By on September 13, 2021

Cadillac’s instance that it be the first brand owned by General Motors to go entirely electric has resulted in a shrinking U.S. dealership network, though perhaps a healthier bottom line for GM in the long run. It may also foreshadow the trajectory of other brands committed themselves to EVs and give us a sense of what the dealer landscape might look like in a decade or two.

Over the last few years, American luxury brands have been attempting to grow in select markets they believe will bring in new, affluent customers by building experience centers that mimic high-end airport lounges. Cadillac even briefly moved its base of operations to New York City as a way to gain distance from its rustbelt background and ingratiate itself into high society. More recently, Lincoln introduced a Central Park-themed Navigator as both have been trying to lay down roots in parts of California after ceding a large share of the market to the competition decades earlier. But GM’s insistence that Cadillac become an all-electric brand (with Lincoln also targeting a glut of EV sales by 2026) seems as though it could create complications, even if the end result is a major victory. 

According to Automotive News, Cadillac is losing stores in rural regions. Owners are concerned that the swift shift toward EVs won’t work for a customer base that has to cover more ground on a daily basis and lack access to robust charging networks. But the company’s strategy is apparently working for the metropolitan hubs it’s been focusing on.

From AN:

Cadillac is entering new luxury markets and reestablishing itself in crucial areas it had ceded to rivals — including Beverly Hills, Calif., where it hadn’t been since the 1980s, and its former home base of Manhattan, N.Y., where its only store closed last year. Some established Cadillac dealers are scooping up additional stores, while a few dealers are getting involved with the brand for the first time.

At least eight dealership groups have acquired Cadillac stores this year. Recent deals include acquisitions by Frank Kent Motor Co. and Ken Garff Automotive Group in Texas and by Ciocca Dealerships in Atlantic City, N.J. The purchases show confidence in Cadillac as it implements a plan to sell only electric vehicles by the end of the decade, even with the potential for low volumes to start.

“These are all 20-year decisions,” Mahmoud Samara, vice president of Cadillac North America, told Automotive News. “It is very satisfying to know that you have partners [who] can see 20, 30 years down the road, and they’re putting their money where their mouths are. They’re fully invested into the brand, invested into Cadillac.”

But thinking 20 years down the line ourselves makes us wonder what the dealership landscape will ultimately look like. The presumption is that EVs will be at least as capable as internal-combustion vehicles by 2040 and it’s one we’re inclined to agree with — provided the necessary action is taken to expand charging infrastructures and the additional strain to be placed on power grids. But that may also result in an interim period where electrics dominate urban landscapes as gas or diesel models remain king in rural environments. Brands pursuing universal electrification would effectively be splitting the market.

Then there are the associated costs with upgrading dealerships to adhere to the new EV strategy. General Motors is requiring retailers that wish to stay with the brand to invest an average of $200,000 on chargers, tooling, and staff training for electric vehicles — all of which are absolutely necessary if they’re to service and sell EVs.

This isn’t new, Cadillac’s previous dealer strategy (Project Pinnacle) required loads of mandatory investments and was broadly unpopular among auto dealers. A lot of owners simply allowed themselves to be bought out. This time around stores literally have to invest if they’ve any hope of selling or servicing future vehicle lineups, however, with Automotive News reporting around 150 Cadillac dealers having accepted buyouts last fall. Prices were said to average between $300,000 and more than $500,000.

While that makes it sound like the current strategy is on track to be another debacle, Cadillac remains committed to retaking ground in metropolitan hubs and believes the market is coming around to electric cars. The same goes for dealers, some of whom are investing millions to retake facilities that went under (or allowed themselves to be bought out) over the last few years.

“The timing worked out really well for me because I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going,” said Jimmy Ellis, president of Jim Ellis Automotive Group in Atlanta.

His group already sold Chevy, Buick, and GMC products. But he said he only wanted to grab onto Cadillac after it had made a formal commitment to swap to EVs and introduced the new Lyriq crossover. He’s hardly alone in holding that opinion but there are reasons to be wary, as electric adoption remains in its infancy. Then again, if one could get in on the ground floor and be the only game in town as interest begins to swell, that would provide a decided sales advantage.

“Dealers are entrepreneurs, and they’re risk takers,” said Mark Johnson, president of buy-sell firm MD Johnson Inc. “For the majority of them, the risk has really worked out.”

We’ll have to see if these successful acquisitions translate into healthy sales. But those throwing their hat into the ring with Cadillac’s new strategy appear overwhelmingly optimistic as the doubters are forced to abandon ship.

[Image: Lerner Vadim/Shutterstock]

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63 Comments on “Report: Cadillac’s EV Ambitions Creating Dealer Shakeup...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    Cadillac’s *insistence?*

  • avatar
    jmo2

    I think the bigger issue is that electric motors as a technology are inherently much more reliable and require far less maintenance than ICE. These days dealers don’t make money selling new cars they make money on routine maintenance and warranty work. And used cars. Their business model will need to change.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      This. Its harder to rip off customers with muffler bearing adjustments and blinker fluid top offs when the car has so few confusing greasy bits to service.

      Plus I think this downsizing of Caddy dealers is, in fact the desired effect GM wants.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Plus I think this downsizing of Caddy dealers is, in fact the desired effect GM wants.”

        Bingo. Should have done it when they had the chance in 2009/10. Cadillac knows its sales will only continue to falter, and its more in their favor to build product to accommodate far few dealers than then 933 they still had around 2016. ATS was build as a lease volume POS for that amount of dealers, it explains the cost cutting and rush to get it out there. If Cadillac wasn’t trying to satisfy nearly a 1,000 businesses it could have taken more time to develop the right product.

        However their dealer cull is being done for the wrong reasons IMO. They know the future EV market won’t even be close to ICE sales, so they want to grab larger market share in a smaller market. I doubt it will work, Cadillac would be better as a contrarian.

    • 0 avatar

      This is VERY common thinking but the reality doesn’t back it up. Historically speaking, a majority of ICE customers don’t go back to their selling dealer after their warranty expires, but with EVs and hybrids the numbers are much higher, in the 70-90% range, depending on who you believe. That volume is going to keep them in business.

    • 0 avatar
      carcomment

      Another nonsense myth. Car dealers make LOTS of money on new cars. They just make more in some other parts of their business. I never understand why people repeat erroneous statements as truth. Dealers want you to believe that don’t make money on new cars. Here’s the rub- car dealers make lots of money on everything they do or the planet’s greatest entrepreneurs wouldn’t do it. Full stop.

  • avatar
    Greg Hamilton

    As one of the B&B pointed out to me Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries seem to have a very real future. This video illustrates the history of LFP batteries and how they came to be made almost exclusively in China, and where they can now be found in some of Tesla’s Standard Range model 3s.

    “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_GtSA4Ig9s”

    An excellent video of which I have no affiliation.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Yes, that’s pretty much the only Model 3 you can actually get *now*, vs later (January), unless you spring for the Performance version.

      It does look promising, but I haven’t seen any data on just how worse the cold weather performance is supposed to be.

      Having no cobalt is a plus.

      I would guess Tesla is considering building these domestically.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries are good batteries.

      The only reason they’re not more common is that they’re heavy and expensive.

      They’re durable, long lasting (high cycle counts), and safe (fire resistant).

      The reason we don’t see them as much in cars in the American market is our range requirements: other lithium chemistries carry more energy for the same weight. But, if you only need a medium-range EV (in a chassis with a long range option), LiFePO4s are a great choice for their longevity and safety.

      Good stuff!

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @luke42: LiFePO4’s are actually getting cheap. We should seem them on Teslas soon as well. I’m even seeing them pop up on Amazon. Batteries are a fast moving technology. Also, the battery companies that are the best at getting real advances to the market stay under the radar until the last minute. Like Sila with their silicon anode. Just announced they are not only going into mass production, but they already have a first customer. It’s going to be shipping in a fitness product.

        https://www.whoop.com/thelocker/introducing-4-0-whoop-body-any-wear-technology/

        LiFiPO4 on Amazon:
        https://www.amazon.com/s?k=lifepo4&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

        We didn’t hear about CATL’s Sodium-Ion cells going into mass production until last minute either. There have been some density breakthroughs in sodium-ion recently (janus graphene), but those breakthroughs haven’t made it into production yet. I really like CATLs idea of making combination sodium-ion/lithium-ion packs. I’d really like to see a manufacturer use those packs. You get the best of both worlds.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Cadillac should shrink itself into nothing and by becoming all EV that will happen sooner than expected

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Cadillac was chasing BMW, when they should have been positioning themselves as a budget alternative to Tesla.

      The only thing Cadillac brings to the table is 20th century nostalgia, and I don’t miss those bad old days.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Standard of the World to budget alternative to Tesla. Progress!

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @Luke:

        I think Cadillac’s problem was that their “we sell BMW sedan alternatives” push should have come around 2000 or so, when buyers still cared about sedans. Instead, they were trying to pass off the Catera as a BMW alternative, and putting Euro lipstick on FWD luxobarges. Not surprisingly, that flopped.

        But in typical GM fashion, they decided to bring out some actually competitive sedans in the late 2000s/early 2010s, right when buyers decided they couldn’t get enough crossovers.

  • avatar

    head for the exit now and beat the traffic. this brand is dead.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      As much as it pains me to say it, I think it’s dead too. And I’ll mark the date of death as the introduction dates of the XT4 and XT6. In their own way, these bland, Chevy-clone cars are just as awful as a Cimarron or Catera.

      Might as well shrink and rebrand as an electric marque.

      • 0 avatar

        I put the date of death much further back, at the launch of the alphanumeric naming convention. As soon as a DeVille became a DTC, it was just a matter of time (the success of the fancy Chevy SUVs just kicked the can down the road for a few decades).

        • 0 avatar
          Matt Posky

          The alphanumeric stuff is also right around the time when I started noticing Cadillacs weren’t any more comfortable to ride around in than mainstream SUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “As soon as a DeVille became a DTC”

          DTS. So about mid 00s… sounds about right.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I don’t really buy into the “just give cars real names versus alphanumeric designations and it’s all good” argument. Ask Lincoln – it gave the Continental one of the greatest model names of all time, and it was a total bomb.

          It’s all about the product. I’d argue the Continental bombed because a) it’s not a CUV, and b) it was a glorified Fusion and wasn’t all that great.

          Cadillac’s big sedan push came in the late aughts/early 2010s, right as the lux market went gonzo for CUVs and electrics, and they had serious product flaws – cheap-ish interiors, Chevy engines, and CUE, which was awful.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Cadillac’s big sedan push came in the late aughts/early 2010s, right as the lux market went gonzo for CUVs and electrics”

            The market didn’t go gonzo for electrics, at any point but especially late 00s/early 10s.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            Tesla Model S was introduced in 2012.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Freed

            3100 units in 2013 does not “gonzo” make. Hype did not lead to sales of it, Leaf, or Volt.

            “We produced over 2,750 vehicles during the quarter and more than 3,100 vehicles during the full year, while maintaining our stringent quality standards.”

            https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1318605/
            000119312513067177/d462441dex991.htm

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      We CTS-V owners are a ferociously loyal bunch!

    • 0 avatar
      Shockrave Flash Has Crashed

      The senior executives don’t want to drive Chevys, Cadillac will always be around.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “General Motors is requiring retailers that wish to stay with the brand to invest an average of $200,000 on chargers, tooling, and staff training for electric vehicles”

    I was going to challenge that number, but it may be right.

    The real bugaboo is that the EV service revenue model can’t be great. Chargers aren’t very costly, but tooling and training to fully service an EV could be pricey. Unfortunately, dealers and techs may seldom use it.

    For example, how often will a dealer remove a battery pack? I guess if you’re crushed by a recall (Bolt, Kona), then it matters more, but normally you’d never do it – ever. Maybe for crash repair, but that might be outsourced to a body shop anyway.

    But some of these ‘costs’ may be straw men. For instance, every new model has some set of unique tools required to service it efficiently. Blaming EVs for normal training and tooling costs that are incurred every year could be happening here.

    The mystique around EV service needs to be debunked. I’ve serviced my own EVs for brakes, wipers, cabin air filters, etc. The local Monro Muffler gets my business for tire installation, alignments, and safety inspections, an independent body shop got my business for crash repair, and Safelite got my business for a windshield replacement.

    The Hyundai dealer got nothing – but then again, I never visit a dealer except for recall work.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      Some good points in general. Yes, dealers DO make money on new cars. But they make a lot, maybe more, in the used car dept. And they make a lot, maybe more, with service–warranty (though not as much as in the past) and paying customers of newer cars, on maintenance and repair.

      Less maintenance on EVs. Repairs make people angry and come later in a car’s life. Once the warranty expires, many people don’t use dealers. A good repair shop actually is likely to do a better job, in addition to costing less.

      So, when the transmission on a to 15-year old car fails, does one go to the dealer to get it replaced? Or an independent mechanic?

