By on December 1, 2021

2022 Toyota Tundra

Thanks to Toyota’s glacier-like design cycle, a new Tundra is something most of us will experience only a few times in our adult lives. How long was the last generation around? Well, George W. Bush still had nearly three more years in the White House when the XK50 Tundra was unveiled at the Chicago Auto Show in February 2006. Yeah, it’s been a minute.

All that changed when the curtain dropped on the ’22 Tundra earlier this year. While the mighty and burly TRD Pro has gotten a lot of the press (and most of the promotional photos), there are actually about half a dozen trims on offer, some of which can be layered with options and packages.

We’ll settle on the SR5 for now, a decision made easy once one learns that’s the last stop for a Double Cab body configuration. Everything over and above this $40,755 pickup is available only with the enormous CrewMax cabin. This is fine for interior space but eats into bed space unless one pops for the optional 6.5-ft bed which stretches the Tundra’s total length to unfriendly dimensions. Besides, your author prefers the visual proportions of an extended cab and 6.5-ft bed, a combination that has decent space inside plus a cargo box that’s genuinely useful. Freakazoids can spec the Double Cab with an 8.1-ft box if they wish to have a truck that looks like a cartoon. Four-wheel drive is non-negotiable, by the way.

2022 Toyota Tundra

SR5 trim is equipped with the non-hybrid powertrain, comprised of a 3.5L twin-turbo V6 good for 389 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. This puts it in good company with both the 5.0L V8 and 3.5L EcoBoost at Ford (400/410 and 400/500, respectively) and beats the tar out of the 5.3L boat anchor at General Motors. An automatic limited-slip diff is part of the deal on this Toyota truck.

SR5 trim levels get a smaller infotainment screen than top models but it somehow manages to fit decently in the same space as the vast 14-inch display. Gauges are analog compared to more expensive reconfigurable digital readouts but are perfectly serviceable. This writer has spent time in a pre-production TRD Pro and found it a comfortable space laden with over-the-top chunky controls and details. That bank of switches under the infotainment, for example, has a rubberized coating. While this SR5 lacks the snazzy features of that TRD Pro, the basics are still present.

There is a quartet of option packages on the SR5. They range from a $1,560 Convenience Package which adds items like front/rear park assists and a 32-gallon fuel tank to a spendy TRD Off-Road Premium Package for $9,245. The latter adds off-road gear like all-terrain tires and Bilstein shock – plus jumbotron infotainment and a heated wheel – but is not the full-fat TRD Pro model we’ve all seen in marketing images for this thing. In other words, it doesn’t have the light bar grille or beefy undercarriage protection of the Pro.

2022 Toyota Tundra

In fact, if you’re planning to pop for the TRD Off-Road Package, you’re better off starting with a Limited trim rather than the SR5. While there is an approximately $6,000 difference between the two, that package is only (“only”) $5,510 yet it brings all the same off-road gear plus a JBL audio system and a power moonroof. With that level of equipment, we think it could even be considered on par with the SR5.

Outside that, there’s a case to be made for a four-wheel-drive Tundra SR5 with the big fuel tank. That truck will sticker at $45,315, leaving over 10 grand for aftermarket off-road goodies. Just make sure to get the Double Cab, okay?

Please note the prices listed here are in American dollars and currently accurate for base prices exclusive of any fees, taxes, or rebates. Your dealer may (and should) sell for less (obscene market conditions notwithstanding). Keep your foot down, bone up on available rebates, and bargain hard.

[Images: Toyota]

Become a TTAC insider. Get the latest news, features, TTAC takes, and everything else that gets to the truth about cars first by subscribing to our newsletter.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

44 Comments on “The Right Spec: 2022 Toyota Tundra...”


  • avatar
    no cvt

    What’s the back seat like in this cab? I’d like a crew cab truck but don’t think it will fit in the garage.

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      think about comparable legroom to a mid-sized crew cab truck with a few extra inches of headroom and shoulder room.
      Honestly an ext cab with a 6.5′ bed is the same size as a CC with short bed. Same wheelbase and all

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Aren’t the crew cabs and the extended cabs the same overall length? You get more can with one and more bed with the other, but I don’t think they are substantially different with respect to overall length though I am basing this on the domestics…not sure on the Toyotas.

      Either way, that truck in the picture makes a new Silverado look nice.

