By on May 19, 2021

Ford F-150 Lightning

Lightning does strike twice, apparently, but perhaps not in quite the same way each time.

The Ford F-150 Lightning was once a hi-po street rod with power coming from a V8 engine. Now, however, the truck is all-electric.

We teased it last week, and President Joe Biden got to drive it yesterday, even breaking the embargo, and now it’s here.

The obvious name pun may be eye-rolling but the specs are not.

Ford is touting up to 563 horsepower and 775 lb-ft of torque — what the company says is the most torque ever offered by an F-150 — from an inboard front and rear transverse dual-motor setup. Four-wheel drive is standard.

Ford F-150 Lightning

There will be standard and extended-range lithium-ion batteries, with the standard battery making 426 horsepower and 775 lb-ft. The rear suspension is independent and the batteries are protected by skid plates.

Ford F-150 Lightning

The truck will come in SuperCrew configuration with a 5.5-foot bed. DC fast charging from 10 to 80 percent will take place as in little as 41 minutes, with standard charging taking between 10 and 19 hours depending on charger type and battery type.

Ford F-150 Lightning

Ford is targeting 230 miles of range with the standard battery and 300 with the extended-range. Sixty from zero should arrive in the mid-4-second-range with the extended-range battery, and the maximum towing capacity is listed at 10,000 pounds, again with the extended-range battery — in this case, with the addition of a max towing package. The truck will also offer a feature that helps drivers line up trailer hitches by assisting with throttle, brake, and steering inputs.

Ford F-150 Lightning

This truck might be the only one on the road with a “frunk” that has electrical outlets, UBS ports, and a drainable floor. It can also use onboard power to supply charge externally — Ford claims it could even power a home during a blackout. Over-the-air updates will keep the Lightning’s software current, and it will have Ford’s BlueCruise semi-autonomous driving aid. The FordPass app can be used to help drivers find the nearest charger, and Sync 4A infotainment will be part of the package. Buyers will also be able to use their phone as a key.

Ford F-150 Lightning

The next version of the Lightning goes on sale at about 2,300 Ford stores next spring, though you can reserve yours for $100 today. Four trims will be available, with the base work-truck starting at $39,974 and the mid-trim XLT at $52,974. Those prices don’t include destination.

[Images: Ford]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

191 Comments on “Electric Ford Lightning Finally Strikes...”


  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Those are incredibly reasonable prices, they’re going to have a million reservations within 24 hours. They will never be able to build enough of these things to meet demand.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      $53k for a severely compromised truck with a horrible range and even worse when doing truck things? Who would want that?

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        People spend 53k on gas powered trucks every day and all they do is drive them to work, never tow anything and rarely put anything significant in the bed. They’re life style vehicles for a lot of people – for the life you wish you had. An electric truck with instant torque, what looks like the most advanced tech and no compromises around town – it will sell.
        Why do people buy Tesla Model 3’s? Wouldn’t a Camry be just as good, a longer range, cheaper and quicker to fill up? But that’s not the point. I’m shocked at the low prices Ford is quoting. Dealers will mark them up.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          People buy compliance vehicles like this to present an image. It’s virtue signaling. It’s a fashion accessory.

          But if people buy trucks as you say they so, why does Ford always make the F150 more and more capable (well at least on paper)?

          Ford could have done great things with this truck but they phoned this in, just like the Mach E. An F150 with some electric motors in place of the engine is not very compelling. Especially when you consider the very problematic Electrify America charging network, the awful range unloaded and the downright horrendous range when using it as a truck.

          Anyone with a boat will have to buy two trucks. One for around town that’s electric and has a horrible range and one that is gas for taking trips. What a waste.

          • 0 avatar
            Imagefont

            EBFlex. You’re not a fan of Ford, frankly neither am I but you’ve got a vendetta. I wouldn’t expect you to like it and that’s perfectly okay. But ALL electric vehicles are just regular vehicles designed to hold a big battery and electric motors. And it’s not that simple of course, there are a few other minor details.
            This appears to be a fully realized vehicle that’s coming to market soon. Like all trucks it’s a brick, I wasn’t expecting a 500 mile range – because, physics. But imagine this for use around town, a commercial zero emission vehicle, no idling, a city government work truck. The price is right and it makes financial sense. The market for these exists and is just waiting for delivery.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ This appears to be a fully realized vehicle that’s coming to market soon.”

            Agree to disagree. It’s a compliance vehicle and a severely compromised one at that. It’s clear Ford didn’t spend a lot of time or money on this. An Escape Mach E interior attached to an F150 that has a powertrain swap.

            There isn’t a market for EVs because they are not ready for prime time. EVs make up about 2% of the market. That’s why you don’t see Ford or others investing real time and money into these things. They are cobbled together

          • 0 avatar
            Ol Shel

            YES! Any time someone tries to do something less destructive, they’re VIRTUE SIGNALING. If they were honest, they’d proudly proclaim that they want to be as destructive as possible, like you.

            On the other hand, the Cons never virtue signal, with their Dr Seuss protests, pretending to follow Jesus, wearing Realtree…

          • 0 avatar
            RSF

            Imagefont I don’t agree with EBFlex always, but he’s dead on right here about this truck. I’ll stick with my gas F150 and nearly 700 miles of range.

          • 0 avatar
            ttacgreg

            A PHEV version makes tons of sense.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ A PHEV version makes tons of sense”

            That would have been a FAR better route to go. Virtually all the benefits of an electric without the severe compromises.

            Had Ford done that, this truck would have been an instant success. Instead they chose the route that didn’t require much work or thinking.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Ford is making a PHEV version of the F-150, as well.

            Ford’ll sell you whatever you want. Money is still green regardless of the drivetrain.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “It’s virtue signaling”

            Let me go out on a limb and guess that you have zero days downrange during the last 20+ years of warfare we have been engaged in throught a region of the world that is known for producing oil.

            Maybe someone that has some time in all that wants to signal that they have had enough of that BS and would assume their kids not spend a significant chunk of time getting shot at over there like they and their father before them did.

            Or maybe they just like the specs and the lower maintenance and cost to fuel combined with the competetive with the ICE versions pricing make it a compelling vehicle for their individual use case.

            As to sales numbers, they didn’t get silly with it…It is an F150 that happens to have a different powertrain. Of course it will sell.

            I do wish one could get it old school Lightning style…standard cab, short box. The AWD and IRS with a little SVT magic sprinkled on it could have been interesting. Even with the batteries it would probably be close to the Hellcats’ weight and the handling could be similar since the later also corners like a truck.

        • 0 avatar
          RSF

          I’m sure it will sell, but it’s less practical than a Camry. 300 miles of max range is a joke.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Is 300 miles of range still a joke if you start every morning with a full charge, and never have to stop for gas?

            For a lot of people, that will cover their needs. And Ford will still sell you an old-fashioned ICE vehicle and oil companies will continue to f*ck with your wallet if your driving pattern doesn’t fit within that envelope.

            I don’t know your circumstances, but 300 miles of range is just fine for me — except when I’m towing my travel trailer (which takes 50% of my range on my ICE truck). The tri-motor Tesla Cybetrtuck has an edge here (500+ marketing mile range, which gives it a longer range than my 450-mile ICE truck). But, if I didn’t have the TT, the F-150 Lightning XLT would do everything I need!

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ Is 300 miles of range still a joke if you start every morning with a full charge, and never have to stop for gas?”

            Yes. Absolutely is when you consider a gasoline F150 has a max range of over 700 miles. I’ll take 15-20 minutes of refueling to travel over 1400 miles versus hours upon hours of charging to go the same distance

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “I’ll take 15-20 minutes of refueling to travel over 1400 miles versus hours upon hours of charging to go the same distance”

            Which eats more of your time: the extra ~2 hours to charge on a 1400-mile roundtrip that you take twice a year, or the weekly 20-minute detour to and stop at the gas station that you just get to skip entirely with an EV?

            Everyone thinks about the very occasional long trip and forgets to think about everyday life, where EVs are a time saver.

          • 0 avatar
            Rocket

            A joke for whom? You maybe, but not for a lot of people. Besides, if the patent is any indication, the optional range extender will be along soon enough.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            “Everyone thinks about the very occasional long trip and forgets to think about everyday life, where EVs are a time saver.”

            That is because:

            1) My time is much more precious on a road trip when I might have hundreds of miles to go that day and small kids screaming at me from the back seat. The difference between a 5 minute and a 60 minute refuel is enormous.

            2) There is a gas station (or 10) along my route to every conceivable errand or my office. I can schedule a fill up at my convenience and spend 5 minutes doing so (not 20).

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I suppose that’s a difference between suburbs and city.

            There are three gas stations within 3 miles of my house, and the only one that is along a route I regularly use has prices that are 30c/gal higher than market because it’s the only gas near a very rich neighborhood. And another of the stations has a bit of a stabby atmosphere.

            In general, the land here is too valuable to use for gas stations. So I do have to go a bit out of my way for gas, and it usually takes me around 20 minutes counting both the trip and the time at the station.

          • 0 avatar
            David

            I don’t understand all the complaints about range. Some people need 750 miles of range, but they are few and Ford offers them multiple drivetrain choices. When I lived in Colorado, my 1985 Grand Wagoneer (with the 5.9L V-8) only got 9-12 mpg. This meant 240 miles of range under best-case conditions. Lots of mountain driving at altitude? 175 miles of range. Felt like I constantly had to stop for fuel.

        • 0 avatar
          RangerM

          “People spend 53k on gas powered trucks every day and all they do is……”

          Probably true for some. For most (like me) who can’t afford another vehicle to make up for the shortcomings, an F150 serves those duties as well as being the Family Truckster. It also has to be prepared and ready to travel when something comes up (at inconvenient times).

          The problem with pure electric vehicles (as sole transportation) is they simply can’t be (as close to) 100% ready/available as much a gasoline vehicle.

          I have no doubt that electric vehicles are the future, but I don’t believe they’re the present (as much as people think) without a substantial advance in battery technology and charging infrastructure.

      • 0 avatar
        shipping96

        You are nothing if not predictable.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          The truth usually is. Unless you’re a liberal

          • 0 avatar
            Imagefont

            A liberal? So you really want to talk about politics? But I don’t think you’re well equipped.
            Wrong website anyway. Go over to circle-jerk news and have yourself a big serving of confirmation bias if that’s your thing. Make you feel good.

          • 0 avatar
            ttacgreg

            Nice broad brush prejudice there. You reveal yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            List of things EBFlex has irrational hate for:

            Ford
            Liberals

            Feel free to add to what feels like a strangely short list. I’m sure people here can build that out a bit more.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Guy who hates Ford hates New Ford Truck. Tune it at 11 for details.

        Yes, that pricing is solid. It should sell well at that price. When are the other electric trucks due?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Are you trying to describe the Lightning? Because you just described the 10-mpg TRX from your favorite manufacturer. But it costs $70K and you don’t even get a frunk or onboard power.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert.Walter

        Maybe not to you but these trucks will sell like hot cakes.

      • 0 avatar
        RangerM

        According to Ford (depending if you have the standard or extended version) the charging times are:

        15%-100% using the standard 32-amp/240V mobile charger: 14/19 hours
        15%-100% using the optional 48-amp/240V mobile charger: 10/13 hours
        15%-100% using the 80-amp Ford Charge Station Pro: 10/8 hours
        15%-80% using a 150-kW Level 3 fast charger: 44/41 minutes

        This truck isn’t for me, even though I have a garage large enough for it.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike Beranek

        The US is filled with pickup trucks that don’t do truck things. Right now at work, over half the vehicles in our employee lot are pickups, and all they do is drive one person to work- which is not a “truck thing”.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          The assumption is that every time you see a truck that isn’t doing a ‘truck thing’, that it never does a ‘truck thing’.

          This vehicle is excluded from EVER doing truck things, at least with the way things are now.

          Camping with no trailer into the mountains 150 miles away? Pushing it, probably not.

          Towing a boat 1 hour away from home (65 miles)? Really pushing your luck without the extended range. Not much overhead left.

          Towing a travel trailer 1 hour from home? Really pushing it even with extended range.

          It would be fine for going to home depot though. I was hoping they were going to make something like the old lightning which would be stupid and fun and maybe interesting because no one expected that to tow a trailer. Ford made this seem like a regular truck but it’s really handicapped for doing family truck things.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        EBFlex-

        Good lord, your myopia is epic.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “ EBFlex-

          Good lord, your myopia is epic.”

          Nah just common sense observations of real world drawbacks to this compliance vehicle

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            It’s funny what passes for “common sense” these days.

            Rather than just respond with *just* a snarky comeback, let me state my own use case which matches up nicely with the Lightning. Whether or not you believe that I am not alone in this is, well, remains to be seen.

            230 mile range. This works fine for me. I want a truck for local runs to support my hobbies and my home.

            Can power your house. An equivalent Tesla Powerwall (to use one example) costs about $7K. Plus, if the Lightning runs down and the blackout is local, I can actually go out and shop for some power. How cool is that?

            Charge time. Not the best for level 2 but, again, I can easily manage with my limited needs. I view any fast charging on the road as a bonus. Even better since my use case is charging at home, my planned solar panel installation means I can, probably, drive my needed miles for very little money (assuming that my state will institute and electric vehicle fee to recover the lost gas tax, I’m fine with that).

            Price – Even without the tax incentive, it’s competitive with other pickups in its class for my intended use.

            Virtue signaling. WTF is that except for some idiotic dog whistle you trot out because you feel threatened, for what, I can’t seem to figure out. I will say that not having to give so much money to oil producers does appeal, so I eill grant that there is an emotional component.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Professional users, who know their rather stable usage pattern very well, and don’t need more range, may find it exactly what they want. At least once/if it proves itself reliability wise.

        Most “civilians” who buy crewcab pickups, do so specifically because they are the type who insists on their vehicle covering every conceivable eventuality, no matter how unlikely. For them, the range, especially so under load, will forever remain a showstopper.

      • 0 avatar
        kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

        Literally … tens of thousands of mall crawling soccer moms and ‘gotta have a truck’ status symbol soccer dads. I live in oregon and see 80k trucks that have never seen a day of ”work” just hauling groceries and taking up 4 parking spots to protect their ‘baby’ …

        for a in town hauler this would not be bad .. but most haulers drive way longer than this .. so while I approve of EVs overall … this one is way out of its use category ..

        I *THINK** this is ford ‘gaming’ the EPA .. sell enough of them to the mall crowd to offset other vehicles and carbon taxes

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Those are incredibly reasonable prices, they’re going to have a million reservations within 24 hours. They will never be able to build enough of these things to meet demand.”

      Agree. I don’t think Ford will be able to build them fast enough initially. Be interesting to know what they forecasted for sales.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        The price is reasonable and municipal fleets will buy these up. A 230 – 300 mile range (368 – 480 km) range is all you’ll need in town. I can see police forces buying these.

        I personally would want more range since I tend to spend a lot of time in remote areas but this will go further than my motorcycle.

        Fuel is just a form of energy storage, just like batteries. If it performs well and meets my needs at a cost I can afford, I don’t care how the energy is stored and whether it feeds a motor or an engine.

    • 0 avatar
      NigelShiftright

      “incredibly reasonable”

      I will contribute $100 to the favorite charity of the first person who can document one of these being sold for less than $42K before tax&tag.

      Personally it’s more vehicle than I would ever need, but I do have a 1/3 mile steep driveway which gets about 50-70 total inches of snow every winter. Something like an electric Subaru Forester would definitely get my attention as a daily driver.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “a million reservations within 24 hours.”

      Jim Farley is that you?

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This is like a bad joke. Range is awful, recharge times are very long, and priced way too high for what is effectively an F150 with the powertrain removed and an android tablet stuck to the dash with double sided tape.

    And no mention of the fake steering wheel option that they let Jo Jo play with the other day when he didn’t drive it?

    • 0 avatar
      shipping96

      Jokes on you. They will sell as many as they can make. Glad I own Ford stock right now.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        I mean yeah. Why would you make something people won’t buy? Or overproduce something with minimal sales? And if it’s anything like the Bronco you’re going to have to hold on to that stock for a long time.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          This is the *entire* problem with you and people who think (if you can call it that) like you:

          You think only your needs and wants have any standing. It’s a sort of self-delusional sensitivity to the ugly thought that you might be wrong. It burns you so badly that all you can do is act out, repeatedly.

          Get help, man.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        Maybe, but that’s what they said about the Ranger and Bronco which are hardly moving.
        “The truck will come in SuperCrew configuration with a 5.5-foot bed.” = soccer mom.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “range is awful”

      “On average, Americans drive 29.2 miles per day, making two trips with an average total duration of 46 minutes. This and other revealing data are the results of a groundbreaking study currently underway by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety and the Urban Institute”

      For most people, you could easily go more than a week without a charge.

      • 0 avatar
        RSF

        Lou_BC except for the days that you need to actually use the truck to carry something or take a trip somewhere. For that you need another truck.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @RSF- seriously?

          Anyone needed to cover long distances towing isn’t going to buy this and a second truck to tow….unless they are in the market for 2 rigs. I’d buy this as a second rig any day over the current choice of EV’s out there.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Average American drives average Honda Accord to the average job at average Home depot. Person who needs f150 drives more than that.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Fully disagree. I see a large market for these, from urban cowboys to local tradesmen. Is it going to lug my boat to the lake 100 miles away and back? Possibly not. But for the folks who use their trucks locally on a daily basis, it’s going to be a great option.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree, this is something which should have been pursued ten years ago instead of things like the Leaf, Volt etc. One could make the argument Tesla should have pursued a small truck as opposed to the Model S at the time, but as a then fledgling company it may not have made as much sense.

        • 0 avatar
          Alex Mackinnon

          You don’t just go straight from Model T to Charger Hellcat.

          The battery in the Volt was about $20K when it first came out, for 16kWh.

          We don’t know what the Lightning has, but it’s probably upwards of 150 kWh. In 2011, that would put the battery pack at about $200K.

          There’s a reason the Volt and Leaf didn’t go very far.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            My point is the same earlier technology could have been successful, or at least less embarrassing, in truck/fleet/commercial use first.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The batteries are just now getting to the point where a giant honking one for a giant honking truck makes sense at a TCO level.

            I think everyone’s always been aware that electric trucks would be fantastic for fleet use—but everyone’s also aware that the numbers have to pencil for fleets and that fleets are not going to buy based on emotion or on a hazy idea of green cred. It’s not a coincidence that everyone and their mother is suddenly coming out with electric trucks right now.

      • 0 avatar
        khory

        Why drop big money on a truck that can’t haul your stuff though? Even if 90% of your use is local, people can’t just buy a second truck to cover the other 10%.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I did cringe a tiny bit with Biden behind the wheel of a truck. It brought back memories of this . . . .
      https://unshootables.com/donald-trump-behind-the-wheel-of-a-truck-and-internet-photoshop-battle-begins/

      And your derisive name calling once again reveals who you are.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “I did cringe a tiny bit with Biden behind the wheel of a truck. It brought back memories of this . . . .”

        None can touch Michael Dukakis driving an Abrams Tank. That is the Grandaddy of all Presidential Campaign driving lunacy.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        He did not drive it. It was set with dual controls for him

        https://youtu.be/SObtBUTfvLM?t=299

        • 0 avatar
          spookiness

          The agent was holding on to a SLR camera that was sitting on the dash. You can clearly see in subsequent scenes of the full video that there is no second wheel.

          • 0 avatar
            CKNSLS Sierra SLT

            It’s just more non-sense from slavuta. It makes ZERO DIFFERENCE whether he was driving (he was) or not.

            Slavuta just needs to crawl back in to his hole.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            aga, camera. With the same curvature, visual texture, shade and hand movement. Look at the driver window shape and look at passenger window shape. Passenger window trim for some reason goes backwards. Of course it is not. This is the 5 o’clock part of the steering wheel.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            In fact, this is not even first mule with 2 wheels

            https://icdn-4.motor1.com/images/mgl/ly47w/s1/toyota-research-institute-autonomous-test-mule.jpg

            And driving schools have these things. And duplicate pedals

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      You should picket in front of Ford dealers. It would be funny to watch people’s reactions to you.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I can’t believe I’m saying this but I think the front looks nice. I guess pickup truck design generally has no place to go but up. But nice work. EBFlex has a point, 230 miles of range is going to drop pretty quick when towing, in cold weather, etc. But I think that attitude fails to take into account another painful reality….there just aren’t that many people doing truck things with their trucks. Pickups are commuters and family haulers for most owners. I don’t think buyers are going to worry too much about that 1 in 1000 trip where they might actually need a truck. This electric option will be a hit with those people who are ready to go electric. At least all the pretend cowboys can get a little green cred when driving their oversized underworked rigs to Starbucks.

    The real question is, will d’bags in pickup trucks block the chargers needed by the new electric trucks. I can’t wait to that YouTube video.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Does it matter if I only do “truck” things a few times a year? Say I have a boat/trailer that weighs 4500-5000 pounds. What are my options? Full size SUVs and pickups. Throw the V8 Grand Cherokee in there too. I tow that boat around town but also take trips with it too (250 mile trips one way)

      Now I have to buy an entirely separate vehicle because I’m not spending an entire day in the car driving and recharging when I can just get a truck with a 23-25 gallon gas tank and not have to stop once for gas.

      This non-truck is a compliance vehicle and nothing more. And a very poor effort by Ford. This is much worse than the fake Mustang SUV built on the Escape platform.

      And no fog lights? Really Ford?

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        If it weighs 4-5000 lbs, you can tow it with your new Hyundai Santa Cruz. All these guys driving trucks for that that one big thing they had to carry that one time is like framing a house with a sledge hammer.

        • 0 avatar
          CKNSLS Sierra SLT

          thegamper-
          I can always tell those who don’t tow anything when they say you can tow 5,000 pounds with a Hyundai Santa Cruz. On paper-Hyundai says so. In real life it’s a miserable tow. But Hyundai is not alone n being overly optimistic in their tow ratings. HINT-In many half-ton truck you will hit max payload well before max towing capability.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          @thegamper: in my experience at least- most people buy 1500 class trucks. They aspire to do some outdoorsy stuff a few times a year. People don’t get enough vacation that they can go camping all summer long. and it’s not just the boat. it’s the boat, and all the inflatable crap, and the cooler, and the dog, and your kids friend, etc etc.