      The battery will be an expensive replacement. If people want to keep the vehicle, many of those won’t be done by the dealer.

      Actually, as more people discover that batteries last less than they anticipated, and see the cost, good chance they will want to return to ICE.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Cadillac has nowhere to go but up, and I don’t say that to be optimistic. Aside from the Escalade, or maybe a CT-5 Blackwing (which they’re going to make about 18 of), there’s nothing there that counts as even marginally relevant. Might as well go electric.

  • avatar
    Socrates77

    The only reason they’re still on businesses is because they fooled old Fuddy-duddys who don’t know what a real luxury car looks like. Bit once the baby boomers are gone Cadillac will officially end. The new generation aren’t dumb to buy a car just because is an American brand, they know GM makes most of their cars on other countries. Unlike baby boomers who are overpaying for a buick envision and don’t realize that is made in china, but in their minds they’re buying American. RIP GM

    • 0 avatar

      “The new generation aren’t dumb”

      Fact checker: You statement is utterly wrong. It is well established that at least for the last 3000 years of human history in China, Europe, North Africa and Middle East every succeeding generation of human species is dumber than preceding one. And latest data shows that rise of dumbness took exponential character in late 20th – early 21st centuries in accordance with the theory of approaching Singularity. Humans who will cross the Singularity will be absolutely dumb, even in East Asia.

      So first, Boomers did not like and did not drive Cadillac. As far as we know from historic records aspired to own VWs including van and motorbikes in accordance with ideals and slogans of Cultural Revolution, Flower Power and Hippie movement.

      P.S Hippie, also spelled hippy, member, during the 1960s and 1970s, of a countercultural movement that rejected the mores of mainstream American life. The movement originated on college campuses in the United States, although it spread to other countries, including Canada and Britain.

    • 0 avatar
      olddavid

      …..said the human that has been convinced to buy water and hamburgers with no beef.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Chalk up another one for the “if you can’t compete selling real cars to people paying with their money”, just make up some hype about all the great things you are going to sell in the future, once government forces other people to pay for them…

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      That government force – if it comes to that – will apply pretty equally to all brands, so Cadillac still ends up losing.

      Even with Mr Biden’s favor toward union-built EVs, the Federal incentives won’t sway enough buyers their way to ensure viability.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      @Stuki:

      Not sure, but were you one of the folks who was saying “when the tax incentives run out for Tesla, they’re toast”?

      Yeah, whatever.

      Tax incentives don’t sell cars. Cars sell cars. If they suck, the government can give away as much tax credits as it wants and no one will buy them.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “Not sure, but were you one of the folks who was saying “when the tax incentives run out for Tesla, they’re toast”?”

        Nope.

        Tesla is in the business of selling paper to privileged illiterates on Fed Welfare. The occasional “car” is, at most, a marketing expense to keep the illusion alive. As long as central banks and governments keep robbing productive people in order to hand the loot to useful idiot “investors” by the trillions, Tesla, and all the rest of their ilk, will be a-ok. The countries whose productive people and organizations have to be robbed to make it so, not so much.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Escalade putting up record sales
    Crossover sales on the rise
    CT4 & CT5 V Blackwings kicking the sht. out of everything on the track.
    The Lyriq will put Cadillac a quantum leap ahead of everyone else in style, range and self driving tech.
    With 2 more electric crossovers, an EV Escalade and the ultra luxurious Celestiq on the way, Cadillac will soon be in a league of its own among luxury brands.
    The Germans should stick to making beer & sausage.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Escalade putting up record sales
    Crossover sales on the rise
    CT4 & CT5 V Blackwings kicking the sht. out of everything on the track.
    The Lyriq will put Cadillac a quantum leap ahead of everyone else in style, range and self driving tech.
    With 2 more electric crossovers, an EV Escalade and the ultra luxurious Celestiq on the way, Cadillac will soon be in a league of its own among luxury brands.
    The Germans should stick to making beer & sausage.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Escalade putting up record sales
    Crossover sales on the rise
    CT4 & CT5 V Blackwings kicking the sht. out of everything on the track.
    The Lyriq will put Cadillac a quantum leap ahead of everyone else in style, range and self driving tech.
    With 2 more electric crossovers, an EV Escalade and the ultra luxurious Celestiq on the way, Cadillac will soon be in a league of its own among luxury brands.
    The Germans should stick to making beer & sausage.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “CT4 & CT5 V Blackwings kicking the sht. out of everything on the track.”