  • avatar

    Old school. When Toyota is going to unveil electric truck, Cybertruck/Rivian killer? I know, I know, it is a rhetoric question but I’m just trying to increase the click rate, I would even click like button if there was one.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Unfortunately for Toyota, the right spec is usually sitting on a Ford, Chevy, or Ram lot.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      Lou-

      I can tell you there isn’t one feature or any specifications (payload, towing) that can’t be found the the Big Three. Toyota has done nothing with this “new truck” that hasn’t already been done. This truck will be out of date sooner than the last model.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      “Unfortunately for Toyota, the right spec is usually sitting on a Ford, Chevy, or Ram lot”

      The Toyota will still be running and not rusted out in 10 years.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        My thoughts exactly. One feature that can’t be found in the Big Three? Reliability and resale.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Where would the Tundra be without wives tales?

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            You mean like the million mile Tundra? That “wives tale”?

            https://www.motortrend.com/features/million-mile-tundra-the-tear-down/

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That truck really did have God’s Own Engine.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            That’s a good one! The whole thing is an ad by Toyota, get real.

            The article was authored by Tim Esterdahl that happens to have a fantasy fanboy blog called Tundraheadquarters, maybe you’ve heard of it?

            The truck was driven by a Toyota engineer for all of those miles apparently, to the tune of over 100,000 miles a year.

            Is that even possible? The article raves about how door latches held up going cross country repeatedly. It’s a silly article for sure.

            Thing is all, yes all fullsize pickups are million mile trucks with the right care and how they’re used. I bought my new ’05 F-150 because of its million mile potential. And always get the V8 when possible.

            It has nowhere near that many miles and guess what? I don’t need a million miles and don’t want it. I may not live that long anyway!

            I’ve been literally trying to kill it from day one, so I can go get a new one. Yes 50K mile oil changes is just the start of the abuse. Mostly mountain and city driving/towing too.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            MotorTrend is the biggest trash shill outfit in the automotive media.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Their vehicles are middle of the road. Value, reliability, resale.

            It’s “marketing” where Toyota really excels. Remember the Tundra towing The Space Shuttle? Wives somewhere are talking about that right now.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            “Their vehicles are middle of the road. Value, reliability, resale.”

            Uber drivers and Cabbies aren’t all that wrong. Nor are Aussies hotlapping the outback pulling tons of beer.

            Their cars are prized in every weird backwater on earth, for being well above average in reliability. While that doesn’t directly translate to a brand new Tundra stuffed with a Turbo engine most of the engineers and workers would rather not spec were it not for rather contrived “CO2” and “consumption” tests, it does indicate where their priorities are. And that their processes are sound.

            A new model every two decades, is not really indicative of a sales/marketing department forcing issues…

            It also doesn’t hurt that their president actually knows something. Like how to drive. In a world where executives aren’t supposed to know anything at all other than how to regurgitate mindless pap, to boot.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @JD-Shifty – They aren’t vastly superior to domestic trucks. My 2010 F150 is still going strong. It’s durability ratings are on par with the Tundra. I’ve had less issues than people I know with Toyota’s.

      • 0 avatar
        eng_alvarado90

        “The Toyota will still be running and not rusted out in 10 years.”
        I wouldn’t take that for granted on a brand new truck with an unproved powertrain.
        Also, since when Toyota has been known to be more rust resistant than the competition? That’s a good one…

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Toyota Tundra sales are in for rude awakening when the EV trucks are in full swing. With no HD for 5th wheel towing their resources for the Tundra will just be absorbed by shared platform Tacoma as they won’t be able to Mai tain 100,000 annual sales to justify it.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I certainly hope the fuel economy improves over the last model. My last rental out of Austin Airport was a Tundra crew cab, 2WD, but with bigger offroadt looking wheels and tires. I got in the day of the F1 race and needed something large so that was it. It got 13 MPG.

    • 0 avatar
      MUSASHI66

      We got 19.4 miles to the gallon driving back from Southwest Colorado to Denver, with 4 adults, one puppy, and the trunk full of gear for a week out of town.

      Bone stock 2018 Tundra TRD Sport, 20″ OEM wheels and tires.

      My dad averages 18mpg. That is pretty good for a giant truck with 5.7L V8 designed when W was the president.

      • 0 avatar
        MUSASHI66

        Bed, not trunk. We did have one upgrade – folding tonneau cover.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Amazing. Anything’s possible but my best ever was 15.7 MPG, 4.6 V8, stock tires, 3.55 gears F-150. All Tundras until now force a 4.10 gear so it’s not common.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          On 2 separate 500 mile family trips with my 2010 F150 Supercrew 6.5 box 4×4 with 5.4 on stock tires, 3.55 gears. I averaged 20.4 mpg (US gallons) at 63 mph (100 kph speed limit). Currently on 10 ply tires I will get the 18 mpg (US gallon) rated mpg.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            So it doesn’t help to go 80 to 90 MPH? Then my mileage is better than I thought. It’s beautiful but I just don’t want to spend all week in the southwest desert.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    Wow, that schnozz is scary ugly. The whole thing is. It makes the Silverado look very good. How is that even possible?

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I’m hoping the aftermarket steps up with a grille and bumper combination that makes these look normal. The grille goes down too far, and there’s no protruding bumper – the front end must be as fragile as glass. You wouldn’t want to accidentally bump something, because it could get expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        The only really improved grill/front end I’ve seen lately is a guy in Michigan who took a Lexus RC-F and modded the grill by adding a horizontal body colored bar. What an improvement. Problem with aftermarket grills is the ones that actually fit out of the box are majorly expensive. Even a cheapish aluminum one for a Chevy Silverado a friend bought years ago after a minor wreck (His son hit the back of his girlfriend’s car at a stoplight) wasn’t all that cheap, and it had to be “adjusted” with a drill to get it to fit. Then it had to be messed with some more to stop buzzing at any kind of speed. He should have just looked at local junkyards for a stock one, but he didn’t like the factory grill much anyway.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    “All that changed when the curtain dropped on the ’22 Tundra earlier this year.”

    I think your metaphors got mixed there. In theater, when the curtain drops, that means the act is over. In this case, Toyota raised the curtain on the ’22 earlier this year. You might say it dropped the curtain on the ’21.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Seems like they’re not selling some models yet, at least in my region. I can’t configure the hybrid powertrain (which I definitely would want) or TRD Pro (which I wouldn’t).

    Just based on what I read online, I’d take a Limited crew cab, shorty bed with the hybrid powertrain, 4×4, and all available interior options.

    • 0 avatar
      MUSASHI66

      Neither hybrid nor Pro will be available until next year some time. No actual date has been confirmed.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      While there could be some issues with getting the hybrid system through certification or whatever, the lack of the TRD Pro from launch makes it seem like Toyota doesn’t have a clue. In the truck world you should always go all in on top trims at launch because most of the people who have to be the first one on the block with the latest and greatest truck want to have the latest and greatest version.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    A truck with no V8 option is dead to me.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The double/extra/super cab and 6.5′ bed is the Goldilocks. But I gotta have the clamshell/suicide doors, non negotiable.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The right spec is over at the Ram or Ford dealer, where you can find trucks that aren’t ridiculously ugly.

  • avatar
    Crosley

    I love Toyota, but why can’t they figure out styling?

    Something like F-150 or Silverado/Denali are SO much better looking.

    I think I prefer the old Tundra, even if it was really long in the tooth and from the mid-aughts.

    • 0 avatar
      MUSASHI66

      I’d be fine if you just said F150 or Denali, but throwing the Silverado in there – a truck so ugly and so universally hated for the looks that Chevy had to do an emergency face lift – is a bit silly.

      • 0 avatar
        Crosley

        I actually like the 2022 Silverado from an aesthetic standpoint. I trust GM quality as far as I can throw it, but it’s an attractive vehicle with the right grill.

        This Toyota is ugly ( and I prefer Toyota products)

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The monochromatic grill/trim with color-key and dark metallic body makes it acceptable from 100 yards and 100 MPH. Clearly they choose that scheme for the press photos, as features don’t show well. A choice of satin paints would help also.

  • avatar
    Funky D

    Since there is no V8 option, the Right Spec doesn’t exist for this truck.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    You heard them. It doesn’t matter, white noise, the Toyota emblem is the only spec the blind faithful concerned themselves with.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Kruser: We had a Colt wagon it was… meh. But, perhaps it didn’t have a chance in comparison to the other...
  • Bike: You throw a lot of “facts” around old mate.
  • Bike: You throw a lot of “facts” around old mate.
  • dal20402: “Wages for most white collar jobs have been the same” This is emphatically not true in either...
  • slavuta: I feel he will not get to enjoy his new $$

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber