By on July 20, 2017

ford f-150 police responder

Ford recently began giving law enforcement agencies more options in terms of the type of automobiles they want to put into active duty. The company provided America’s preferred pursuit vehicle, the Crown Victoria, for years and has moved on to a broader fleet of sedans, SUVs, and pickups specifically equipped for police use. Earlier this year, Ford showcased the Police Responder Hybrid Sedan as part of its Greener Shade of Blue campaign — dubbing it the “first pursuit-rated hybrid police car.”

We condemned Ford for its bragging, mainly because Chevrolet already provided a hybrid police vehicle and there was no concrete evidence that the Police Responder Hybrid Sedan was actually pursuit-rated. Unfortunately, we may be forced to do that all over again with Ford’s new F-150 Police Responder pickup. It’s another new, likely welcome, entry into the automaker’s extensive law enforcement fleet that leaves us doubting the validity of the terminology used.

When enquiring about the Hybrid Sedan’s worthiness of being considered a pursuit vehicle, Lt. Michael McCarthy, from the Michigan State Police’s Precision Driving Unit, stated he wanted to reserve all formal judgements until after the car had undergone the department’s rigorous annual testing at Grattan Raceway.

ford f-150 police responder

As anyone with a sincere interest in squad cars will tell you, manufacturers (and practically every police department in North America) look to the MSP to provide useful benchmarks for the capabilities of vehicles outfitted for law enforcement.

“Ford has a Police Advisory Board which consists of approximately 25 members from police agencies around the nation and Canada,” Lt. McCarthy explained. “Many of the suggestions that have been made at these meetings have been incorporated into their police vehicles. The Board meets 2-4 times per year and puts the members in direct contact with the engineers making their vehicles.”

The Michigan State Police and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s also provide the purchasing specifications and testing criteria necessary to develop what they consider a pursuit-rated vehicle. While automakers can technically call the models whatever they want, it’s not unreasonable to assume the terms used by the manufacturer adhere to these targets. “Our purchasing spec says that [a pursuit vehicle] must accelerate from 0-60 mph in 9.0 seconds, 0-80 mph in 14.9 seconds, 0-100 mph in 24.6 seconds, and attain a top speed of 120 mph — minimum,” McCarthy told us.

While there is little doubt the F-150 Police Responder’s 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost can hit most of these guidelines, especially with 375 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque on tap, Ford indicates it is limited to 100 mph. However, the automaker is still calling the pickup “pursuit-rated.”

“Ford’s 2018 F-150 Police Responder is the perfect all-terrain law enforcement vehicle,” said Stephen Tyler, Ford’s police brand marketing manager, in a release. “Aside from its industry-first on-road pursuit capability, this purpose-built pickup can comfortably seat five, while providing capability in off-road patrol situations for officers in rural environments patrolled by sheriff’s departments, border patrol operations and the Department of Natural Resources.”

ford f-150 police responder

Even though this is more of a problem for Ford’s marketing department than its engineers, it does seem inappropriate to bestow a meaningful label upon the truck before it has proven itself deserving of it. Additionally, Ford typically calls its pursuit cars Interceptors — as is the case with the Taurus-based Police Interceptor Sedan and Explorer-based Police Interceptor Utility. Calling the F-150 a “Responder,” which Ford also did with the Hybrid Sedan, seems to indicate the company wasn’t willing to fully commit.

Fastidiousness aside, some departments are likely to be interested in the new pickup. General Motors offers the Silverado Special Service Vehicle but the F-150 should outperform it in terms of fuel economy, thanks to its comparatively smaller engine and 10-speed automatic.

ford f-150 police responder

Coming standard with the FX4 off-road package, the Ford pickup uses a part-time four-wheel-drive system with low-range transfer case and comes with a locking rear differential, skid plates, and model-specific shocks. As a police vehicle, the Responder is outfitted with the obligatory 240-amp alternator, column-mounted shifter, and steel-plated seat backs. It also has unique aluminum wheels, an anti-roll bar, and upgraded brakes. Ford claims the F-150 Police Responder has a 7,000-pound tow capacity, which is on par with the civilian FX4 after you consider the added weight police vehicles typically incur.

Ford has yet to announced when it will begin delivery of the new pickup to government agencies, but it assures us that Ne’er-do-wells won’t be safe from it on or off-road.

ford f-150 police responder

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

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57 Comments on “Ford Delivers Another ‘Pursuit Rated’ Vehicle to Law Enforcement...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I observed the police of the Moapa Indian Reservation (north of Las Vegas) already using previous gen F-150s as marked patrol vehicles earlier in the year.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The Sheriff department in my county has a few dark grey F-150s (including a current bodystyle truck, which replaced a previous generation F-150 that was crashed in the line of duty, as it were) and a Silverado. In addition, they have some sedans, as they (and the PD in the county seat town where the S.O. is located) bought some of the last 2011 Crown Vics P.I.s, which are still in service. They also have a previous style Charger I believe, or it may be gone as I haven’t seen it at all lately.

      The P.D. has one early 2000s Crown Vic that they use for traffic enforcement in the school zone located in town. You occasionally see it parked in the fire lane (of course) of the local grocery store, which also has a deli, so I assume they’re picking up lunch.

      The county below mine, which I am in frequently as it has the biggest town in a 40 mile radius with things like 24 hour restaurants and a Walmart Supercenter (of course) along other stores, has mostly “Interceptor Utilities”, a few older Chargers and Crown Vics, and one recently acquired “Interceptor Sedan”. The only current-style Chargers I see are unmarked (but clearly police-spec, also with government plates and spot lights) cars. I think I’ve seen a police Tahoe, but I don’t think it was from this area.

      The state troopers and DOT law enforcement use Chargers, F-150s, Interceptor Utilities, and a few Silverados and older Tahoes.

      Noticeably absent is the Chevy Caprice PPV, which I only see very occasionally in other places in this region. I’m sure that’s a fluke since it comes from the most important automobile continent in the world, and is therefore automatically far superior to any of what I listed above.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      28, some eye candy I thought you’d enjoy.

      Best Panther evahhh, new headlights and it would bling
      https://gulfport.craigslist.org/cto/d/lincon-town-car-loaded/6184802013.html

      3800 SuperCharged goodness:
      https://mobile.craigslist.org/cto/d/buick-riviera-supercharged/6207965816.html

      Or, if you’d prefer it in a sedan:
      https://hattiesburg.craigslist.org/cto/d/buick-regal-gs/6203952528.html

      I want it so bad, its my pick of this list:
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      Nice B body Olds:
      https://lafayette.craigslist.org/cto/d/oldsmobile-royale-brougham/6211914666.html

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Go buy that Riv. Failing that, the fat Townie.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Let the off topicness continue (hey, its still about cars, at least we’re not arguing about politics).

          I *appreciate* the Riv. But my heart would simply stop functioning if I didn’t buy a 1998 Mark VIII LSC first.

          I *love* the Ninety-Eight. No equivalent FoMoCo product compares, except perhaps that Town Car and of the two, I choose the Olds. Even though I hate a carburetor and am an admitted Ford guy at heart, the Olds has my number.

          Okay, if I need a 3800-powered FWD car, I’ll take a SuperCharged Bonnie. Not as special as the Riv, I know, but I like em.

          Just be glad I didn’t include the 1989 and 1995 Taurus’ also on my list. :)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’d love a Mark VIII too but after hearing from former owners I fear it was built for a specific lifespan and thats it. Despite GM build quality, our LORD will keep said Riv on the road.

            That example Ninety Eight didn’t seem worth the price. Maybe if it was the 403. Maybe.

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    The Supercrew F150 with a 2.7L V6 is rated 0-60 in 5.8 – 6.4 seconds depending on gearing ratio, that’s pretty quick, I suspect this 3.5L should be even faster.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Keep in mind, this truck is 4wd, too.

      In keeping with that, it doesn’t sound like this truck is really intended for very much highway duty, but instead for rual areas (like mine) with lots of dirt roads and washed out gullies which would rip a Charger or Taurus to shreds, especially if you’re chasing someone or trying to bust a remote meth lab in action or something.

      Does the Tahoe PPV still exist? I think so, but its not like it can’t stand to have some competition, and as 28 and I have observed, some agencies are already employing F-150s. Makes sense that they do a full-on police version to cater to the obvious demand.

      • 0 avatar
        johnnyz

        In MN I have put 12k mi per year on a 2004, then a 2014 4×4 durango, Grand Cherokee and now a 2016 4×4 f150. 4×4 with highway miles is no problem, just don’t leave it in 4 Lo.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          johnnyz, I understand and I didn’t mean to suggest that 4wd would be detrimental to longevity, just to acceleration due to the added weight, and likely the gearing associated with the FX-4 Off Road package, as these have.

          I have no problem believing a 4wd American truck will last a long, long time. But, in the body of my post, I was referring to the intended market for this truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes they still make the Tahoe PPV and it was relatively recently that they added a 4wd PPV version. Previously if you wanted 4wd in your police equipped Tahoe you had to settle for a SSV or special service vehicle.

        Like GM Ford has used the SSV moniker to describe a vehicle set up for police use but not designed for high speed pursuit. They have been offering a F150 and Expedition SSV for a number of years. This new Responder moniker seems to be a new segment for Ford fitting in between the SSV and Interceptor.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Its officially happening…NOOOOOOOOO!!!! Soon every police department across the nation will be patrolling our roads with farm equipment (but they may also need it to haul a 2×4 from home depot)

    It was already well under way as I feel like so many police departments have been adopting the Tahoe for police duty. The truckization of our country continues to gain steam.

    Horrible use of tax dollars to buy so many Tahoes and Pickups to be thrown away with high miles in a year or two. I long for the Crown Vic’s return. What ever happened with Carbon Motor’s diesel police cruiser? This is truly aweful. Thanks for ruining my day Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “What ever happened with Carbon Motor’s diesel police cruiser?”

      They went bankrupt like 4 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      A Crown Vic can go off road? Probably further into the rough stuff than any current non-truck police car, but being limited to pavement has been a disadvantage to rual agencies for years, so much so that they are buying civilian pickups and converting them to law enforcement duty. Why not build a special police model that’s already equipped and designed with law enforcement input?

      “Tahoes and Pickups to be thrown away with high miles in a year or two.”

      Except even lesser cars are kept longer than that by most of the country’s law enforcement in the places I’ve lived in (basically every area in the continental US outside of the salt-belt).

      And American trucks from both Ford and GM are notoriously long lived. I’ve seen more Ford and GM trucks/Full-size SUVs with over 300k than I have Camrys and Accords.

      I would put money on them lasting longer and providing better service than the Charger or Caprice PPV. I’d bet even more money if it was a rual area where law enforcement vehicles are subjected to more than just chasing down speeders on the interstate.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Since it is a pickup and pickups have a higher min retirement age, whether miles or years the F150 SSVs have a longer service life than the cars. Even with 150k miles a SSV F150 will sell for at least 50% more than a Charger Pursuit or Caprice PPV with 100K miles, at least in my area.

        Yes a P71 can go off road and they were tested on some of the same areas of the proving grounds that Ford tested their pickups.

        As I mentioned above Ford has been building SSV F150 and Expeditions for the police market for some time, right off the shelf with no special order involved. This is just something that is presumed to meet the MSP’s and LAPD’s definition of a pursuit rated vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Horrible use of tax dollars to buy so many Tahoes”

      The Tahoe is BY FAR the best patrol vehicle out there. I would much rather see the officers in my town in a proper Tahoe than the unsafe Fords or this laughable pickup.

      It’s hardly a waste of tax dollars. You have any idea what police vehicles cost?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @EBFlex/SilvyZ71 – If it was GM that came up with a Silverado Pursuit, (and they will eventually), you’d be absolutely gushing! The Tahoe is just a Silverado station wagon.

        But cop cars based on unibody cars are a bad idea anyway, especially FWDs and FWD based AWDs. They just can’t stand up to abuse and industrial use.

        Another great thing is “BOF trucks” means frames can easily be straightened after a moderate crash, then straight cabs, beds, etc from other crashed cop cars can simply be mounted. Excellent use of tax dollars.

        Btw do Tahoes/Silverados have 5-Star crash ratings like the F-150?

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “I would much rather see the officers in my town in a proper Tahoe than the unsafe Fords or this laughable pickup.”

        Yeah, but think of all the doughnuts one could carry in the bed!

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “What ever happened with Carbon Motor’s diesel police cruiser?”

      it was a stupid idea and anyone who got suckered by those frauds got what they deserved.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    A month or so ago I was messing with AutoTrader when I came upon an F150 Supercrew XL 5.0 V8 4×4 – front bench, fleet white, charcoal interior. I don’t know if it was a cancelled contractor order but damn it was well discounted and tempting.

    I don’t even need a truck!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Nice. I’d order one just like it, but not white and probably not a V-8, but if it was the right truck/price otherwise, I wouldn’t walk away.

      I can’t wait to check out the upcoming TurboDiesel F-150, and I hope they offer it on an XL SuperCrew 4×4. I’d probably get a 2.7L as it stands today, maybe 28 won’t disown me for buying a V-6 of less than 3 liters. Haha

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      @ PrincipalDan: But you WANT a truck.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        @Firestorm,

        Don’t let anyone (here or elsewhere) tell you that’s a bad thing. There are B&B that would guilt a Texas oil tycoon into a Prius C if they could.

        • 0 avatar
          Firestorm 500

          I couldn’t find a good used truck that wasn’t sky high in price and miles. I bought a new 2015 F-150 FX4, 3.5 Twin Turbo Ecoboost XLT. Thrilled with the truck, and thrilled to be back in a truck.

          I have to have a vehicle that I can do more with than just run up and down the road. I don’t think that I’ll ever own a car again.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I can see why people buy them.

            Its the same reason people bought Galaxies, Impalas, and Newports by the boatload. Quiet, comfortable, well built, affordable family transportation that is versatile.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Congrats.

            Glad you enjoy it.

            BigRobertRyan and EcoBoost Flex will be so pleased to hear it.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Dan, do you still have the F150 Heritage?

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        That’s reason numero uno I don’t need a truck.

        2004 F150 Heritage – purchased in 2006, long paid off, depreciated to the point where all I carry on it is liability, I barely drive it enough to justify a once a year oil change. It came in darn handy in moving from the hither-lands to town in early July and it comes in handy for making me look like a good son-in-law when the in-laws need to haul wood stove pellets a ton at a time.

        In 2019 I’ll be looking to replace my daily driver and I certainly don’t NEED a truck. But I can clearly see why so many desire them.

        Right now I’m in the mode of “Save the SEDAN.” I grew up in nice quiet sedans and they’ve always had a special place in my heart.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    A VERY wealthy town near me (Inverness, IL) has at least 1 newish 4dr F-150 as a cop car to roam the 6.5 sq miles or so of mansions and well-manicured lawns and parks. Not exactly sure why, but it makes it hard to hide in a speed trap, so heck, whatever.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Gotta love Ford. They are throwing around the “Pursuit” term just as much as they throw around the “Eco” term. Applying both when they shouldn’t.

    This is no more “pursuit rated” than the laughable Fusion Hybrid or 2.0L Taurus.

    It’s fun to watch Ford certify things but yet do no actual testing to back it up

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Pursuit rated vehicles have oil coolers, transmission coolers, larger engine coolers, bigger brakes, etc. A key to being a pursuit vehicle is the ability to outlast a typical vehicle in an aggressive driving scenario.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      They don’t put the pursuit rated name on the vehicle, that is left for the MSP and LAPD, Currently they are stating on the website that they believe that it will meet the requirements, but it won’t be official until the tests are done.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Yep, they test nothing. How do I know? Duh, its FORD! I know for a FACT that they have NEVER tested this truck. How do I know that? C’mon, its FORD! Of course its all lies and evilness.

      EcoBoost Flex does it again.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    “It’s fun to watch Ford certify things but yet do no actual testing to back it up”

    That could be said of a lot of companies, and government agencies.

    Quote attributed to Henry Ford, and probably others: “90% of everything is bunk.”

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Calgary has a very interesting police fleet. Lots of Econolines, and a few have been replaced with Transits. The E-Series looks great in police livery, the Transits… not so much.

    Still a few Vics plying the streets, a lot of Explorers, a lot of Taurus. No ChryCo or GM police vehicles.

    And yes, quite a few modern F-150s. The interesting thing? I was talking to a cop at a Stampede public meet n greet deal, and they are apparently phasing out the trucks as they mile out because they don’t have good enough crash test ratings.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @davefromcalgary – the municipal police vehicles in my town are a mix of Explorers, Taurus, 4×2 and 4×4 Tahoe’s, and Suburbans. Some of the rural units are crewcab 3/4 ton Chevies and Fords. I’ve seen a Ram 1500 crew ghost car but as of yet, no F150’s. The paddywagons used to be Ford E series but now are Chevy vans. There are still a few Crown Vic’s in service.

  • avatar
    gasser

    While I can certainly understand the use of such heavy duty vehicles in rural/suburban areas, I am mystified at the justification for such SUV/trucks here in Los Angeles. Both the LA County Sheriff and the Beverly Hills Police patrol in gas sucking SUVs,Tahoes. I’m sure they will welcome a new 4X4 option from Ford.
    The hills are not steep, the only unpaved areas are soccer fields, and snow/ice is non-existent.
    Driving almost 100% in city traffic, my speed and mileage are identical, 14 mph and 14 mpg. If ever an area cried out for hybrids, this is it.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      In actual police service 2wd Tahoe PPVs get better MPG than the Charger Pursuit and its Hemi. Not as good as the Ford Interceptors but not the worst of the bunch either.

      In total cost of operation the Tahoes also are much lower than the Charger Pursuit, with greater up time and resale value too.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Scoutdude – in BC I have yet to see a Charger police vehicle. 4×2 Tahoe’s are very common. The Tahoe and Explorer seem to be the new “Crown Vic”.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Chargers are pretty rare around here too. A number of agencies that bought them when they first came out only bought that one batch. However I have seen some recent purchases of Chargers for unmarked use by our state patrol and the city of Seattle had a bunch of brand new Chargers lined up outside of SeaFair last years, despite the fact that it didn’t make it past the first round when they first did in use testing for replacement of the Crown Vics

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I meant to add that all of the local county police cars I’ve seen come through auction in recent years have a sticker that says, “No duty is so important or call so urgent that we can not proceed with caution and arrive safely” or words to that effect.

          That is not to say that there aren’t times and places where having a car capable of doing 120mph isn’t a good idea, just that there are limited situations where it is safely usable.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Scoutdude – friends of mine in the BC Ambulance Service have told me that “they” are considering eliminating “lights and sirens” responses. Statistically there is a marginal difference in response times but crash rates rise markedly. I doubt that would ever happen because it would be a PR nightmare.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        I’d believe all except the fuel economy bit – is that proven or speculation? My only experience with Tahoe’s do not include the current gen but historically they’ve not been exactly fuel sippers. But I’ve also never seen a 2×4 let alone drive one. 2 wheel drive anything is virtually unheard of and has horrible resale value in my area.
        Our local sheriff and Highway patrol both have AWD Chargers. They put snow tires on in the winter, I’ve seen them chew through some impressive driftage. The Sheriff has been quoted in the paper as saying his officers are very satisfied with these units.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yes this was from the guy at the top of the public works dept who said that the Tahoes were using less fuel than the Chargers. A big factor in that, in my opinion, was how the officers drove the Charger, they seemed to take pretty much any opportunity to exercise that Hemi. It seemed that being behind the wheel of a Hemi powered Charger somehow distorts the view put the windshield and makes traffic lights look like Christmas trees.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    “We condemned Ford for its bragging, mainly because Chevrolet already provided a hybrid police vehicle and there was no concrete evidence that the Police Responder Hybrid Sedan was actually pursuit-rated. Unfortunately, we may be forced to do that all over again with Ford’s new F-150 Police Responder pickup. It’s another new, likely welcome, entry into the automaker’s extensive law enforcement fleet that leaves us doubting the validity of the terminology used.”

    Did you reach out to Ford and ask them specifically what they mean by Pursuit Rated? Or did you just condem them (your words) for using a meaningless term because you don’t know what their meaning behind it is?

    I believe Ford has guidelines as to what they consider Pursuit Rated. Maybe if we knew what they were…no, its easier to just point and laugh without truly knowing why.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Did you reach out to Ford and ask them specifically what they mean by Pursuit Rated?”

      No, because that would be actual *work.*

      can’t expect that.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    In reality very few agencies pay any attention to the MSP and LAPD tests. They are more concerned with costs and up time.

    A while back someone posted a link to the Seattle PD’s police vehicle testing, I think it was Dal, when they were faced with the demise of the Panther.

    They bought one of every police vehicle at the time and put them to work carefully tracking their cost of operation, down time and officer ergonomics. Once they had narrowed it down to 3 some civil rights orginization sued them for not considering passenger comfort, specifically how easy it was for the officer to smack the suspects head on the C pillar when performing the stuff portion of the cuff and stuff maneuver.

    So their criteria ended up being fuel economy, carbon emissions (this is Seattle after all), cost of repairs, up time, cost of acquisition, officer ergonomics, ability to upfit and how easy it is to bust a perp’s skull. Top speed, 0-60 times and lap times were not even considered. I have a friend and former neighbor who is the head of the public works dept for a local city. Every vehicle purchase needs his signature to be processed. Again the primary criteria are the total costs, not acceleration or top speed and this guy is a gear head who has a gasser style 55 Chevy complete with tilt front end, leaf springs and straight axle.

  • avatar
    hamish42

    I’d like to think that at the same time they are going full-military spec on these vehicles that they are also hustling them off to Skip Barber to give them an idea what to do with them.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    So, what is great or new about this??

    Australia back in the 60s used F 100s with 351s as police vehicles. They were very common.

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/a8/14/89/a814892e2e13788691e950643e13c101.jpg

    If the US wants a pickup police car, why not the Raptor?

    http://resources.carsguide.com.au/styles/cg_hero_large/s3/Ford-F150-Raptor-NSW-Police-Highway-Patrol-joshua-dowling-(3).jpg

    Our cops use your (better still Aussie) Chev SS’es or as we call them Commodores. They were as common as dog sh!t. Far superior vehicle for police work than a F150 and much faster. F-150s are speed limited to 98mph, even my diesel Mazda midsizer is quicker, 114mph, with lift, nuggety off road tyres, bull bar and other co-efficient drags.

    https://res.cloudinary.com/carsguide/image/upload/f_auto,fl_lossy,q_auto,t_cg_hero_low/v1/editorial/dp/albums/album-5786/lg/HSV-GTS-Police-car-4.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      mason

      The Raptor as a DD police unit would be a total waste of tax payer dollars. You don’t need Baja style suspension, 37″ tires and a cranked up buzz box under the hood to patrol the asphalt jungles. Even in rural areas a standard 4×4 with good A/T’s is more than sufficient.
      The speed limiters on trucks is mostly due to speed ratings on LT tires. The majority of civilian trucks have no need to exceed 100 mph. That’s well above the posted speed limits even in the west. As a pursuit vehicle I’m sure Ford could source a specialty tire with a higher speed rating and increase the trucks speed limiters. It doesn’t seem as though the demand is there though.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Certainly the availability of tires with higher speed ratings that the common LT tires is one of the reasons that they set the speed limiter where they do. However in the face of that speed limiter, set based on the tires there is no reason to for example design a driveshaft that can handle any more speed. So it might not be as simple as getting Goodyear to mix up a batch of tires in the right size and speed rating. It’s not like the rest of the Ford line up doesn’t leave the factory on police specific Goodyears in sizes that aren’t necessarily used on the civilian versions. On the other hand it isn’t like Ford hasn’t whipped up Police specific drive shafts in the past.

        So they certainly could do it but as you speculate Ford doesn’t think there would be enough demand. If they need a unit to go faster than that they can step up to an Interceptor instead of a Responder or SSV.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Who’d want to push a 4×4 pickup above 98 mph for any sustained period of time?

          Police forces will buy these for rural patrols and urban areas with significant decay or areas facing more harsh winter conditions.

          I seriously doubt high speed freeway use will ever be a primary purchase metric for one of these trucks.

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