By on June 2, 2021

Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

The pandemic isn’t over, but here in the U.S., we’re rolling toward normalcy, and assuming nothing drastic changes, we’ll get there as more folks get vaccinated.

Hopefully, the rest of the world will follow in fairly short order.

Of course, normalcy might be defined a little differently going forward. Many of us have made behavioral changes to avoid getting sick with the coronavirus this past year, and some of us may continue to engage in those behaviors going forward for one reason or another.

I’ve talked to folks who say they will continue to mask up, at least some of the time, because masking up has not only helped keep them COVID-free but also helped them avoid colds and the flu.

As for me, I’ve been keeping a small spray bottle of hand sanitizer that’s sold at Walgreen’s in the car. Not just because I swap cars every week, but also because I can’t afford Instacart on a blogger salary and have had to venture into the grocery store to feed myself. I’ve done so throughout the pandemic, and while we know the virus is mostly spread via droplets, it still gives me some peace of mind to know that if there is any virus on my hands, I can kill it before I touch my face.

I was never the type of person to carry Purell around pre-pandemic, though I’ve always been a diligent hand-washer. But I might become that person post-pandemic. At the very least, I can see keeping a bottle of sanitizer in the car foreseeable future. At least until I run out one day, well after the world is fully reopened and the threat of the virus is diminished, forget to replace it, and quietly go back to the old ways.

What automotive-related change have you made because of the pandemic? Will you be keeping sanitizer in the car like me? Wearing a mask in an Uber even if it’s no longer required? Driving more, either for fun or to avoid public transit? Something else?

Sound off below.

[Image: Lightspring/Shutterstock.com]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

97 Comments on “QOTD: What Auto-Related Pandemic Behavior Will Stay With You?...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Definitely the hand sanitizer. I keep a little vial of it from Bath and Body Works in my pocket (the scent matches my other stuff I use from there).

    And am I the only one who hasn’t gotten sick **at all** since the mask-wearing and enhanced personal hygiene began? Probably not. But I’m not wearing masks in places that don’t require them anymore. Nice to be able to read my grocery list without fogging up my glasses.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      A pediatrician friend predicted that at the beginning of the pandemic that general flu and cold illnesses would drop to near zero with all the masking taking place. He was right.

      Those who say Covid masks were/are worthless never explain this result, nor why surgeons wear masks. Simply put, personal interactions are dirty, and a barrier of any kind makes them cleaner.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Between vague symptoms and faulty PCR tests don’t discount the number of traditional flu cases which are miscategorized as Covid.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          28-Cars-Later,

          Ah, yes, the sold as almost perfect PCR tests that apparently are, in fact, wildly inaccurate. Dr Death (Fauci) seems to be falling from grace. Something about his funding (with NIH funds) of gain of function testing at some lab in Wuhan. Such a naughty boy.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “nor why surgeons wear masks.”

        Surgeons wear masks to stop the potential transfer of germs from the surgeon to the patient.
        I’m open to reading alternative data but everything I’ve seen says medical masks protect the public from the wearer to a *much* higher degree than it protects the wearer from the public.
        It seems unlikely that a person is going to be able to personally avoid colds/flu by wearing cloth or medical masks if they return to 2019 levels of personal interaction and are the only person wearing a mask in those settings.

        • 0 avatar
          FerrariLaFerrariFace

          That’s 100% correct. Wearing masks was never *supposed* to be about protecting yourself, but about protecting others from from you, since it’s likely you can be walking around infected without knowing it for a long time, if ever.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The controversial Danish study -which used 98% filtering PPE- found negligible difference between the two groups. Cloth masks, which I observed were the majority used at the height of this last year, offer near zero effectiveness all around. Given 98% PPE had a 0.03% lower chance of infection even if useless cloth masks were *double*, that’s still only a 0.06% chance of infection vs 0.03% with 98% PPE. Creating an insane society over 0.03% chance of lower infection of a disease with a 98%+ survival rate speaks for itself.