          And the truck handles buying shrubs, bbq grilles, etc. better as well. This does make sense as a contractor vehicle though and light delivery. A good home depot rental vehicle if it ever comes in long bed too.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        Honda Passport can tow 5000 lbs too. I’m sure there is a whole list of reasonable vehicles that could.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Most people do not like to tow right at the limit of what the vehicle can handle. Well competent drivers anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          MoDo

          Those tow ratings are bunk. 5000lbs is A LOT of weight. A FWD V6 car based “SUV” might pull it across a parking lot but you’d be a fool to head out onto the road hitched to that kind of weight. My SUV has a “tow rating” of 7300lbs and I’ve been advised to not exceed 3200lbs or 20′ (even that would be white knuckle) as the wind will blow you off the road with a short wheel base SUV. 5000lbs is a strain even on a 1500 pick-up.

          • 0 avatar
            crtfour

            Agreed. I tow a 5,000 pound travel trailer and would not even consider towing it with anything crossover based, regardless of the tow rating. People can say what they will, but a pickup is definitely not overkill for towing these type of loads.

          • 0 avatar

            I tow with a pilot. So far only up to around 3500-4000lbs, but it did fine Don’t think it would have an issue towing 5k at all.
            I worked at boat dealer and RV dealers for years towed with lots of things, car based have limitations but they are fine.
            White knuckle is towing 10,000 lbs with a slant six halfton which I have done multiple times. Towing 5k with a 300 hp crossover with stability control is a walk in the park.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Towing 5k with a 300 hp crossover with stability control is a walk in the park.”

            You’ve either got more skill or more guts than me because there is no way I would tow a 5K full-frame trailer with a 5K capacity CUV for more than a couple miles. It isn’t the power that’s the issue, it is the trailer pushing me in cross winds or downhill.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Man, none of you have ever been to Europe, where it is routine to use plain ol’ cars (and not big ones) to tow 2000-3000 lb travel trailers. The rules are a bit different, granted. They limit trailer towers to 50 or 62 mph depending on road, and they enforce that zealously. They ban trailers from some bridges that have the worst crosswinds. But if you are aware of the limits using a big American-market crossover is just fine. I’d have no hesitation hooking up a 3500 lb. trailer (the rating) to my Highlander Hybrid, and then driving it at sane speeds in sane places.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “They ban trailers from some bridges that have the worst crosswinds”

            Getting certain places in Florida (like where my house is) without going over long bridges is pretty tricky.

            I expect they are also towing less distance in Europe. My house to Key Largo is the distance from Paris to Toulouse. My house to your house is Paris to Baghdad.

          • 0 avatar

            Well for me I have been towing things since I was like 14, so not that big of a deal. On several occasion in my youth I towed huge amounts on trailers with no brakes with old beat trucks so I’m not the guy doing 70MPH in the left lane with a trailer swaying behind me. I once towed a Hydarulic trailer that weighed 7k lbs empty with a 36′ house boat on top with no brakes behind an 85 F350 to a boatyard 15 miles away.
            Now if you have only ever towed with a 3/4 ton diesel in the modern era going back would would be tough. I remember when a boat dealer I was working at handed me the keys to the new 98 cummins shop truck, pulling 25′ boats was downright relaxing in comparison.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            YMMV obviously, but anytime I’ve towed at the weight limit (with minivans and full size vans) it has been an unpleasant experience and it is certainly nothing that I would voluntarily take part in.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yeah I have spent plenty of time in Europe. I saw a 69 Camaro of all things in Belgium towing a travel trailer. They are limited to a low speed on roads there. Sure you can, but you can drive a nail with a torque wrench too…but why?

            With respect to weight, that is important but so is the shape of the load. I towed a friend’s Mk III Supra on one of those heavy U-Haul car trailers across 2 states. You barely felt it was back there. Put my old travel trailer back there though that weighed roughly the same but had a much larger frontal area and was far more suseptible to crosswinds and I am greatful for all that wheelbase and mass pulling it.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Does it matter if I only do “truck” things a few times a year? Say I have a boat/trailer that weighs 4500-5000 pounds”

        If you bought a 4,500 – 5,000 lb boat or trailer and only use them a few times per year, you are wasting your money. Any pickup powered by anything purchased to tow a few times per year would also be a waste of money….

        Lame… truly lame.

        That’s one of the poorest excuses I’ve ever heard of to own a truck.

        I take that back, this is the lamest:

        “And no fog lights”

        Bwaaa ha ha ha ha…ROTFLMFAO

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Compliance vehicle would be something akin to the FIAT 500 electric or the parade of other electric vehicles sold only in select states where they need to sell the EV’s to…wait for it…comply with state laws. So far as I have read, this is a 50 state vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I for one would love to see how a pick up truck would look that is optimized as much as possible for aerodynamics. It might actually be nice looking.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I would think it would look something like 1997-2004 F150.

      • 0 avatar
        993cc

        The aerodynamics of this truck could be greatly improved if they sacrificed half of the frunk space to having a lower front. But then it would look different, so traditionally-minded buyer would stay away.

        For an example of a truck optimized for aerodynamics (given the constraints of the materials it’s built from), consider the CyberTruck. Or, better, don’t.

        I’d be curious to know how Canoo’s interpretation of a pickup does in a wind tunnel.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Pretty decent specs.

    Plus it makes the Mach-E look like the unimpressive, overpriced poorly named pregnant pig that it is.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I don’t personally get the appeal for anyone other than a fleet that never leaves town, but that price alone is going to sell thousands of these. I expected $10K higher.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I kinda hate V8s, despite owning one.

      I’m swapping my Sierra for an EV at the first opportunity. The tri-motor Tesla Cybertruck looks like a better fit for my needs, though, even though I like the F-150 Lightning.

      (It would be a toss-up, except that the top-trim Tesla truck is supposed to have a 500+ mile range — which bests the 450-mile range of my current truck. Towing will likely halve the range on the Tesla truck, as it currently does on my Sierra.)

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        Except there is no Tesla truck.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          There is a Tesla Truck. Letters are going out to deposit holders. Production is supposed to be 2021. The Model Y Casting production part of the Austin factory just started production and the first batches are headed to Fremont. Drones captured photos of the trucks leaving.

          • 0 avatar
            Imagefont

            Tesla Cybertruck is not a fully realized or designed vehicle. The blocky show car introduced years ago is not even street legal. They may eventually introduce some sort of truck, but it won’t be the stainless steel pyramid with the unbreakable broken window shown to the public. And as you know, production is perpetually scheduled for “later this year”, and it will still be later this year five years from now. Just like FSD, the Semi, the new Roadster (not new anymore), your solar shingles, your RoboTaxi that appreciates in value and earns you money while you sleep…
            When you see a prototype of a workable road legal Cybertruck, which will look very different from the ridiculous show car, you’ll know they’re actually working on it. As you know with Tesla, reservations and deposits – or paying up front for FSD that never materialized – means nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @imagefront: The final version looks like the prototype. At this point, it’s fully realized and the factory is under construction. Also, the vehicle’s design or construction would not get in the way of street legalization. And exactly what wasn’t streel legal about it? Nothing.

            ” And as you know, production is perpetually scheduled for “later this year”,”

            Like the Model S, the Model 3, the Model Y, the texas and berlin factories, and even the roof tiles have happened. If anything, there is a risk of the 4680 batteries not being ready.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      There are plenty of fleets that never leave town, and the moment this hits the market it will be far and away the best, most economical vehicle on the market for those fleets. Obviously anyone doing long-haul deliveries won’t want this, but if you’re buying a light-duty truck to do start-stop hits around town all day, five days a week, this will save you $5k a year on gas and has no engine maintenance.

      The 0-60 time on this is nothing more than a gimmick; Ford left the weekend toy to Hummer and the virtue signaling to Rivian, and came out with the best lunch pail truck there is. It’s frankly ingenious.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I don’t know how they are going to allocate capacity. If they can manage even reasonable reliability by EV standards, a 230-mile electric truck at $40K is going to be the best truck in the country for almost every day-use fleet overnight. Uptime will be high, maintenance expense will be low, and fuel costs will be in the cellar.

    They are going to have fleet buyers lined up out the door and down the street, regardless of how many or how few they sell to individuals.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      1. Where will they get so many batteries?
      2. By the time they start selling it, they will have to increase the price

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “Where will they get so many batteries?”

        That’s the question, isn’t it.

        I expected a lineup like this but without the work truck variant, and I expected that because I thought battery constraints would fix production capacity at a pretty low level.

      • 0 avatar
        RSF

        slavuta- also, where are we getting all the power to re-charge these batteries?

        • 0 avatar
          shipping96

          We don’t have a lack of utility power. However we do have a lack of peak power. If people charge during non peak hours it won’t be an issue. Perhaps peak/off-peak pricing for electricity will become more prevalent.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    An electric car would be more acceptable to me if it had normal dash/center console interface. I don’t like that computer screen, period. I don’t like electronic instrumentation.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      If you don’t like it, don’t buy it.

      The world will move on with or without you — but you can stay with the old stuff you like, if you want.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        IE the stuff that works. Enjoy getting 100 miles of range pulling a trailer or when it’s cold out. Those long recharge times will be fun for you too.

        Meanwhile I can fill my vehicle in 5 or so minutes and not have to worry about a 4 hour drive taking double that because of a stupid EV and the long recharge times. There’s a reason we went from
        electric vehicles to internal combustion. It was and is superior

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Moving behind, not moving on. Less range, less freedom, less control, more cheap electronics to break in the cabin. What’s the intended lifetime of one? Current trucks can be on the road 30+ years, can these?

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          28-cars-later: My experience and my understanding is that brushless motors have the capability to outlive any human.

          I think the real intended lifetime issue is probably battery tech since batteries do have lifetimes (although longer than you’d think with current control schemes). If you can retrofit batteries the lifespan shouldn’t be any more of an issue than anything else. Batteries may be expensive- but less regular maintenance costs.

    • 0 avatar
      Ol Shel

      Agreed. Pretty soon, we’ll have to wade through numerous menus to find the ‘Apply Brakes’ feature. Knobs and buttons worked great for most functions, but designers had to ‘improve’ things.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        LOL “hmmm let’s see how to apply the brakes”. So true.

        If you had told me decades ago that just a simple on off switch function would be replaced by some multi option, multi selection process I would’ve told you you’re nuts, because in the future technology was going to make life so convenient. Riiiight.

        I still haven’t figured out how to simply shut off the audio/radio/infobullcrap/entertainment system on my current generation Miata. There’s always some feed lurking in the background is going to hook me into a radio station or the music in my phone. The base default assumption is I want something blaring out of my speakers in my car, and I can’t figure out how to override that basic assumption.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Go drive a Tesla (or any EV), and you will be able to criticize the real issues — rather than just make up things to grouse about.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Ford did a heck of job with this truck and the price is is a LOT lower than I would have expected. For us guys that leave town every weekend with a boat, camper, snowmobile trailer etc. hooked to back this would never work but for fleet sales they are almost a no brainer. For people with summer homes where they have the ability to charge once they reach their destination these trucks could work in the summer. Winter, things may get a little dicey.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      It doesn’t have to be all things to all people to be a successful product.

      For those whose driving pattern fits into the vehicle’s limitations, it will save them money, maintenance, fuel, and time.

      And, for everyone else, Ford will be happy to sell them a different F-series truck which meets their requirements.

      Seems like a good thing all around.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “It doesn’t have to be all things to all people to be a successful product.”

        Not yet, but if everything is going to become an EV in 10 years then it will.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @ajla:

          “Not yet, but if everything is going to become an EV in 10 years then it will.”

          Keep in mind the state of the EV art will advance considerably in the next few years (heck, look back at what has happened in the last 10 years – the progress is absolutely remarkable).

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            “Keep in mind the state of the EV art will advance considerably in the next few years (heck, look back at what has happened in the last 10 years – the progress is absolutely remarkable).”

            That *may* come to pass, but extrapolating trends into the future is dangerous. Especially when something like a 2021 Model S isn’t so terribly different than a 2012. Sure, it can advertise a longer range because of a bigger battery, but not a paradigm shifting change.

            I’d much prefer to have the 500 mile EVs with 10 min recharge times already on sale before things like gas car bans start getting tossed around.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “I’d much prefer to have the 500 mile EVs with 10 min recharge times already on sale before things like gas car bans start getting tossed around.”

            How about Truth, Justice, and the American Way?

            Oh yeah Americans are no longer running the show.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            “How about Truth, Justice, and the American Way?”

            I wish I could still bring myself to hope like that.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            A 2021 Model S has substantially better specs than a 2012 (100+ miles extra range and a couple seconds faster to 60 across the lineup), but, more importantly, it’s tens of thousands of dollars cheaper to manufacture per unit. Tesla was losing money on every car in 2012 and now the S is a cash cow for them.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @dal,

            Not being snarky because I genuinely don’t know, but how much of that savings is due to buying components and battery cells at scale vs. actual technological breakthroughs?

            Tesla was a lot smaller company in 2012 than they are now.

            I also don’t consider incrementally adding more batteries and motors to improve acceleration and range to be the kind of improvements required to get EVs to mass acceptance and ICEs banned.

            Maybe a 400 mile Tesla with hour long recharge times can cover 95% of typical use cases for 95% of people, but once the word “ban” is put in play, it better cover 100%.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @jack:

            I wouldn’t say the Model S is the best example – it was an expensive, cutting-edge vehicle when it came out. The range should have been good based on the price.

            I think cheaper EVs are a better yardstick. Think of the cheaper EV models that were around +/- 10 years ago – the Leaf, the Focus Electric, and the Fiat 500 EV. All of them had terrible range – around 100 miles, if memory serves. Today, you can buy a new Leaf or Bolt with about 250 miles of range for about $30,000.

            That’s the kind of progress I’m talking about.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Mike,

            I agree that the cost has come way down on tolerable EVs. But that isn’t what’s going to make the difference to holdouts like me.

            I’m more interested in the top of the range, because that’s the tech that trickles down eventually. And the fact is that with the possible exception of the Taycan, it’s hard to buy any EV anywhere in 2021 that’s appreciably better in range and recharging time than a 2012 Model S.