      C8s, Boxsters, Caymans, and Plaids??

      “The Lyriq will put Cadillac a quantum leap ahead of everyone else in style, range and self driving tech.”

      I don’t know about the front and rear styling. That lighted animated grill is ugly and the tackiest thing I’ve ever seen attached to the front of a car. Maybe it will look better in person.

      “The Germans should stick to making beer & sausage.”

      GM at one time made furnaces. Maybe they should have gone back to that. The Bolt debacle is destroying peoples confidence in GM. It’s going to take time to recover from that reputation. People aren’t going to buy a car that they’re afraid to park in an attached garage. I’m a fan of the Bolt. I really like the car. But, I’m not sure I’d trust any car with an LG battery right now. A high mileage Bolt with a brand new replacement battery at a dirt cheap price would be a temptation for a daily driver around-town car, but you can bet I’d be shopping for some long charging cables. Ultium is geat technology, but given the Bolt debacle, I’d be worried about it.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        24 hours at Le Mans
        Tesla’s quickly run out of Charge
        No one can squeeze themselves into a Porsche Cayman Boxter minicar that long
        Corvette’s and Cadillacs go all night long, all night long.
        Lyriq front and Back – in between there is a luxury EV with SuperCruise and a 300 mile EV range

        LG batteries – Cadillac will use next generation Ultimum.
        BTW most automotive companies use LG batteries.
        GM used to make furnaces – sounds like you’re not that good at making conversation at parties. Stick to making Sausage.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @peter gazis

          “24 hours at Le Mans”
          So, a single race.

          “No one can squeeze themselves into a Porsche Cayman Boxter minicar that long
          Corvette’s and Cadillacs go all night long, all night long.”

          I’m looking at the 2021 entry list, and I’m not seeing a single Cadillac. Plenty of Porsches. There are Corvettes, but don’t remember Corvettes being more spacious inside than a Cayman or Boxster or 911. Maybe you meant LeMons which is probably a good venue for cadillack. By the way, if you ever actually followed Le Mans, you’d realize they switch drivers and they do indeed need fuel since those cars run out of fuel quickly as well.

          “lyriq front and Back – in between there is a luxury EV with SuperCruise and a 300 mile EV range”

          Assuming people can deal with having the goofiest, tackiest front end ever put on a production car. Illuminated badge and grill with those stupid-looking triangular or whatever side vents or whatever they are.

          “BTW most automotive companies use LG batteries.”

          VW Group, Ford, & GM? Hyundai/KIA is dropping them. Who will be next? Tesla doesn’t use them and they account for a large volume of the EVs being produced.

          https://thedriven.io/2020/11/17/hyundai-turns-to-sk-innovation-batteries-instead-of-lg-chem-in-light-of-kona-ev-battery-fires/

          “LG batteries – Cadillac will use next generation Ultimum.”

          Wow, they don’t even have the first generation of Ultium out and they are already abandoning it? What was wrong with it? Oh, let me guess…

          “GM used to make furnaces – sounds like you’re not that good at making conversation at parties. Stick to making Sausage.”

          What does that have to do with conversations at parties? GM did make furnaces. They made heat by applying flames to a heat exchanger and they seem to still have a talent at making things that produce flames.

          As for conversations at parties – the latest thing for me at parties is that people have started to try to get for speaking engagements, so I must not be that bad. I also do a lot of confidential work and that can be difficult to steer around in conversations. Lot’s of people in the financial industry trying to get an edge. You have to be careful not to slip. It’s not fun. Don’t know what this has to do with Cadillac, but you brought it up. Oh, and I don’t make sausage. What a weird comment.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      @Peter:
      If not for the Escalade, Cadillac would have died a nasty death LONG ago. You know it.

      The crossover lineup sells because it’s crossovers. There is absolutely nothing “Cadillac” about any of them. You could just as easily put a Buick or Chevy badge on them.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        Before Escalade there was Fleetwood. Cadillac has always been the go to brand for big luxury vehicles. If the Escalade didn’t exist another large Cadillac would.
        The crossovers have Cadillac’s magnetic ride control. There’s nothing better for driving on road in wintery weather conditions.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “Cadillac has always been the go to brand for big luxury vehicles. ”

          For airport transportation companies maybe. For what people are actually purchasing, I see more Mercedes, Range Rover, BMW, and Lexus. If you see a Cadillac, it’s usually for an airport pickup. I wouldn’t consider Cadillac an actually luxury brand. They’re really a premium value mass production brand.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Escalade putting up record sales
    Crossover sales on the rise
    CT4 & CT5 V Blackwings kicking the sht. out of everything on the track.
    The Lyriq will put Cadillac a quantum leap ahead of everyone else in style, range and self driving tech.
    With 2 more electric crossovers, an EV Escalade and the ultra luxurious Celestiq on the way, Cadillac will soon be in a league of its own among luxury brands.
    The Germans should stick to making beer & sausage.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    ““I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going,” said Jimmy Ellis, president of Jim Ellis Automotive Group in Atlanta.”