            Oh and all of the mortality percentage data based on last year is inaccurate because the PCR tests were wildly incorrect. Even if the mortality figures were accurate, the total “cases” those are divided against are not, so the true survival rate is likely past 99%. I’m sure they will improve those figures when its time for Plandemic Phase II.

            “In the non-face mask group, 2.1 percent of participants were infected with new coronavirus, while 1.8 percent of participants in the face mask-wearing group were infected.”

            https://www.thelocal.dk/20201118/danish-study-finds-no-clear-evidence-face-masks-protect-wearer-from-covid-19-infection/

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Speak of the devil:

            https://www.zerohedge.com/political/not-really-effective-fauci-panned-masks-preventing-covid-19-infection-email

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            You know, if a journalist wants me to take him seriously, he posts stuff under his real name, not “Tyler Durden.” What’s next – some guy named “Clark Kent”? But I digress.

            From the story you posted:
            “…Fauci replies: Masks are really for infected people to prevent them from spreading infection to people who are not infected rather than protecting uninfected people from acquiring infection.”

            Mask-wearing was always meant to make sure people didn’t unwittingly spread the virus. And it worked.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Freed

            Occam’s Razor suggests placebo for the masses, which explains the flip flops which are detailed in the article.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Cloth masks do not have “near-zero” effectiveness. When used near-universally in congregate settings, they reduce infection rates by about half. That’s not enough to give any individual wearer confidence that they are protected, and it’s not enough to protect people in medical settings. But it is enough to change the trajectory of a pandemic.

            Those of us in cities will eventually be on crowded public transit. We’d save a lot of winter colds if we all wore cloth masks on the bus and train.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Danish scientific study yielded a 0.03% rate of less infection with 98% PPE vs the non-mask control group. Less than half a percent is near zero, given this science I’m puzzled why anyone would think a simple piece of cloth would somehow reduce infection rates by 50% since the actual PPE barely reduced infections. Placebo effect at best outside of a medical setting.

            “We’d save a lot of winter colds if we all wore cloth masks on the bus and train.”

            I do agree with this point, and would have been more on board with this if: 1. State Media stopped hyping this bullsh!t after it was clear we weren’t all going to die and 2. adults were treated like adults and allowed to make their own decisions. Is such behavior generally a good idea in public transport? Perhaps, and people are free to do so from now until eternity. Maybe that’s a silver lining?

            If this thing had gone really south nobody reasonable would argue against any of the excessive edicts out of fear and pragmatism no matter their scientific effectiveness. Once it became clear what it was, while arms of the state continued to pretend it was still a potential COG scenario, the agenda became very clear to anyone with open eyes. Please don’t bother arguing this good of the many stuff either, don’t forget the mentality of the Feds. These are the same people who order drone strikes on weddings and bomb Gaza.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Simple face masks and even cloth masks DO provide a degree of protection. It takes a certain viral load to get past your normal defence mechanisms. It’s been shown that masks are effective at reducing rates of transmission. One can cite outliers on both ends of the spectrum but that’s not what professionals base their recommendations upon.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “It seems unlikely that a person is going to be able to personally avoid colds/flu by wearing cloth or medical masks if they return to 2019 levels of personal interaction and are the only person wearing a mask in those settings.”

          100% this.

          It’s like every web forum in the world: full of misinformation by people who invent things out of thin air, then swear by it and judge you for not living by it.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        If you have need of a mask, these are my favorite by far:

        “[10Pack] [Black, hueGREEN] – KF94 SAFETY FACE MASK ; Premium 4Layer Filters Safety Mask”

        I like having baby wipes in the car after buying fuel and checking the oil and might keep a package in there forever.

        I have been driving much less and combining trips when I do get out. [I have a recently-developed theory (two days old) that 30%+ of vehicles on the road at any given time don’t need to be there].

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Where should they be? If you mean to say 30% of traffic should be at home because of remote work technology/remote learning technology I agree but I’ll raise it to 50%.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @28, what I’m saying [not very well?] is, if you stopped a typical driver during non-commute times and asked them why they are on the road at that particular moment, where else they had been that day and what they were trying to accomplish, there is a significant chance (over 25%) that they could have done what they are trying to do now as part of a different trip.

