Ford 'Mustang' Mach-E Passes Police Assessment

Matt Posky
by Matt Posky

Ford Motor Co. has announced that the Mustang Mach-E it sent off to tackle the Michigan State Police 2022 model year evaluation has passed, which is likely to bode well for the possibility of future fleet sales. But let’s not put the cart before the proverbial horse just yet. While Ford has had a long and fruitful history furnishing quality police vehicles, it has also offered up models that later required your author to do some research to figure out what “pursuit-rated” actually means.

The Mach-E passing the MSP’s gauntlet could simply mean that it didn’t endure a catastrophic failure while zipping around Grattan Raceway and we’re a little over a month away from getting comparative metrics for all vehicles tested earlier this month. However, Ford wanted to get out ahead of the test results so it can continue hyping the EV.

From Ford:

The Ford Pro all-electric police pilot vehicle based on the 2021 Mustang Mach-E SUV just became the first all-electric vehicle to pass the rigorous Michigan State Police 2022 model year evaluation. Testing included acceleration, top speed, braking and high-speed pursuit, as well as emergency response handling characteristics. Michigan State Police is one of two law enforcement agencies that annually test new model year police vehicles and publish the results for use by agencies nationwide.

“The fact that the Mustang Mach-E successfully stood up to the grueling Michigan State Police evaluation demonstrates that Ford can build electric vehicles that are capable, tough and reliable enough for even the most challenging jobs,” said Ted Cannis, CEO of Ford Pro. “We understand the needs of our commercial customers and are committed to unlocking new electrification opportunities for them.”

While the Michigan State Police test vehicle dynamics, we’re equally interested in how officers find the Mach-E’s ergonomics. Ease of use is something that’s meticulously evaluated during testing and the competition (most of which is comprised of large domestic sedans, SUVs, and pickups) has already achieved high marks in years past. If the Mach-E turns out to be harder to live with than a Dodge Charger, chances are most departments aren’t going to care about the fueling advantages of an all-electric vehicle.

Dependability will be another matter. Police have traditionally preferred vehicles that can endure routine abuse without putting up a fuss. While the testing at Grattan cannot mimic the abuses your average squad car might endure through its lifespan, it does represent a couple of days of habitual thrashing and is likely to give a sense of what the Ford can and cannot handle. We’ll know more in November, when the Michigan State Police 2022 model year evaluation is released in earnest.

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

Matt Posky
Matt Posky

A staunch consumer advocate tracking industry trends and regulation. Before joining TTAC, Matt spent a decade working for marketing and research firms based in NYC. Clients included several of the world’s largest automakers, global tire brands, and aftermarket part suppliers. Dissatisfied with the corporate world and resentful of having to wear suits everyday, he pivoted to writing about cars. Since then, that man has become an ardent supporter of the right-to-repair movement, been interviewed on the auto industry by national radio broadcasts, driven more rental cars than anyone ever should, participated in amateur rallying events, and received the requisite minimum training as sanctioned by the SCCA. Handy with a wrench, Matt grew up surrounded by Detroit auto workers and managed to get a pizza delivery job before he was legally eligible. He later found himself driving box trucks through Manhattan, guaranteeing future sympathy for actual truckers. He continues to conduct research pertaining to the automotive sector as an independent contractor and has since moved back to his native Michigan, closer to where the cars are born. A contrarian, Matt claims to prefer understeer — stating that front and all-wheel drive vehicles cater best to his driving style.

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  • EBFlex EBFlex on Sep 28, 2021

    This is amazing news. Ford successfully made a vehicle that can accelerate, stop, and turn. What an accomplishment. Now if only they could figure out how make windshields and roofs work.

  • Superdessucke Superdessucke on Sep 28, 2021

    Wonder if it was a ringer, like the Pontiacs that Jim Wangers used to supply to the automotive press...

    • Sgeffe Sgeffe on Sep 30, 2021

      And all the X-cars in 1980! Well, still GM! (Sorry, gm!)

  • V16 2025 VW GLI...or 2025 Honda Civic SI? Same target audience, similar price points. Both are rays of sun in the gray world of SUV'S.
  • FreedMike Said this before and I'll say it again: I'm not that exercised about this whole "pay for a subscription" thing, as long as the deal's reasonable. And here's how you make it reasonable: offer it a monthly charge. Let's say that adaptive headlights are a $500 option on this vehicle, and the subscription is $15 a month, or $540 over a three year lease. So you try the feature for a month, and if you like it, you keep it; if you don't, then you discontinue it, like a Netflix subscription. In any case, you didn't get charged $500 up front the feature. That's not a bad deal.In my case, let's say VW offers an over the air chip reflash that gives me another 25 hp. The total price of the upgrade is $1,000 (which is what a reflash would cost you in the aftermarket). If they offered me a one time monthly subscription for $50 to try it out, I'd take it. In other words, maybe the news isn't all bad.
  • 2ACL A good car, but - at least in this configuration -not one that should command a premium. Its qualities just aren't as enduring as those of Honda's contemporary sports cars. For better or worse, this is a formula they remain able to replicate.
  • Jalop1991 I just read that Tesla's profits are WAY down "as the electric vehicle company has faced both more EV competition from established automakers and a slowing of overall EV sales growth." This Cadillac wouldn't help Tesla at all, but the slowing market of EV sales overall means this should be a halo/boutique car. Regardless, yes, they should make it.
  • FreedMike It's just a damn shame that Alfa never conquered its' quality demons in time for the Giulia and Stelvio to hit the market - these are loaded with personality, and we need more product like that.
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