    1980: “I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going”

    1990: “I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going”

    2000: “I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going”

    2010: “I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going”

    2021: “I can see the renaissance of the brand and the direction that they’re going”

    Same delusion for 40 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Cadillac was the world’s best selling luxury br 50 years. Until Lincoln passed it up in 1993

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Obvious shill is obvious. All downhill since 1985:

        1985 298,762
        1990 258,168
        2000 189,154
        2010 146,925
        2020 129,495

        https://carsalesbase.com/us-cadillac/

        The marque who brought us such successes as:

        V-4-6-8
        HT4100
        Cimmaron
        Downsized E-body
        Northstar
        Catera
        ATS
        ELR

        Honorable mentions: Allanté, XLR, CTS Coupe, SRX Gen 1

  • avatar
    craiger

    Phoning it in?

    “Cadillac’s instance [insistence] that it be the first brand owned by General Motors to go entirely electric has resulted in a shrinking U.S. dealership network, though perhaps a healthier bottom line for GM in the long run. It may also foreshadow the trajectory of other brands committed [committing] themselves to EVs and give us a sense of what the dealer landscape might look like in a decade or two.”

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Cadillac might survive because like Buick it is selling well in China. As for EVs that might be the only thing that saves Cadillac since most of their ICE vehicles are rebadged Chevys. Continue to shrink the dealers and vehicles like the Lyriq could be enough to keep Cadillac in business. Cadillac is no longer the Standard of the World but carving out a niche in the EV luxury market might be enough.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    Pretty funny Cadilac won’t have an AWD EV until 2023/2024. All the hype of the Lyric and its not even awd like the competition that is already out. A brand that should have went away in Bankruptcy, all rebadged, marked up Chevy junk.

  • avatar

    Cadillac sucks canal water. jump while you can. it’s a dead brand.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Cadillac will be alright they go all EVs and don’t get too greedy and price their EVs higher than Mercedes and BMW. The Lyriq is not a bad looking vehicle and if they price it just below Tesla and the luxury competition they might succeed. Cadillac also needs to up the quality of their interiors.

  • avatar

    Cadillac is the last remnant of the classic Detroit churn, new car every 3 years. While most of the world has moved on/can’t afford/it’s really wasteful to trade every 3, this allows Cadillac to make cars from the GM parts bin, warranty the losers, and they rinse and repeat every 3. Used Cadillac values tell the real story but from a dealer perspective it’s still 1967. These buyers are dying off, but twas ever thus for the Standard of the Alleyway.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @speedlaw–The typical Cadillac buyer just like the Lincoln buyer died off 20 years ago or more. The Greatest Generation were the last big market for Cadillac. I am almost 70 and I have never owned a Cadillac and probably will never own one (I can afford almost any luxury vehicle) and I keep my vehicles an average of 12 years. Most baby boomers are not Cadillac buyers even those who could easily afford a Cadillac. Cadillac for the past 20 years has been chasing BMW but that has not worked out that well for Cadillac so now suvs and crossovers have been the main products which is true for Buick. Going EV might be the last hope for Cadillac to survive long term and even then Cadillac will never sell in the volume of its heydays but Cadillac has a chance to have a profitable niche if it does it right. Cadillac has a chance with the Lyriq if it doesn’t get too much above the $59.999 base price which will make it competitive with Tesla’s pricier vehicles and if Cadillac ups their interior quality.

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  • rudiger: Well, there was the Fiero. I’m not sure if the Vega caught fire; it was more of an overheating issue...
  • Lou_BC: Isn’t Nissan discontinuing the Titan?
  • Lou_BC: Birth control is an important issue but sell that to any big religion. They’d prefer to see “end...
  • dal20402: The problem is that they catch fire at different times and places. ICEs probably present more overall fire...

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