            It won’t matter how cheap 250 mile EVs become if they can’t solve the range/recharging time conundrum. There are always going to be needs that can’t be met with hour long stops every couple hundred miles. And to assume there will be a breakthrough coming soon sounds a lot like the fusion power people. Hope, but verify. That’s (part of) why I’m so against the idea of ICE bans.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The improvement in Model S manufacturing cost is mostly because Tesla is now manufacturing its own cells using technology that is considerably superior to what was available to any battery manufacturer a decade ago. And that trend is going to continue, and pretty quickly. We’re at somewhere around $150/kWh now, for big OEMs other than Tesla. Around $100/kWh, we’ll start seeing EVs have TCO parity with ICE cars for consumers. At $70/kWh, EVs will be cheaper to purchase, not even counting their operating cost advantage.

            And I wish everyone would stop pretending that they spend all their time on the road doing thousand-mile trips. You aren’t all hotshot drivers with Cummins Ram 3500s. The tradeoff is going to be that long trips get a bit slower in exchange for lower cost and more convenience in the vast majority of daily driving, and that’s going to be fine for 95% of the buyers. Our family has recently been taking one 2000-mile and several 800-mile round trips annually, and we’ll be able to live with the charging stops just fine.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “and that’s going to be fine for 95% of the buyers.”

            5% of the market is still a lot of people. I also think you’re over-estimating how much inconvience and habit-changing nonenthusiat people are willing to put up with when it comes to transportation.
            However, manufacturers and governments seem to recognize the issue and eventually level 3 chargers will be nearly as numerous as fuel pumps.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I’ve personally driven 8 trips of at least 1000 miles round trip in the last year.

            Most have been either with my family or with my truck towing something.

            No, I’m not a hotshotter, but the ability to drive a long way without lengthy stops is a very important thing to me, and pretending that no longer being able to do so won’t affect purchase decisions and lead to resentment if/when ICEs are banned is IMO misguided.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            By 2030, L3 chargers are going to be everywhere. The utility companies will subsidize the transmission facilities, and once you have those the chargers themselves are incredibly cheap to install and will consistently generate profits. Charging your car enroute will be just as easy as stopping at a gas station is today (or easier, as there will be L3 chargers at places where you are making non-gas stops); it will just take longer.

            My own kids desperately want some time out of the seat after about three hours, or 210-240 miles, of driving. This is why 300 miles of range is a magic number. I really won’t mind stopping for 45 minutes to charge to 80%.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Fleets care about price. A fleet F150 is $33k. This is thousands more, unproven, subject to the same low quality standards as proper F150s and not serviceable by local government shops.

      With all the issues agencies have had with the Hybrid Explorer they will not buy this sorry excuse for an EV truck.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Fleets care about TCO, not purchase price. For any but the least intensive users this will win in TCO due to lower fuel and maintenance costs. And why wouldn’t shops learn to service these? EVs are the fleet vehicles of the future and even the slowest fleet manager can grasp that by now after seeing how incredibly cheap Bolts have been for governments to run.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Completely wrong. Fleets care about purchase price and purchase price only. If total cost to own was a consideration, fleets would buy something other than Ford vehicles.

          But they don’t. Because Ford is very cheap to buy. But then they get nickel and dimed all throughout its life.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Found the person that has never been a fleet manager but has certainly spent plenty of time as a volunteer Stellantis salesman.

            Every fleet planning report I’ve ever seen has focused on lifecycle cost as the bottom-line number.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            The fleets that ONLY care about purchase price are one’s that know the trucks they buy will be completely destroyed during their life cycle. There aren’t too many fleets that work on that premise.

            Oh and yes, another dumb statement made by someone blinded by hate.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            If fleets only cared about purchase price then they would be full of RAM pickups not Fords and Chevys. But they don’t they care about TCO and Uptime.

      • 0 avatar
        shipping96

        Fleets also care about TOTAL costs and electric vehicles have a clear advantage in operating cost. Another swing and a miss, but thanks for bringing up another advantage of electric vehicles.

  • avatar
    Otozon3

    I must say it has decent tech features that look promising. But they removed the powertrain and I think it’s priced way too high.

    I have a diesel-powered F-150 and it’s still running great. Modern-day F-150s can safely pull a trailer that weighs around 5,000 to 8,000 pounds with the help of the towing gears like the one I bought from 4WheelOnline.

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    Enjoyed this thread except for Cliff Clavin chiming in on things that support his delusional worldview.

    Ps. I’m kinda thinking that Tesla won’t exist independently in 10 years.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Vehicular choice is also a fashion statement for some buyers.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I don’t think people will buy this Lightning for truck stuff any more than anyone bought the original Lightning to do truck stuff. Or the buyers of the Ram SRT-10 and GMC Syclone for that matter.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    As someone who owns a 1/2 ton pickup for the purpose of pulling an Airstream travel trailer (like the one in the photo), I have to laugh at this. One of the big issues for travel trailer owners who want to move beyond RV parks that have “Full hookups” (i.e. 50 amps of electricity at each parking space plus water and sewer), is electricity. The trailer comes equipped with 2 12-volt batteries, which are fine for running the lights and the water pump. But, if you’re in cold weather and want to run the propane heating system, the blower that circulates the heated air will take down your batteries in a few nights. So lots of RVers have — wait for it — portable generators . . . powered by gasoline or propane. I kinda doubt that my little 2kw Honda generator is going to recharge the Lightning in any less than a month of Sundays.

    For a pickup truck as a tow vehicle, the most important spec is the payload, not the tow rating. That’s because the trailer puts weight on the tow vehicle . . . in the case of the Airstream in the photo, over 1,000 lbs. No mention of that in this description. My truck has a payload of 1900 lbs. which is about right for my 27 foot trailer when you figure the weight of passengers, dogs and stuff in the bed. It also gets between 11 and 13 mpg towing, which works out to a useful range of about 250 miles.

    I will concede that hot rod pickups like the prior Lightning are sort of a joke, but this one is no better.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      By your “if it can’t tow what I need it to, it’s a joke” logic, a F-150 with the base motor would also be a joke.

      Different buyers have different needs. The ones who need something that will tow an Airstream will buy a different truck. But there are plenty of folks – the vast majority, I’d argue – who just use these to get around town in, and throw stuff in the back of from time to time.

      For those folks, YOUR pickup might be a joke because it won’t do 60 in under five seconds. and can’t be filled up in your garage every night.

      Different strokes for different folks, you know?

    • 0 avatar

      Depends on how much driving range you need. The truck battery would power the airstream for a long time if you camp within a reasonable distance of high power DC chargers. While I don’t think it will work for a lot of campers it will for some.

      I mean I’m less than 100 miles from a number of state parks with RV sites and no hookups. I could go to the beach still have plenty of power to run the truck and camper for a few days, than grab dinner at the outlet mall with destination chargers and be all set for the ride home.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      The payload (at least for the configuration in the photos) appears to be 1800 lb.

      Note the “onboard scales” graphic.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    And, so, the Great Experiment begins. I think this will be a hit, particularly at that price. And I think the people who buy these will come to love them. I mean, what’s not to like about a four-door pickup that can hit 60 in under five seconds?

    Is the range a bit low? If you’re a road warrior, maybe. If you’re just using something to get back and forth from work, and you have a garage to park it in at night, it’s not an issue at all. Just plug it in every night.

    Heck, I’m not a truck guy by any means, but I’d check one out.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Jeebus Ford, I stare at a big screen all day I don’t want to stare at another one in my truck.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    This is awesome, now a subset of F150 drivers can look at me in my Prius and sneer that I am a fossil fuel burning gas hog, polluting the planet. And I can look back at them and sneer that they just virtue signaling Eco weenies. LOL

  • avatar

    Seems really well thought out actually. If it weren’t for the fact I drive fairly long distance regularly for work this would work fine for me.
    Weekend warrior mode There are dozens of garden centers lumber yards etc with in 10 mile of my house so no issue.
    My boats are all used within about a 50 mile range of my house so no issue
    80% of my camping is done with in 100 miles of my house so small issue with the other 20% of the time.
    120 miles a day commute, no issue.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “120 miles a day commute, no issue”

      I’d at least wait to see how Ford’s battery holds up before cycling it that deep every day. Especially on the standard range version.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        That could actually be the ideal use case to maximize battery life.

        Cycle life doesn’t tell the whole story with lithium batteries. There are a few other factors. Lithium batteries really don’t like to spend time at the extremes of their capacity range, especially not the low extreme. But within the middle range where they are happiest (which is about 30% to 80% capacity) they actually benefit from being used. So if this truck has a feature that allows you to cap charge under normal circumstances at, say, 85% (my Bolt has this feature), and you then discharge the battery to 35% or 30% on your daily commute and charge it back to 85% at night, you will get a lot of lifespan out of the battery, far more than somebody who regularly does 100% to 0% cycles or spends a bunch of time at 100%.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          120 miles a day on a 230 mile range would be a 100%/47% or 80%/27% every day. That’s better than sitting at 100% all the time or going 100%/2%, but I’ve never seen where usage that would be optimal for battery life.

          accubattery.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360016286793-Re-
          Modeling-of-Lithium-Ion-Battery-
          Degradation-for-Cell-Life-Assessment

  • avatar
    ajla

    “with the base work-truck starting at $39,974 and the mid-trim XLT at $52,974. Those prices don’t include destination.”

    So the destination fee on the F-150 right now is about $1700. I don’t know what the “base” Lightning entails but that would make it less money than the 3.3L SuperCrew 4×4 (in other words the BEV is the cheapest 4WD crew cab F-150). On the XLT side, the BEV version will start about $3k more than a diesel or hybrid F-150 XLT SuperCrew.

    So some big questions:
    0. Is Ford going to be making any money on this thing under the “Platinum” trim level?
    1. Is Ford going to make up the ground on the low MSRP by charging *big* prices for the options (like the onboard power center and extended range battery)?
    2. Are they actually going to offer the “base” Lightning to retail customers?

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Take from this what you will, but a Ford exec claims the base model is profitable.

      https://www.thedrive.com/news/40696/how-ford-built-an-electric-f-150-that-can-do-real-work-for-40k

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        It looks like he claims the the F-150 Lightning line will be profitable but I don’t see anything specifically stating the more base trims are profitable. He also didn’t say anything about the margins compared to the ICE trucks.

        If the volume on this is high enough I guess I’ll keep an eye on Ford’s financial releases.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Perhaps he’s being cagey (Or I’m reading too much into the Drive’s headline for the article) but I took this statement to mean that even the base models are profitable, otherwise they wouldn’t make them and dealers wouldn’t stock them.

          “Otherwise the company doesn’t want to push them and the dealers don’t want to sell them. And that doesn’t work if we’re going to be volume in this market. Therefore, this is a margin positive product,”

          I suspect the profit margin on an XL 3.3L crew cab 4×4 is a lot higher than many people suspect, giving them more room to work with.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @ajla

          Maybe its profitable using Enron accounting techniques?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      0. Probably since the MSRP of the regular trucks isn’t the real price, or wasn’t before the chip shortage. Meanwhile there will be no discounts on the Lightning for a long time after they have gone back to big discounts on the gas versions.

      1. Probably

      2. Highly unlikely they will even offer the base version to fleets until it has been in production for 6-12 months.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      From Alex on Autos:

      “Contrary to what you may read elsewhere, NO, the Lightning EV truck will not be 426 HP, 4WD, with 230 miles of range for under $40k. There will be an F-150 Lightning for that price, but we don’t know the specs yet. Many journalists are conflating the specs released for the $53k XLT trim with the base model. What will the base model get? We’ll know next week, but it’s unlikely to be exactly what’s been reported.”

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        They do say that the work oriented Lightning will start at ~$40k with a targeted ~230 miles of range.

        Will the average consumer be able to buy something less than the ~$53k ~230 mi XLT, not any time soon. I don’t expect the XL to be available for at least 6 month-1 year after the production line is up to speed. The problem is by the time they start production of the XL version fleets will have bought out a year of more worth of allocation.

        As far as the hp/tq rating that is determined by the battery so if it has the ~230 mi battery it will have those hp/tq numbers.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m hoping they sell enough of these to justify putting the 7.3L into the Mustang without any CAFE worries.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Would a 7.3 Mustang really be better than a 5.0 Mustang? I’m not sure I’d want a lazy, low-revving pushrod V8 designed for HD trucks from the ground up in a sports car.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        This isn’t your uncle’s Triton motorhome engine.
        The 7.3L is more oversquare than the LS7. Give it an aluminum block and some reworked internals and it will be a very hard charger. It won’t pop as hard as the 5.0L but peak power would likely be over 6000 and redline a little over 6500.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Lots of LS powered Fox Bodies out there. No reason to think the 7.3 tuned for Mustang duty wouldn’t be a similar package. It is likely dimenisonally similar, if not smaller to the 5.0. The OHC motors are wide.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I’m in route to Ford dealership to test drive Lightning right now. Tired of waiting for my Cybertruck delivery.

  • avatar
    Rocket

    As predicted, somebody isn’t happy. Honestly didn’t expect even him to be this butt-hurt though. But I get it … it must be painful watching a despised brand continue to be a pioneer in the pickup truck market. The launch of the Raptor R should be even more interesting.

  • avatar

    what are the emf effects from riding on a better?

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Rivian should be worried.

    I’m no Ford fanboy, but at least the company will probably still be around in 10 years should the truck need maintenance or parts.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The reality is that the average 1/2 ton pickup NEVER tows a thing in its life, let alone a 5K+ one hundreds of miles per day, every day. Of the people who live in my neighborhood who have a truck maybe 25% of them own a trailer.

    For me the farthest my pickup has been from home is just over 100 miles away, throw in a little around town use at the destination and I don’t think it has ever been driven more than 250 miles in a day. So yeah the 300mi range would be tight in the winter with some degradation but still doable with a small bump from a fast charger hopefully while grabbing a bite to eat and doing a bathroom break.

    My biggest problem is my truck can sit for weeks at a time w/o being used though I guess if it was as cheap to run as this will be we might take it on daily errands/shopping trips since it is a vehicle with a trunk.

    Seriously this is what completes the transition to the 1/2 ton pickup being the replacement for the full size sedan. A sealed, locked out of sight place for your luggage, tools, or possibly golf clubs.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Agreed. I think people are sleeping a bit on how handy the frunk will be.

      Ironically given the charge constraints this truck would actually be much easier for me to use on family travel than a normal F-150.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Nice job, Ford.

    (I can drive this vehicle all day inside a building, and no one [including me] will have to hear it or smell it. That makes me happy.)

    [If I owned a ‘film’ production studio – and I don’t – I would order two of these ASAP.]

  • avatar
    deanst

    The bigger picture is that pickups will all be electric eventually, and I would bet that one of the “Detroit 3” (can we think of a better name for a group that includes Stellantis) will not make the transition successfully,

    During the transition, margins will be depressed, and firms like Ford will face declining profitability as they increase electric volume. The time is ripe for Toyota, Tesla or even Hyundai/Kia to finally take meaningful share in the pickup market. I suspect Ford will not emerge as the company it is today, with the family finally giving up control.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Ford is giving up. Clearly, they can’t compete with Toyota, Honda, and Kia for mass market vehicles like the Civic and RAV4. So, now they have joined the woke “virtue signaling” game hoping to get lots of money from the government for building super expensive left wing garbage. God help this country.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Ford sold 787,422 Full Sized Pickups last year. That is rougly 100k more units than the Civic managed globally. I’d call that “Mass Market”.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Ford Motor Company U.S. vehicle sales were
        – 3,457,996 in 2000
        – 1,440,653 in 2009

        That’s a drop of 58% in less than a decade.

        Ford currently sells a lot of pickups in the U.S. This could change relatively quickly.

        https://carsalesbase.com/us-ford/

        F-Series U.S. vehicle sales peaked in 2004:
        https://carsalesbase.com/us-ford-f-series/

        Mustang sales volume is 27% of 1980 levels:
        https://carsalesbase.com/us-ford-mustang/

        Here is a vehicle which sold 420,690 units in the U.S. in 1985:
        https://carsalesbase.com/us-ford-escort/

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Sure it could. The landscape can change rapidly for any automaker for a variety of reasons. His assertion was that the F series is not “Mass Market” compared to import models like the RAV-4, Civic and other Kia vehicles. Sales numbers on the F-Series or any of the big 3’s pickups do not support the claim that they are not “mass market”. Furthermore, both GM and Ford are competetive sales wise with the import crossovers so the arguement would hings on compact and midsized sedans which I would argue that, at least in the US are less mass market than pickups.

  • avatar
    Dan

    That work truck price tag is too good to be true. For 40K with fed rebates besides they’ll sell heaps of them.

    240 miles on the sticker is like 190 in the real world day one off the lot and 170 after a couple of years of actually driving it. Of course I don’t drive 170 miles every day, or even one day a week, but I do drive 100 and change and getting home with 40 miles in the tank is not something I’m irresponsible enough to do.

    Add the markup for the retail trim, and the markup again for the 150kWh battery pack, and the presumable markups for every other feature in the truck like they do with the gas ones to turn 40K into 55 and as you’d actually want it it’ll be more than a King Ranch.

    I don’t know about you but I’d take the King Ranch.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    As if there’s a perfect vehicle for all scenarios and occasions (no matter how occasional). Suddenly a fullsize gas pickup is the world’s most amazing vehicle?

    I don’t mind the 5 minute inconvenience, but I have to pay for the fuel myself and Jack just tell the small kids screaming at you to shut the hell up.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      This is spoken like someone who has never been trapped in a car with two toddlers for 500 miles.

      If only telling them to shut up did anything.

      Making that trip 7 hours instead of 9 is well worth paying the $50 in gas.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        We found the best way to get the kids (now 7 and 4) to shut up was to break the trip up and give them time to run around. We do the 17-hour drive over two days, with each day in three chunks of ~3 hours. As long as there were a L3 charger in each place where we want to stop, doing the trip in an EV really wouldn’t change all that much.

        It also got a lot easier for each kid at around age 3-4. Toddlers on the road are just really hard.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Wow! It sounds brutal.. Do they stop screaming at you when the truck is moving too? For the whole road trip or just while stopped? Is that all toddler or just yours? I’d invest in serious ear protection though, like bomb site. Or loud rock through headphones.

        It sounds like a kid/toddler problem, not a truck problem.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          I’m not sure what point you’re trying to make here.

          The shorter I can make road trips, the better for me.

          That has nothing to do with my kids, or your kids, or my truck, or your truck.

          Adding two hours to charge when we go to Grandma’s house is something I’m willing to pay a lot to avoid. Very happy for you if you can afford to take a leisurely trip. I prefer not to.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Point is yeah it’s not for everyone, shocking as it is, no car ever is, especially when your kids are screamers.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Geez the comments. See what happens when I take a day off.

  • avatar
    wjtinfwb

    WOW! Lots of angry vitriol here. Is the F-150 Lightning a compromise? Of course it is. Every mass-market product is a compromise. I would have like to have seen 400 miles of range or more, but am not at all surprised to know range will be severely limited while towing heavy loads. That’s why Ford will happily sell you an F-150 Hybrid, EcoBoost 2.7 or 3.5 or 5.0 V8. What Ford did not do was “mail it in”. Right now there is NO battery available that will fit in a passenger vehicle and allow it to tow 10,000lbs for 400+ miles. None. Not Tesla, not GM, not Rivian or any of the other wannabe car makers out there. Ford built an F-150 EV not only to comply with future regulations but also to gauge the market and demand for an electric truck at the consumer level. Styling it conventionally, making it regular pick-up useful (except max. towing) and pricing it relatively mainstream will tell them a helluva lot more about the market and acceptance than some crazily styled, maximum performance 100k experiment ever will. Always amazed when us bloggers somehow conflate our sofa smarts for the actual wisdom of the MBA’s, Engineers, Product Planners and other highly focused, educated and compensated folks that make decisions at a succesful and tenured company like Ford, GM or most any other major automaker. I’m more a possible F-150 Hybrid prospect myself, but I’m glad Ford is building the F-150, Transit and Mach-E EV’s and know that they will only get better as acceptance grows.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    We occasionally lose power to coastal weather so a backup is sweet. I commute 88 miles a day so that works. My boat weighs 5K and I tow it maybe 13 miles at the most. I can hide the bodies in the frunk while out dragging the showboat jacked up 3/4 tons for the win!

  • avatar
    Red Miata

    Happy to see Ford is making progress on EVs. I can see this being great for multi-vehicle households, where both a gas and electric pickup can be the two primary vehicles.

    But there’s still a long way to go, and talk of banning gas vehicles changes the EV backlash from unnecessary luddite-speak to well deserved complaints about freedom of mobility – something that was even referred to as a ‘Right’ in last night’s reveal presentation.

    Barring incredible increases in range and longevity over the next 15 years, a there’s a large percentage of people out there where an EV won’t meet the needs for business or pleasure, whether folks behind the keyboard want to accept it or not. In my line of work the number of times I’ve followed a pack of cars on 600+ mile drives across interstate lines is too many to count. Not all tradesmen, consultants and businessmen like to fly. And the moment you tell them they are forced to fly or add an extra day away from home onto their trip because of charging, there will be a hell of an uproar.

    As an example on the personal front that hasn’t been mentioned, not every family moving their kid to college is able to break a daylong hassle into multiple days to make it 500-600 miles round trip. Ever been to a big ten college move in day? There’s staggered drop off/unloading times, and no parking to speak of. Hotels for 50 miles out are fully booked. So unless every space in town and every space in roadside truck stops have fast charging, it’s a non-starter with only EVs.

    I won’t get into longevity and the effects on the used car market, but I have hope that battery replacement will be cost effective at 100k miles to keep good cars on the road. My point is, I’m for EVs, and I’m okay that progress takes time, but the moment you tell me a vehicle that suits my needs perfectly will be ‘banned’ when the competing technology isn’t ready, I will promptly tell you to go pound salt.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • dukeisduke: You mean like the million mile Tundra? That “wives tale”? https://www.motortrend.com/...
  • FreedMike: The right spec is over at the Ram or Ford dealer, where you can find trucks that aren’t ridiculously...
  • FreedMike: @JK: “EV’s are great for city dwellers with short commutes, people with homes and chargers in...
  • dukeisduke: I’m hoping the aftermarket steps up with a grille and bumper combination that makes these look...
  • FreedMike: Problem is, developing any vehicle, EV or otherwise, is tech-intensive, time-intensive and...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber