By on May 14, 2021

We’re hearing that the 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 EV will offer 300 miles of range in the U.S. ahead of the May 24 date in which Hyundai will make that number official.

Well, OK, we’re hearing it via a report in Carscoops.

The report further indicates that while the car will use a 58 kWh or 72.6 kWh battery pack in most markets, it will use a 77.4 kWh unit here in the States.

At least for single-motor, rear-drive Ioniq 5s, according to the report. Other models will include a dual-motor variant that makes 302 horsepower.

Charge time may be impressive, too, as the report indicates that when plugged into a 350 kW charger, the battery will go from 10 percent to 80 in 18 minutes.

Impressive numbers on paper, to be sure, if the report turns out to be true. That truth will be revealed in 10 days.

[Image: Hyundai]

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30 Comments on “Report: 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 EV to Offer 300 miles of Range in U.S....”


  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Impressive.

  • avatar
    Dynasty

    Are these batteries behaving like the batteries in laptops and cell phones?

    Really good life when new, but quickly degrade?

    Are we to expect a 300 mile range when new, but after a few years you’re lucky to 100 miles?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      No, no, and no.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I think the only thing we know for sure is that it won’t be economical to re-up the battery in an ev. A Tesla 3 costs about 16 grand for a non-warranty battery replacement. That’s why most older Leafs are used as local runabouts / golf carts.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        That’s why you go to a Tesla independent and have the bad cells identified and replaced. Otherwise, with 800 to 1000 cycles until the battery drops to 80% on some batteries that are going out the door now, that’s 240k miles on a 300 mile range car. With a 500 cycle battery, you’re at 80% at 150k miles. Even then, what, you’re down to 240 miles range. On an ICE with CVT you’ll be down to zero miles range at that point. What’s the price of repairs on a 10-speed transmission of CVT turbo car after 150k to 250k miles?

        • 0 avatar

          Installed reman CVT on an Altima runs around 25-2800 last I checked. There was a place near me used to do reman special on the Honda 5 speed auto at 2k installed haven’t seen that special advertised in a while thou.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            It’s the same EV or ICE, going to an independent is cheaper. There are ex-Tesla techs that have left and started their own shops in various places. You can get independent service on an EV, sometimes they can use parts from wrecked cars. My only reference was on a dealer replaced transmission on a just-out-of-warranty Mazda 17 years ago that cost $5K. Then there’s BMW maintenance.

            There are also 2 dynamics in play. I think EVs are improving and are getting cheaper to maintain while ICE is getting more complex and more expensive. Newer battery technology will remove battery costs from the maintenance costs on EVs.

            http://www.devx.com/wireless/Article/40842
            https://www.motortrend.com/news/toyota-solid-state-battery-ev-2021/

      • 0 avatar

        And what about older Teslas? Where they end up?

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “And what about older Teslas? Where they end up?”

          From what I can tell, on the road being driven.

          • 0 avatar

            It is interesting how Leaf disappeared but every Nth car on the road is Tesla. Is it the battery design of Leaf was such an awful vehicle?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The number of non Tesla EVs in existence is much less than produced Teslas. Then there is the low demand/low resale for non Tesla EVs to account for of course.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Early Leafs did have an inherently flawed battery design. Now, the value of the earliest ones generally won’t support a battery replacement.

            No other EV produced in large numbers (including later Leafs) has the same design issue. Their batteries will degrade, but much slower—you can expect a Tesla or Bolt with 150k miles to still have 80% or more of the original range.

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            I still wouldn’t trust a Leaf’s battery longevity so long as they stick with a passive (air) cooling design for the battery, especially in climates that routinely have elevated temperature extremes. I think the Kia Soul EV has an air-cooled battery, as well.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            The air-cooled disadvantages even go beyond battery longevity. Range loss in winter can be decreased by warming the battery and quick charging times reduced by using the cooling/heating system to precondition the battery. Nissan is going with liquid cooling/heating for the Ariya.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    This one was flying below my radar.

    Now I’ll actually pay attention when Alex Dykes does his review.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Would love for this to be real. VW has basically given up the electric-hot-hatch market in the US, which is a shame, considering that my old GTI was basically the perfect city car. Something that’s small enough to squirt around town but big enough in back to hold all my gear (which was the problem with the Bolt and even the Kona), that can charge my garage, and can make Boston-to-NYC on one charge, is the dream.

  • avatar
    Yankee

    I’m with you guys. I want this to be true. Electric cars are already range-competitive. The sooner electric cars become price-competitive options, the sooner there will be downmarket options (e.g., Sub-20K) for guys like me in the cheap seats as a single dad. I know that this will mean that mechanics like me will be obsolete, but I don’t mind. I don’t want my kids depending on 1890s ICE technology like I am. (Plus what’s not to love about instant power and torque with way less moving parts and fluids?) I’m keeping an eye on battery technology and hoping for a breakthrough that will at least alleviate the reliance on mining rare-earth metals, and recycling technologies that will make these cars worth something more than a used condom once the battery goes bad.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-think/transportation/advanced-cars/mahles-electric-motor-says-look-ma-no-contacts

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        That’s really cool. Motors are a whole other area of technology where we’ll keep seeing advances like this. Anyway, I guess Mahle has found something to replace their piston business.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I really dig this design and package, and the size is right. I wish there was a ICE/hybrid version though b/c an EV probably wouldn’t work for me at the current moment.

  • avatar

    It looks like Pontiac from 1970s. May be they buy rights for Pontiac brand name from GM? I would be cool if all electric Hyundais were marketed under Pontiac brand name in dedicated Pontiac dealerships.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Very curious about a Palisade-sized Ioniq 7? 8?

    I would love an EV that is to the Audi e-tron as the gas Palisade is to the Audi Q7.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The Ioniq 5 is supposed to evoke the design ethos of Hyundai’s original car, the Pony from the late 1970s. Let us all hope it doesn’t provide the same flimsiness, so well-known to older Canadians but unknown to Americans. To help it along its way, the Ioniq 5 comes with a pre-dented angled slash scar across its flanks. Very nice. Not.

    The companion Kia EV6 running the same boogaloo chassis underneath the froth, looks quite good in profile by comparison, but loses the plot completely with its front and rear design which are completely non-complementary to each other and the profile. Heidy-ho.

    I like this commentary from an Irish writer: “Cabin-wise, both cars again offer quite different, if broadly similar solutions. Both are dominated by large slab-like screens, a lack of haptic knobs and controllers and a broadly soulless environment, devoid of warmth. … But like so many of the current BEV breed, it seems so very hard to feel even the remotest level of enthusiasm.”

    If all most of the commentariat here are concerned with is range and not design, fill yer boots.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Depending on how closely it comes to meeting the specs and how far down Hyundai can keep the price, this could be a winner (maybe even a game-changer).

    300 mile range (which translates to ~270 usable) with an 18 minute DCFC charge time isn’t the EV Holy Grail, but it sure brings them much closer to being a mainstream vehicle ‘if’ they’re not priced in the stratosphere (*cough* Tesla, Mach-E *cough*).

  • avatar
    swester

    Not gonna lie – I really love this (and its partner EV, the Kia EV6). If Biden gets another federal EV incentive going, I’d pick up one of these right away.

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