            (Agree that working from home and potential delivery services would make the number even higher.)

            [Restatement: Some of the people driving stupidly are also driving for stupid reasons.]

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree with your point.

      • 0 avatar
        Rick T.

        Flu cases are never reported but rely on a formula done by the CDC. Enough said.

        It’s very possible it’s more a matter of not going out and about to work or other places and therefore limiting your exposure to other people. Tough to catch a cold when you’re working from home and ordering from Uber Eats and Instacart.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Rick T – https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/how-cdc-estimates.htm

          You aren’t providing the whole truth. They use a formula to calculate unreported cases.

          Canada reports cases per 100,000 but includes all pneumonia. We are 15-23 cases per 100,000. That combined total is still much less than the annual infection and death rate from COVID-19.

      • 0 avatar
        Southerner

        I call BS on your stats about flu and cold. Surgeons wear tippety-top of the line masks, think Rolls, and don’t put them in a pocket between ops. Any mask not at least the quality of N-95 will no more contain the virus than a chain link fence will contain smoke.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Southerner – LOL.

          Wrong.

          Surgeons typically wear a “level 3” mask. It is a simple face mask that provides splash protection.

          A N95 would be worn only for patients with Tuberculosis or similar infective diseases.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “Those who say Covid masks were/are worthless never explain this result, nor why surgeons wear masks. Simply put, personal interactions are dirty, and a barrier of any kind makes them cleaner.”

        That would require every party in a gathering to be masked. One unmasked person, who is carrying a virus, can spread it to everyone in the area.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’ll be more likely to buy a car online, as long as a test drive and/or return policy are included. This isn’t because of germs, but a general distaste for dealerships.

  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    During the pandemic, I learned how to tear down and rebuild a Triumph straight six, set up and tune its ZS carburetors. I also learned to use a 3D CAD program to design custom suspension parts. Hopefully those skills stay with me.
    Like SCE, I also became a big fan of buying and selling a car online. I sold my truck to Carvana, and would have bought from them if they had what I wanted in stock.

  • avatar
    don1967

    Since the pandemic began I’ve been giggling at displays of public maskurbation in cars (ie: people masking up while driving alone). I’ll come to my senses just as soon as they do.

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      I’ve been guilty of this. Mainly its because I’ve gotten so accustomed to wearing it, I forget to take it off occasionally. Also sometimes going from place to place in quick succession, it’s more of a bother to keep taking it on and off than just leaving it on the whole time.
      Go ahead and laugh if you want, but I suspect this is the case for most of those people. It’s not done out of fear, but forgetfulness and/or convenience.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Well, one thing I will be glad to not be keeping is the driving to pretty much any worksite we get that doesn’t touch the Pacific Ocean. Honestly the drives out were OK…it was the drives back when you are all done and ready to be home that were no fun.

    As for things I’ll keep…Meme Stocks, Sunday Drives, AirPods, and Trunion Upgrades on my LS powerplants.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I already hated public transit and taking planes before this. Now I’ll just avoid them even more.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      #DefundPublicTransit

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Great idea if you’d like to see a lot more traffic.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Nah, just walk and ride your bike. There is sales data showing RE buyers/renters willing to pay a premium for this now. The rest of us will stay out of the urban death maze and continue on as we already were.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Methinks you are not being realistic.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I did recently fly into your airport, but I have never visited Denver. However if your fellow citizens are anything like the militant bike people I have witnessed, oh they can walk or ride to fight ManBearPig, or that little brainwashed b!tch, or whatever nuttery they profess now. To do anything else is a mortal sin in their belief system.

  • avatar
    Lynchenstein

    Drive Through! I’m doing it waaay more often now and I kinda prefer it.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      I hear you. For me it will probably be paying at the pump. As an old pump jockey, I insisted in paying in person, but now I will probably pay at the pump, if only to avoid those who hold everyone else up with fists full of lottery tickets for the clerk to check.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “here in the U.S., we’re rolling toward normalcy”

    Data point A) ‘Herd immunity’ = ’60 to 90%’ vaccination rate

    Data point B) U.S. ‘fully vaccinated’ rate as of June 1 2021 = 41.4%

    I missed the part in science class where 41 is equal to 70. (Help me understand.)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Help me understand”

      The phrase “rolling towards” is different than “we have achieved”. Herd immunity also isn’t a zero-sum light switch.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Thanks ajla. I wasn’t intending to pick on Tim’s choice of wording. I have people near me who have definitely flipped the switch to “Done With Pandemics” and I just don’t understand the thinking. Ok I understand *their* thinking if they were just waiting for the ‘authorities’ to open things up, but I don’t get why the U.S. as a whole is lifting restrictions now, at this point. (Feels a little like a “Mission Accomplished” moment to me, but maybe I’m stuck in Hermit Mode.)

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          “I don’t get why the U.S. as a whole is lifting restrictions now”

          OK, some of the changes make perfect sense, but the way they are being ‘interpreted’ in the real world is resulting in some questionable choices.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “I don’t get why the U.S. as a whole is lifting restrictions now, at this point.”

          Given the fact that the infection rate keeps dropping – here in Colorado, it’s less than half what it was a month ago – I think keeping all the restrictions in place would just p*ss people off.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I don’t get why the U.S. as a whole is lifting restrictions now, at this point.”

            It’s a damned if you do/don’t inflection point. Restrictions continue and more people rebel or ease off and hope a “variants” don’t take hold and make a mess of things.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I don’t think you’re in hermit mode as I understand your satire over “mission accomplished”. However the perpetrators have likely succeeded in their mission and realize if they keep the economy closed it will create even more serious problems and possibly stability issues. I imagine they are keen to avoid Kent State Part II, at least for the moment.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @28, you really think the U.S. faked the moon landings? (Serious question)

            [Follow-up: Faked in whole or in part?]

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            No, do you believe Oswald was the sole assassin of President Kennedy who did it for mental health and odd political reasons?

            The Feds claimed this was the case:

            “Its 888-page final report was presented to President Johnson on September 24, 1964,[4] and made public three days later.[5] It concluded that President Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald and that Oswald acted entirely alone.[6] It also concluded that Jack Ruby acted alone when he killed Oswald two days later.[7] The Commission’s findings have proven controversial and have been both challenged and supported by later studies.”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_Commission

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “but I don’t get why the U.S. as a whole is lifting restrictions now, at this point.”

          ¯|_(ツ)_/¯

          I don’t know enough about the inner workings of the CDC, NIH, or state governments to say. Like Mike said though cases are falling. Maybe the rate of the fall was enough to satisfy the people making decisions? The empirical effectiveness of the vaccine is also something of a game changer.

          This is the official CDC guidance about activity after you’re fully vaccinated and speaking personally if I was open to following them in June 2020 then I’m open to following them in June 2021.

          cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-
          ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated-
          guidance.html

          As far as other folks are concerned, I can’t do much about what they decide to do.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          (Feels a little like a “Mission Accomplished” moment to me, but maybe I’m stuck in Hermit Mode.)

          You may be right, but anyone who isn’t vaccinated by now doesn’t want to be.

          “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job!”

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “…anyone who isn’t vaccinated by now doesn’t want to be.”

            Except for kids.

            Once the kids are vaccinated, we can let nature take its course with the voluntary-anti-vaxxers.

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            Agree, Luke. However, only about 2.5% of the anti-vaxxers will die from Covid if they get it. At least some of them might have the chance to learn a valuable lesson or two while spending a few long days on a respirator.

            Meanwhile, how has the pandemic changed my driving habits? I used a squeegee at a gas station today, and wondered how many unwashed, ungloved people had used it before I did. It’s the driver’s equivalent of a shopping cart.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “we’ll get there as more folks get vaccinated” – just give them some french-fries and they’ll do it

    “Hopefully, the rest of the world will follow…” – In San Marino and Israel they’re already done with it.

    “I’ve talked to folks who say they will continue to mask up..” – Yea, I see some crazies walking around development in masks.

    “masking up has not only helped keep them COVID-free but also helped them avoid colds and the flu” – also prevented from hip replacements, professional dental hygiene, elective surgeries and other health maintenance. Did mask really prevent any flu? Or may be, because kids did not go to schools, where most of it being transmitted, and people worked from home en-mass?

    “As for me, I’ve been keeping a small spray bottle of hand sanitizer” – don’t forget, sanitizer also dries your skin that leads to cracks and pathway to bacteria.

    The only modification I’ve made – I don’t touch my face anymore when I am not home. Yes, you can touch a door handle, then your nose. There is a small chance to transfer COVID into your body. Eliminating this chance is all you need.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Report from grocery store

    Even though masks are no longer required in the store here, on the last trip I saw 85% of people wearing them in store.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I noticed the same thing. Although, I was sticking to my mask because we get a lot of green pollen floating through the air almost like a fog and the mask works well.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      As near as I can tell, based on the neighbors whose vaccination status I know, the people who are still wearing masks are mostly vaccinated.

      But, looks like the new CDC rules have had almost the exact opposite of the intended effect on people’s behavior.

      It looks like the vaccination rate is high enough that the anti-maskers haven’t quite succeeded in wrecking it for the responsible people, though.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Why do you feel “anti-maskers” are trying to prevent people from getting the injection? You can realize less than PPE masks are and always were pointless and not even hold an opinion on what other people do with *their* health. Kinda like certain parties should bite their tongue about other people’s health and concentrate on their own.

        On the same subject, vaxxites can shed spike protein and State Media moved quickly to quash the opinion of one scientist. Whether he is right or wrong, bullsh!t arguments can be usually debunked quickly. So why is State Media censoring ***any dissent*** to the official line? Maybe vaxxed should be separated so they don’t infect the rest of us?

        “Case in point, Twitter recently suspended the account of Luigi Warren, apparently for violating the Twitter Rules. Luigi’s now-penalised tweet addressed his views on whether spike protein is shed by people vaccinated with mRNA vaccines.

        For those unaware, Luigi Warren is the current President and CEO of Cellular Reprogramming, Inc, a biotechnology firm based in California. More importantly, Luigi is renowned for his work with Derrick Rossi, the co-founder of the famous biotechnology company Moderna.

        Back in 2010, Luigi and Derrick worked together to be the first to describe mRNA-based reprogramming in a pathbreaking paper in Cell Stem Cell, titled Highly efficient reprogramming to pluripotency and directed differentiation of human cells with synthetic modified mRNA. The work was named one of the top ten scientific breakthroughs of 2010 by the journal Science, as well as one of the top ten medical breakthroughs of the year by TIME magazine.

        In short, Luigi is one of the pioneers of the prevalent applications of mRNA technology, possibly including the Covid-19 vaccine. Twitter deleting his post on the grounds of fake information seems to be a bit far-fetched move in disguise of a fact check.

        Luigi pointed this out in an appeal to the flagged content. He mentioned to Twitter how he believes that the reason he was locked out of Twitter is unfair and that he is “the inventor of the technology on which Moderna was founded,” and so he knows what he is talking about.

        https://www.indiatoday.in/technology/news/story/mrna-technology-pioneer-says-covid-19-vaccinated-people-can-shed-spike-protein-twitter-says-delete-this-1809062-2021-05-31

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I feel we will be dealing with damages from this “vaccine” in decades to come https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/americas-frontline-doctors-covid-vaccinated-can-shed-spike-protein-harming-unvaccinated

          In fact, this resembles car’s autopilot. It is not approved but everyone uses it

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    Sanitizer, yes. Masks, no – they fog my glasses – not so good when driving. Plus, the only people I was in a car with, I lived with. Throughout the Chicom virus pandemic, most people in my area did a lousy job of mask wearing. From time to time, I’d see drivers actually wearing a cloth neck gaiter, which is as useful at stopping a virus as your skivvies are at stopping a fart.
    There is a report of first human flu infection of the upcoming season – H10N3. Can you guess where it occurred? Consequently, I’ll keep a couple of N95 masks in the car and follow the fitting instructions from my daughter, the nurse. And I’ll wear one when getting out of the car for an October flu shot.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Not driving to work and throwing away over an hour of time sitting in traffic! My company has seen the light… I can now work from home 3 days a week. I thought this day would never come. For once the executives looked at the data and realized that the office is, in fact, the primary source of productivity loss. Co-workers now longer surprise me with unscheduled cubical visits regarding random requests or extra tasks. In general I noticed a welcome uptick in respect for my personal space and my time since COVID for which I am thankful for. I hope this continues.

  • avatar
    DougD

    My behavior of no longer commuting for 1.5 hours per day will stay with me. I’ve been working from home for 14 months and my employer sold the building LOL, I guess they realized it wasn’t totally necessary and they enjoyed the large amount of dollars it brought in. Possibly renting smaller office space later, but no word yet and a lot of us want to stay home, at least part of the week.

    In the morning I hear the traffic report on the radio, then I look out my bedroom door to see how much traffic is in the hall slowing me from getting to the spare bedroom.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Zoom meetings. Cut down on travel and cost and meet remotely.
    Distance education/learning. After a year of this, many students have expresses their preference for this type of format. Colleges and universities can drastically cut their overhead by reducing their bricks and mortar costs and converting to distance education.

    As for the efficacy of ‘masks’, there are many different types of masks. Made from a myriad of materials. The major issues are that many fabric/cloth and non-surgical masks are not manufactured to a specific standard. Unlike surgical masks, KN95 and N95 ‘respirators’ which are tested. Also masks need to be ‘fitted’ to be most effective. And there were/are a large number (many millions) of ‘counterfeit’ masks which do not meet any standard but were purported to.

    Someone wearing a fitted N95 should be able to be exposed to a non-masked, infected person, in a small area and still be ‘safe’.

    Those who claim that ‘masking’ does not reduce infection rates and that testing numbers cannot be trusted are ignoring the nuances in the information available.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Last September I was hit and ran by a man piloting a shiny new Mercedes. He was wearing a mask in his own car, so it’s conceivable that he failed to stop out of fear that I’d give him the Chinese virus. I didn’t consider it conceivable that an old white guy in an expensive car would fail to act it so I was pulling over instead of watching his tag number and away he went.

    My post pandemic pandemic habit is I have a dash cam now.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      Yes, dash cams are on the rise.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Were you jaywalking?

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        We were side by side at a red light with another red about 100 yards ahead. I signaled I wanted his lane, the light changed and he didn’t move so I assumed he was giving it to me, I go past him and merge over (at walking speed because the light ahead is still red), he then either noticed our green or made a very late decision that he wasn’t going to give it to me and gassed it directly into my bumper. He then laid on his horn for about 30 seconds to demonstrate his unhappiness, pointed his phone at me for a while, and then changed lanes and drove past me never to be seen again.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I had a dash cam forever now. And even caught a cop cheating. Didn’t get away buy saved few hundred bucks

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    As we know, the vaccine manufacturers advise us that the vaccine reaches full strength four weeks after injection. They also assure us that this strength provides 100% prevention of hospitalization. It follows then that once the vaccine is available to all, there is no reason to restrict civil liberties beyond that. Anyone who contracts the virus after that is doing so of their own volition.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      That is if you get to enjoy your full protections. Israelis, who now have most people vaccinated, start reporting related myocarditis.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The vaccine is not yet available to everyone in my household.

      Hopefully it will be available to everyone in my household by the end of the summer. Until then, the anti-vaxxers are still my problem to deal with.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “They also assure us that this strength provides 100% prevention of hospitalization”

      No they don’t.

      Pfizer is one of the better vaccines and their data showed 96% effectiveness.

      USA data shows the infection rate among fully vaccinated people at 6%. A 94% overall protection rate is excellent.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Whether it is contracted of their own volition or not, you and I are stuck with most of the costs of hospitalizing them and caring for them. Huge numbers of people are either uninsured or poorly insured and cannot pay for care. The government has poured funds into hospitals and medical practices to keep them going. This is why giving out lottery tickets or pick up trucks as prizes to encourage vaccination is worthwhile to society as a whole. I personally believe we are very close to 100% vaccination of all those who will accept it. If your life and the lives of your family are not motivations enough to get the shot, what is??? People who refuse based upon false claims of “experimental”, “changes our DNA”, the “devil invented it” simply cannot be convinced to accept vaccination. I fear that the pandemic will continue to smolder, like “hot spots” after a forest fire. Me and driving? I have masks, gloves, sanitizer and rarely go out, preferring to order in. But what do I know?? I’ve only practiced medicine for the last 50 years.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      So has any of this changed?

      “Importantly, the initial COVID-19 vaccines will prevent symptoms in those who become infected with the coronavirus rather than kill the virus itself, Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said during the Yahoo Finance All Markets Summit on Monday.

      “The primary thing you want to do is that if people get infected, prevent them from getting sick, and if you prevent them from getting sick, you will ultimately prevent them from getting seriously ill,” he said.

      Preventing symptoms is a “primary endpoint” in the vaccine development process, Fauci said. Getting rid of the virus altogether is considered a “secondary endpoint.”

      “What I would settle for, and all of my colleagues would settle for, is the primary endpoint to prevent clinically recognizable disease,” he said. “And that’s what we hope happens, and if we do, that will go a long way to diffusing this very difficult crisis that we’re in.”

      With reduced severe symptoms, the coronavirus would pose a lower threat as a pandemic. Then scientists could focus on developing a solution that would reach the full goal of preventing initial infection.”

      https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20201027/early-vaccines-wil-prevent-symptoms-not-virus

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      People who refuse based upon false claims of “experimental”…

      Well, it is experimental. You even sign the paper that you’re taking an experimental medication.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        1.98 billion COVID-19 vaccines have been administered so far.
        About a billion people have been vaccinated to one degree or another.

        That’s a pretty good sample size.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          1. Not all people were vaccinated with same stuff
          2. Thousands died in the process
          3. Some vaccines in the passed were banned after hundreds died
          4. Millions of bad side effects
          5. Long term effects, like autoimmune diseases – unknown

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “1.98 billion COVID-19 vaccines have been administered so far.
          About a billion people have been vaccinated to one degree or another.

          That’s a pretty good sample size.”

          But it’s still experimental.

          What this all REALLY tells us is, though, that the FDA needs to go away. All the way away. All they do is get in the way of real solutions.

          When the rest of the world, including Canada and Mexico, can get drugs that our own government won’t let us get…and when we travel to Canada and get those treatments and respond well, and don’t die…tell me again what purpose the current-day FDA serves?

          None. None whatsoever, unless you count “getting in the way of getting things done” to be an actual “purpose”.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Future medical data should be intriguing.

            Wake me when they get to 7.1 billion or so and we’ll see if things finally get interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “Whether it is contracted of their own volition or not, you and I are stuck with most of the costs of hospitalizing them and caring for them.”

      I’ve said that about helmets for as long as I can remember–but notice how many states have given in to the motorcycle lobby on that.

      Just give my insurance company an out for being responsible for paying for the idiot two wheeler who CHOSE not to wear a helmet. That’s all I ask.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I have made no auto-related changes to my behavior because of the pandemic so I have nothing to continue. I never wore a mask except in the liquor store because they had actual “mask police” (idiotic state). I kept sanitizer in my car before the pandemic because gas pumps are disgusting. I traveled whenever I wished. So there is really nothing for me to keep doing. I’m just glad the rest of the country has come back to join me in living normally.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “gas pumps are disgusting”

      But the fake virus which has left 600,000 Americans dead gasping for air, isn’t.

      I’ll take my chances with the gas pumps.

      By the way, that ‘idiotic state’ you live in has decided that you don’t have the right to unwittingly hurt others with your Covid germs, which apparently aren’t disgusting to you because you can’t see them.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Only 6% of deaths have only COVID-19 listed in the death report, according to the CDC.

        https://abc17news.com/news/2020/09/02/cdc-data-shows-majority-of-people-who-died-from-covid-19-had-pre-existing-conditions/

        Fake virus… may be it is fake, since it is man made

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @slavuta – Pre-existing conditions in healthcare are called comorbidities. A person with a few concurrent diseases is more likely to die of any added disease. A diabetic with COPD is much more likely to be killed by a heart attack. That same patient is less likely to survive any treatable serious illness.

  • avatar
    loner

    What COVID driving behavior do I hope to continue beyond the pandemic?

    Curbside grocery shopping!

    Ordering groceries at Safeway is as easy as Amazon now. Point, click, drive to the store, and they put the groceries in my trunk.

    No more slogging through the store pushing a squeaky cart for a half hour, and cursing because I can’t find the refried beans!

  • avatar
    picard234

    I had a car delivered to my house, no dealership visit required. I felt fancy even though it’s just a KIA! Would definitely do that again.

  • avatar
    IH_Fever

    Nothing has changed. Close family members and coworkers had covid, and yet life went on as normal. The months a few of us worked in the office while all the others stayed home were the most productive I’ve had in years, no one there to bother us. Shopping is easier, just walk right in and out instead of waiting for someone to bring you the wrong toilet paper. Yeah, covid is real, militant anti maskers and maskhole karens are both annoying. Only thing that has changed is that we are more divided as a nation because something with a 99% survival rate was blown out of proportion for political gain.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “99% survival rate” Oh, I thought the “correct”number was 98%.

      I’m not going to debate the fatality rate but….

      The reason why the survival rate is so high is because measures have (for the most part) worked in reducing the infection rate which has reduced the burden on Healthcare systems.

      Imagine the death rate without masks, social distancing, travel restrictions etc.

      We had a brief taste of it in Italy and even New York at the start and currently in India.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    “I’ve talked to folks who say they will continue to mask up, at least some of the time, because masking up has not only helped keep them COVID-free but also helped them avoid colds and the flu.”

    Ummm…that’s not the purpose of the masks.

    The masks help keep the spittle of others from leaving their immediate area.

    Masks do not prevent the spittle of unmasked people from entering your mucus membranes. Unmasked people, should they have a viral infection, can still emit such spittle and other bodily fluids that can find their way to you.

    Your eyeballs are a huge receptor of such stuff.

    I really, really wish people would understand the world in which they live, instead of spreading such blatant misinformation and then judge others for not following their misinformation.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I read that there will be a segment gung-ho to go back to normal. A similar sized segment will remain ultracautious. The bulk will start out moderately cautious and adjust based upon what they see.
      Ironically, it mimics how politics are. There’s always a fringe on either end with the bulk of the populace sitting in the moderate middle.

  • avatar

    Not watching TV News anymore. Not watching new Hollywood movies anymore.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I should answer the question, “What Auto-Related Pandemic Behavior Will Stay With You?”

    I stopped taking long multi-day road trips to other parts of BC or elsewhere. That’s really my only pandemic driving behavior change. I’ll resume those trips eventually.
    I spend a lot of time in the backcountry but that was happening anyway. The pandemic just accelerated my timelines.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • SCE to AUX: Options such as shopping at a different dealer, or for a different vehicle, or not at all. Nobody is...
  • Flipper35: When I got married my wife had a 98 sedan. When we sold it at 135k miles we had replaced brakes and an...
  • dukeisduke: Knowing that there’s the hookup between Mitsubishi and Renault and Nissan, it makes sense that they...
  • FreedMike: You forgot the comma between “there” and “folks.” It’s too rich when someone...
  • indi500fan: What were the loopholes? My Cruze Eco did 35mpg all the time and 40 when I nursed it. And that was a 2800...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber