’s design, while the chassis design adds more interior space.

Ioniq 5 has the longest wheelbase in Hyundai’s U.S. product lineup at 118.1 inches.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Introducing 23 battery electric vehicles (BEV) by 2025, Hyundai expects sales of 1 million units.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

“Ioniq 5 introduces the Hyundai brand to a whole new set of buyers,” said José Muñoz, president and CEO, Hyundai Motor America.

“Once behind the steering wheel, the range, power, comfort, interior space and advanced technology are shocking.”

“Owning one is going to be a new experience and lifestyle that only the Ioniq brand can provide.”

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Six Ioniq 5-exclusive exterior colors, include Phantom Black Pearl, Cyber Gray Metallic, Atlas White, Digital Teal, Lucid Blue Pearl, and Shooting Star Gray Matte.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Obsidian Black Monotone, Dark Pebble Gray/Dove Gray, and Dark Teal/Dove Gray are the interior color choices.

Three drive motor arrangements exist. There’s a  77.4 kWh battery pack with to two electric motors, a single rear motor, or front and rear motors.

The all-wheel drive (AWD) dual motor combo produces 320 horsepower (74 kW front + 165 kW rear) and 446 ft-lbs of torque. With AWD, the Ioniq 5 will do 0-60 MPH in under 5 seconds.

The 2WD single rear motor makes 225 HP (168 kW) and 258 ft-lbs of torque. With a single motor, 300 miles is the targeted driving range. The AWD dual motor setup has a 269-mile targeted range, and the Limited AWD model has a 244-mile range. Top speed is 115 MPH for all Ioniqs, and they have a trailer towing capacity of 1,500 pounds.

With a 350-kW charger, Ioniq 5 can go from 10-80 percent in 18 minutes. If there’s only five minutes to recharge, the Ioniq 5 can recoup 68 miles of range using a fast charger.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

Hyundai took the opportunity to announce an agreement with Electrify America to provide Hyundai Ioniq 5 drivers with two years of unlimited, 30-minute charging sessions at Electrify America charging stations.

This announcement is a continuation of an agreement to provide 250 kilowatt-hours of complimentary charging on Electrify America’s network for 2021 Kona Electric and Ioniq Electric owners.

Ioniq 5 goes on sale this fall, with undisclosed benefits for early adopters.

[Images: Hyundai]

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32 Comments on “2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Fast Charging CUV Exposed...”


  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Good-looking vehicle on the outside, but that interior looks like the inside of a “car” in a TV commercial where they want to make sure you can’t identify the brand of any other products while they’re explaining the side effects of Trevior® for women who are pregnant or may potentially become pregnant. Between the platform mates, I’ll take the Kia.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    The diagonal crease makes it look like two different cars welded together in the middle.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is very promising and far more appealing than the Kona EV. I want to see the next size up, corresponding to the gas Palisade. If it can also have 300-mile range and fast L3 charging, it might be good enough to allow us to go all-electric.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Well that’s encouraging.

  • avatar
    JMII

    “Ioniq 5 has the longest wheelbase in Hyundai’s U.S. product lineup at 118.1 inches.”

    Interesting… this is the same wheelbase as the new Santa Cruz UTE. I assume this is a completely different platform but sure seems like a odd coincidence.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This is at the top of my “next EV” list, although I still may just keep the Ioniq 1 after the lease is up.

    At least the 5 will be sold in PA, which is a first for Hyundai.

  • avatar
    Syke

    The future of EV’s is not with the popular obsession of range, but rather charging speed. Any EV that can put out 250-300 mile range is practical, the big question is how long do you have to sit at the DCFC station to re-80%-top-off. Get the charging rate fast enough to pretty much match a usual gas station stop (including leg stretching, pee break, and grab a munchie/drink after spending the 5-8 minutes overseeing the gas pump) and the last objections (other than those who will object just for the sake of objecting, hate EV’s, or consider them a liberal plot) are moot.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @syke: The dual/multiport trick I’ve been using for my non-car vehicles etc. that I have built works great. You electrically divide the battery, then each section gets its own charger and cable. I even have one small device/cell charger that came dual ported from the factory. I also think that’s the real reason the Taycon has two doors. Future dual-porting.

      I think the Tesla semi is using it with the megachargers by the looks of the charging port photos:

      https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-semi-megacharger-charging-port-close-up-look/

      There are also new batteries that can handle higher speeds. Tesla is already using Lithium-iron in China. There are others that could handle higher rates, but until those batteries are in mass-production, I’m not counting them.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Aluminum ion batteries are in the works. They have less range by volume, but charge very quickly, don’t wear out and weigh much less than lithium ion.
        In ten years, the electric vehicles on offer will make today’s look like Model Ts.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Spot on. As long as the range matches a typical ICE which might be like 400 miles max its the recharge time and/or availability to recharge (locations) that creates range anxiety and seems to be holding back EV adoption. For typical commuter usage the range is even less of a worry if people were honest with themselves. For example my wife has pretty much NEVER driven more then 100 miles in a day unless she was on a road trip with me.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        This. We own a Bolt that advertised 238 miles new and typically discharges at a rate that would give us between 150 miles (depth of winter) and 250 (summer). We’ve had it for two years and driven about 10,000 miles. In that time it has been below 50% charge *once*. We have another car that does the road trips. For this in-town car, we could have zero range anxiety ever with 150 miles brochure range, and be fine 98% of the time with 125 miles.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “We have another car that does the road trips.”

          That’s a pretty important sentence though.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That car would need to be replaced by a long-range EV with faster fast charging than the Bolt. A Tesla S 100D or LRP would work fine, as will plenty of future EVs. Four hours of driving without a stop is about the max for our family, so 300 miles is just right.

            But families don’t need every EV to have a massive 300-mile battery. One 300-mile EV and one 150-mile EV will work just fine for the typical two-car family.

          • 0 avatar
            Kendahl

            https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a36302930/tesla-model-s-long-range-plus-highway-range-testing/

            Although EPA range is 402 miles, C&D got only 320 in its highway test. That’s 80% of the EPA number and matches what other tests have found. Some of Tesla’s competition gets an even lower percentage of their EPA number. I’d be interested in a Model 3 Long Range which has an EPA estimate of 353 miles. 80% of that is 282 miles. Since running the battery flat does long term damage, 250 is a more likely limit.

            Several years ago, another road test, also conducted by C&D if I remember correctly, found that you couldn’t cover the 300 miles between Chicago and Saint Louis without a stop to recharge even though that distance was nominally within the car’s range. (When I pointed this out, the EV fanbois complained that driving 300 miles without a 30- to 60-minute rest stop was unrealistic and even “dangerous”.)

            Superficially, the Ioniq 5 looks like a good try that’s still a bit short of Tesla’s engineering. Personally, I want an AWD EV with the size and performance of a Golf R and a nominal range of 400 miles so that I can get a real 300.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          I actually have more range anxiety with my gas cars because I’m so used to the EV always having a full “tank” every time I unplug it. The gas cars are gas-guzzling toys so it makes the problem worse.

          @JMII: “For example my wife has pretty much NEVER driven more than 100 miles in a day ”

          I’m the same way. Nevermore than 250 in a day in the last 15 years. I fly if it’s further. Or, if it’s a long road trip, I’m stopping to see things don’t cover a lot of distance in a day.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Nevermore than 250 in a day”
            “I actually have more range anxiety with my gas cars…The gas cars are gas-guzzling toys”

            Do you have a Hispano Suiza or something?

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            Maybe he has a Viper.

            Approximately the same fuel economy as my truck with a tank 1/3 the size. If I’m hustling, I’m filling every 200 miles or so.

            Still a faster road trip than an EV though.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            It isn’t because of the mileage (although one can sometimes get 7mpg), it’s because I forget to fill the things. Because of the EV, I’m not used to having to deal with having to go somewhere to fill or even look at the gauge. Most of the time, I really don’t even look at the EVs charge gauge either. I’ve had some tight moments suddenly seeing the low fuel light come on and not sure if I can make it to a gas station. Also, gas stations near me seem to have banker’s hours.

            Years ago, I think it was in La Joya CA, some guy talked on social media about his nicer cars on social media, then mentioned he was going on vacation. While he was gone, someone stole his car. I’ve been reluctant to talk about my cars other than the daily driver fleet.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Oh yeah, Car and Driver had some interesting results with its 75 MPH range test:

            https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a36302930/tesla-model-s-long-range-plus-highway-range-testing/

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            BTW, there happens to be a 1915 Hispano-Suiza owner that lives about 4 or 5 miles away from me.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I’ve been reluctant to talk about my cars other than the daily driver fleet.”

            It’s your call, whatever eases your mind.

            The Model S (and most Teslas in general) do get good range. Hopefully that trait will trickle down to other brands and more affordable BEVs soon.

  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    It reminds me of a car from an 80s or 90s sci-fi movie where they took an existing car and added body panels to make it look “futuristic”.

    I dig it.

  • avatar

    “Owning one is going to be a new experience and lifestyle that only the Ioniq brand can provide.”

    That is exactly what I try to avoid.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I could use one as a commuter to work but the charge times are still in need of major improvement. I know 18 minutes to 80% charge, but that mean my range is now 215 miles. Last Sunday I had to make an emergency run to pick up a server and the total distance was 412 miles. I took the minivan and when I got back home I still has 90 miles range left. With an EV it would have required at least one stop to top off the charge. Even with a Tesla with 320 miles range at 75. At least that corridor had charge stations.

    On a road trip, that Tesla would be more cramped as it is not a minivan. I also would have to limit my range to 256 miles (at 75mph on the interstate) charging to 80% and making more stops, or spend 40-50 minutes to get to 100%.

    I could not find any info on 100% charge on the Ioniq on a fast charger.

    For work my next car could be electric as it doesn’t need the room of a minivan and doesn’t need the range and “refuel” times of an ICE vehicle. But, my current sedan is staying with us for a while so I can’t justify an EV just yet.

    Just for the record, I have been looking to buy an EV since the Roadster came out, but so far have not been able to justify one because of either affordability or range. Those have both improved a lot in the last few years so in 5 or 6 years when the current sedan gets passed along I may have an EV in the garage.

  • avatar
    v8fairy

    “Obsidian Black Monotone, Dark Pebble Gray/Dove Gray, and Dark Teal/Dove Gray are the interior color choices.”

    What, no bordello red deep buttoned crushed velvet?

    That would get me into an EV tommorrow if it were available

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Looks cool, like KIA built a Golf GTi

  • avatar
    Jeff_M

    The future of EV’s is exciting to say the least. The future of the electric grid, not so much. Until I’m more confident that the grid can handle this infusion of EV’s and home heat pumps, I’ll stick with a gas car.

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