By on March 11, 2021

On Wednesday, the U.S. Senate voted 66-34 to confirm Michael Regan as the next administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Biden campaign had signaled that it wanted to clean house following appointments from the Trump administration well before the election, noting that the EPA was of particular importance since it needs to be in line with the bold energy strategy. Regan’s role as administrator is essential since he’ll have the ability to encourage the United States to reduce emissions wherever possible.

Whereas the Trump administration sought to undo Obama-era policies it deemed untenable and soften the power of highly influential independent executive agencies, Biden and company are bent on restoring those policies while strengthening some of its own. Regan (44) is presumed to pursue greenhouse gas emissions reductions for automobiles, powerplants, and oil refineries by any means available. He began his career as an environmental regulator for the EPA during the Clinton administration, stayed on through the Bush years, and later joined the Environmental Defense Fund — a nonprofit environmental advocacy group that frequently partners with multinational companies to create “market-driven” solutions to climate change.  

Democrats have claimed this background as ideal, suggesting it showcased Regan’s commitment to the environment. But a minority of Republicans argued that his background indicated he’d only move one direction on the issues. The big concern was how this might impact America’s workforce, however. The Biden administration’s green policies have already resulted in the loss of 11,000 jobs when it nixed the Keystone XL pipeline by executive order, according to TC Energy Corp. But Republicans have argued the actual number is much higher when the big picture is taken into account (drilling bans) and caution against similar actions in the future. They’re arguing that shifting away from oil is just going to make fuel prices higher and make us more dependent on the whims of foreign nations. Dems have claimed this is bunk and that millions of new jobs will eventually be created via environmental focused initiatives.

Automotive issues are a bit more nuanced. Most seem to think the United States should absolutely be a leader in battery technologies. But many are also worried that transitioning toward EVs will reduce the number of American jobs since they require fewer man-hours for final assembly.

There are likewise growing concerns that the U.S. could paint itself into a corner by enacting emission targets that some powerplants cannot meet — resulting in more renewable sources of energy production. While Democrats argue this is a good thing, Republicans are once again fretting about the likelihood of rising energy prices. It’s a valid concern, frankly. Energy prices are already rising and there’s a fear that the U.S. could end up like Germany or China — both of which signaled that they would strive for carbon neutrality and joined the Paris Climate Accord, but ultimately ended up increasing their emissions by building a slew of coal-fired powerplants after renewables failed to produce sufficient energy.

Then again, the Biden administration has set goals to totally eliminate emissions from powerplants by 2035 and Democrats have said that’s not possible without there being major changes to the infrastructure and strengthened environmental policies. For all the strides national gas and oil companies have made to enhance carbon capture and greenify their facilities, it would be next to impossible for them to emit no carbon in a little over a decade. That really only leaves nuclear power and/or a total shift toward renewables and with an updated energy grid capable of storing vast amounts of energy — the latter being to be the general trajectory Michael Regan is assumed to take.

While this opens us up to the ecological impact of renewables and building an almost unfathomable number of bus-sized batteries, we’ve seen the focus stay on carbon (or hydrocarbon) emissions for the most part. The same is true for electric vehicles, which have some ecological problems of their own. But since they don’t pollute at the tailpipe, they’ve become a popular alternative with lawmakers and Wall Street.

Regan has already indicated his unbridled support for EVs and the Biden administration wants to normalize them as quickly as possible. But we imagine there will be some limitations. As tempting as EVs are, most examples of governments utilizing them serve as an example of what not to do (e.g. the LAPD’s fleet of BMW i3s). The current level of the technology sort of makes them ideal for certain situations and terrible for others. They also cost substantially more than a similarly capable internal combustion car — something we’ve seen manifest with the USPS recent truck purchase from Oshkosh Defense — and are anticipated to recoup the added expense by requiring less maintenance and boasting lower operating costs.

It’s the usual political drama with members on one side claiming Regan was an ideal candidate while the other suggests he lacks an objective perspective. West Virginia Senator Shelley Moore Capito (the top Republican on the Senate’s energy panel) even went so far as to claim the new head of the EPA won’t matter much with Gina McCarthy serving as the White House National Climate Advisor. As a former EPA administrator under Obama, McCarthy has a long history of supporting green initiatives and Biden used an executive order to create an entirely new position so she could head the White House Office of Domestic Climate Policy.

“I hope Secretary Regan can cut Gina McCarthy out of power and let her know who is calling the shots for environmental policy in the Biden administration,” Capito told the legislature.

[Image: The White House]

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76 Comments on “Senate Confirms Biden Admin Pick to Head EPA...”


  • avatar
    kcflyer

    “Then again, the Biden administration has set goals to totally eliminate emissions from powerplants by 2035 and Democrats have said that’s not possible without there being major changes to the infrastructure and strengthened environmental policies”

    So much fail in that statement, do these fools even read their own press releases? But hey, maybe this means that 1.9 trillion dollar boondoggle the dems just passed is all going to be used to build nuclear power plants and require every county in the United States to produce all of its own power. I’m down with that.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Reuters reports that China has built 3x more coal-powered power plants than rest of the world. Ans we are in Paris agreement and China not for 10 years. “Competency” of O’Biden governments is striking

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        So they just started cranking them all out since January?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          They did this all over 2020 and Trump properly took us from Paris agreement. Because it is not benefiting America. But Biden took us back with knowledge that China is not even planning to stop

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            That is some solid mental gymnastics. I give you 9.2 out of 10. But you commies always did well at gymnastics back in the day, so I’m not shocked.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Ah, so let’s blame Biden for China building coal plants…before he took office. I mean, we all know Biden controls the entire world, and can basically tell the Chinese to stop building coal plants.

            And because China isn’t all-in on being carbon neutral, no one else should be either. That’s kind of like saying “since some guy in Chicago hacked a bank account and took all the victim’s money, the guy who hacked and swindled my account should walk.”

            Right?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “And because China isn’t all-in on being carbon neutral, no one else should be either”

            Yes, let’s artificially weaken the US economy and industry while the PRC strengthens its industry. The US will make a nice clean country for the PRC to economically colonize in the decades ahead when it’s industry surpasses ours.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            @FreedMike

            O’Biden signed this agreement and they knew ahead that China is getting a huge advantage. America last

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            In fact, China generates more electricity from renewables than we do. And that tells me one thing: if we develop newer and better renewable tech, we can sell it to them…and they’ll buy it, because fossil fuel pollution is a huge, huge issue for them.

            Clean energy worsens our trade issues with China? I actually think it helps SOLVE the problem.

            It also screws the Russians – who deserve a thorough screwing. On the surface, it looks like they’re banking on oil and natural gas, but in reality, what they’re banking on is actually climate change – it will make Siberia a vast breadbasket, and open the Arctic Sea to shipping, both of which benefit them TREMENDOUSLY. Why do you think they were all-in on Trump? It’s not rocket science.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      I’m looking for 2-stroke triple to rev outside the local Dem office.
      ;-)

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    “Democrats have claimed this background as ideal…”

    And here we have a fundamental – and likely unreconcilable – difference in governing philosophy. People of my political persuasion would never think somebody who has spent his entire working life in the Federal bureaucracy or an advocacy non-profit as the ideal head of a vast, mostly independent – read unaccountable – agency with significant power to regulate our lives.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Mr Regan is more qualified than many other appointees. Presumably he understands something about how the bureaucracy works, which is important if you want to get things done.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Even if he has any qualifications, and I have no idea, the irony is that he wasn’t appointed because of his qualifications. Under Biden, sex and race decide your job.

        Recently, Jen Psaki was asked how Biden will improve [something]. Then answer was – he appointed a woman for the leadership position.

        Biden just started apartheid in this country. Thanks Joe, the “where am I” guy.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        SEC to Aux: Regan does have excellent credentials and I believe he will take the job seriously. Frankly, just by removing industry insiders that were running the show from the past error, I mean era, is a huge step forward. One thing this pandemic made clear is how much better our air quality can be when we stop burning things. The sooner we eliminate fossil fuels where possible the better off we will all be. As with everything in life, this comes with a cost. But in time the benefits will vastly outweigh the costs. Just imagine what air quality would be like today if emission controls were never forced on the automakers.

        Kudos to EDF as well. I’ve been a member for over 25 years and they always try working with industry first. They have engaged many programs that use the power of markets to drive improvements. The were the driving force to show McDonald’s that they could save money and reduce waste by eliminating foam food containers. They are not a bunch of jerks like Greenpeace – no people chaining themselves to oil tankers and other stupid moves. For at least the next four years it will be nice to see an agency actually work toward its intended purpose instead of simply letting polluters off the hook.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Are you saying they are going to go to China and India to take those polluters out? What abut ethanol? I doubt anybody will go after that polluting boondoggle.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @slavuta:
            “Are you saying they are going to go to China and India to take those polluters out? What abut ethanol? I doubt anybody will go after that polluting boondoggle.”

            TPP was supposed to include substantive steps in terms of evening out environmental and worker protections.

            It was also supposed to make homologation easier between the American automotive market and everyone else.

            Trump deep-sixed that TPP, while his voters cheered.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “TPP will be great for Hewlett-Packard, Intel, AMD, Dell, Apple and other electronics producers, who use components from Malaysia, where 28% of workers in the electronics industry are subject to forced labor. Producers of palm oil, textiles, and garments in Malaysia can continue to use child labor.”

            Yea, that was a great agreement!! Phew

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            TPP was intended to bind the economies of its member states into a bloc led by the US that specifically did not include (i.e. excluded) China. Which is why China so strongly opposed it.

            Trump’s decision to withdraw from TPP was a strategic blunder of the first magnitude, virtually guaranteeing Chinese domination of at least the western part of the Pacific Rim.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ect- agreed. Leaving TPP was an epic blunder. Undoing everything done by a black president isn’t much of a political strategy let alone a sound way to govern a superpower.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            If they had made TPP available for peoe to read and form an opinion on then perhaps people would have found it more paletable. Why all the cloak and dagger? When the government says “trust us, this is a good deal” and then won’t let anyone see it I think people will be skeptics and I for one am happy I live somewhere that is the case.

  • avatar
    redapple

    The Federal Govt destroys everything it touches.

    Closing down USA coal power INCREASES WORLD EMMISSIONS.
    USA Coal Plants – 95% Clean
    China – 0% clean. Stack it straight out the top.

    So, The coal here WILL BE BURNED. Not here at 95% clean but sold to china and burned 0% clean.

    Thanks – dont know no math marxist commie dems. Dems = AMERICA LAST !

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      redapple, coal is no longer economic as a fuel source for power generation, and will not recover. It was competitive with natural gas when gas was $6-7/mcf, but thanks to fracking and new discoveries in North America, gas is now barely $3. Coal can’t compete with that, even in existing plants.

      On top of that, solar and wind are now cheaper than coal, and even cheaper than natural gas. Thanks to technology, renewables continue to decline in price, which is why they now account for most of new power generation capacity.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree nat gas blew coal out of the water, I need some real unbiased data on solar and wind is cheaper than nat gas @ $3 mcf (bearing in mind windmills failed in Texas recently and solar doesn’t scale and works better in certain climates than others). Not against these things but I see no way both are going to produce the 38% of electricity currently attributed to nat gas.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Windmills failed in Texas for the same reason other powerplants failed, they were not designed to withstand cold weather. The cold that crippled Texas would be easily tolerated in Canada. We have Windmills that work fine in cold weather much worse than Texas.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            It’s like snow in Atlanta. You don’t buy a fleet of snowplows for the 1 day every 2-3 years you get enough snow to use them.

            That’s not to say that Texas doesn’t have some issues with the rate or regulatory structure of their grid or have a plan in place so peoeple can go somewhere and not freeze to death, but building their grid to withstand a cold snap that comes once a century is to Canadian standards for weather is a total waste of money.

            Do Canadians build there homes for weather conditions like Texas experiences with respect to heat because every hundred years you get a serious heat wave? Or to LA earthquake standards not along fault lines? Or South Florida wind and flood standards? You build for the other 99 years.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “It’s like snow in Atlanta.”

            It happens regularly enough that they should know to winterize. I remember freezing temps even as far south as the Rio Grande Valley when I lived there (although it was only 4 hours). BTW, they had an awesome old KA10 at UT Pan Am in Edinburgh back then. Snow north of Austin when I was a kid. It’s the power grid and you don’t take chances saying you can afford to shut it down every few years. El Paso didn’t make that mistake. The rest of the state was warned multiple times. There are things you can risk. Some things like a power grid that isn’t connected to the national grid you can’t take any risks on. San Antonio has hit 0 degrees fahrenheit back in 1949, so temps have certainly been low before.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            You can likely do some common sense things better, but building it out like the Canadian grids for that once in a hundred or even 50 years thing? No, that is a waste.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Actually, what they’re doing with grid storage may be the best move and a good compromise. That way, if the other things fail, the grid storage system probably won’t. That way, they can probably get away with not winterizing everything. The natural gas pipelines will probably get winterized for sure. They probably lost some money not being able to sell gas and don’t want that to happen again.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay
            Texas had a cold snap 10 years ago. It was recommended then that they upgrade their equipment. The argument levied by the right was that Texas power failed due to windmills was stupid.

            A house built to withstand -45C will easily tolerate +45C since insulation also keeps excess heat out. It isn’t hard to add an AC unit. Our electrical grid could easily cope with the extra AC units.
            My town is along two rivers. If you live closer to the rivers your home must be built to account for flooding.

            We’ve had a few mild earthquakes here and any large building has to meet minimum standards.

            In Canada, if an event occurs that causes havoc in important utilities, regulations get changed to account for it and upgrades are made. Texas did not do that.

            I’m not saying that Texas should meet Canadian standards. They should have upgraded with the last cold spell a decade ago.

  • avatar
    redapple

    President Bidet is Great !

  • avatar
    Cicero

    Biden isn’t doing anything. Biden just shuffles around, drools a little, and signs whatever his handlers put in front of him. Then it’s time for a nap, usually by 10 a.m.

    Obama holdovers are running the show.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “Obama holdovers are running the show.”

      Even if what you are saying were true, it’s still a big upgrade from the clown show we have from January 2017 through January 2021.

      Obama holdovers know how to get things done within the government, rather than sitting around ranting about the deep state on Twitter — while they dismiss the pandemic that’s killed a half a million Americans.

      A bunch of Obama holdovers is a big upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Lets start Biden death watch.

      I bet – under 2 months and he is out

      • 0 avatar

        You are late to party.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Will it be polonium poisoning via your Comrade?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Art, let me first sidestep to Litvinenko and his poisoning. When a cop died after January 6 every news agency reported that he was beaten. But now we know that nothing happened to him, his death was a coincidence.
          Litvinenko – same. You can read this British publication for example https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/05/litvinenko-report-get-it-wrong-putin

          And just for anybody to say that Putin needed to poison Litvinenko because he wrote a book… with Polonium… But nobody ever mentions that Litvinenko worked for Berezovskiy – most dangerous man in Russia at the time. A person who sold weapons to Chechen terrorists while his country fought them. Litvinenko was part of mafia in which of course were many x-KGB people, including Litvinenko. His father denies Putin’s involvement. So, you should use realistic data, Art.

          Back to Bidon – dude is half dead, mentally. He reminds me late Brezhnev or Chernenko, a figurehead with a prompter to read off. This is all he does. Hannity said, his sources telling him that White House is in panic mode. What, American people did not see that Biden is done? DNC manipulated Bernie out yet again for Biden this time. Did you say democracy? haha

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            What of Alexei Navalny? It is wierd how these opponents of Putin keep getting poisoned with incredibly hard to obtain substances. Crazy, right? But yeah, probably a crazy coincidence.

            You know, I used to think it was just funny, but man, you are an honest to god Russian troll arent you?

            As to dude’s father denying Putin’s involvement, yeah I can’t imagine why that is. Or maybe he doesn’t want his own Bacon Lettuce and Polonium sandwich for lunch.

            Now go ahead and post whatever you have that shows any other deaths are obvious fabrications to discredit your glorious leader. I am sure it is in the talking points they give you every morning.

            Putin is like Ray Liotta in Goodfellas I guess…so many killings around him, but it is always someone else lol.

            Did you take it hard when the wall came down and PRAVDA closed their doors? I do love how you always are quick to point out the pro Soviet points though. Makes me remember how rotten you were/are.

            And yes, we know our democracy is clearly fake and rigged and if we want to see a truly transparent democracy we should look to the glorious example in Russia. On a totally unrelated note, did they ever tell Alexei Navalny’s family what gulag they sent him to? (This is where you insert some totally obscure and rational reason for sending him to Prison that the rest of the world is totally unaware of and has nothing to do with his being a vocal critict of Putin and probably link to an RT article)

            Man just stop and sell your BS in China or North Korea…they are more aligned with your beliefs. Anyway, say hi to your handler for me.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            My bad. I guess the resto of the world just missed what a great guy he is. Troll on Comrade. If you were Chinese, your social credit score would be through the roof!

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          “What of Alexei Navalny? It is weird how these opponents of Putin keep getting poisoned”

          The bottom line here is that you, Art, have no knowledge of the situation and read some crap and then come with some crazy ideas. You simply don’t understand anything about Putin, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, etc. You get information from the sources that write deliberate lies. There are many problems in Russia. But Navalny is not one of them.

          That Navalny is Putin’s opponent is a myth created in the west. Last time Navalny ran for office was 2013 Moscow mayor office and he lost. He criticizes the government of corruption but he is corrupted himself and in jail for THAT, he is also a white nationalist and everything he “uncovers” so far being a fake. Like a “golden Putin’s palace” that was created in the movie studio in Germany paid from America. Why don’t you read this
          https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2021/02/a_closer_look_at_the_alexei_navalny_case.html

          The Communist party in Russia gets 4 times support over Navalny. Navalny has a nice bitcoin wallet and some people keeps putting hundreds of thousands of $$ into it. Navalny sells protests.

          There was another guy, Nemtsov. He was gunned down near Kremlin. Must be Putin. Read OPCW report. “Navalny’s blood and urine samples have similar structural characteristics as the toxic chemicals belonging to schedules 1.A.14 and 1.A.15” – NOTE: similar not SAME “… This cholinesterase inhibitor is not listed in the Annex on Chemicals to the Convention.” – means, it is not any known “chemical weapon”, that again, does not kill. Again, Navalny has real enemies, not like Putin. Local governments in Siberia that he and his people crossed. Or Khodorkovsky. Why did he go back? He could stay in Germany indefinitely. I think, he knows that he is safer in Russian jail than in Germany.

          Alvis Hermanis recently said – “American cultural institutions have a process related to wokeness and cancellation similar to one from KGB.”
          He said this to a small audience of possibly 3 million Latvian speakers. And Facebook took down his post.

          I don’t know what else you need?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Art, talk facts, not BS and tales

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Art, rest of your world, not mine. Better watch this 2 min vid https://youtu.be/7dnkn-MvM3U

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          See, I told you, delusion runs high in your blood stream. Just like any other “evarage Joe”, you can’t separate fact from the fake. A lie from the science. You don’t like Pravda but you watch CNN. You applause a guy who has no control in the white house. At least in USSR we knew that dude is incapable and we did not care what communist party had to say. We just went about our own business. And given the opportunity took the regime down. And you telling me (below) that Biden is science? He hardly knows what is is talking about. Delusional

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “It’s the usual political drama with members on one side claiming Regan was an ideal candidate while the other suggests he lacks an objective perspective.”

    Why should the nominee of an elected official be objective? Sorry, Republicans – that sword cuts both ways.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’m not sure Mr Regan needs to do anything to promote EVs. They are already gaining popularity under existing policies.

    US EV market share in 2016: 0.82%
    US EV market share in 2020: 1.8% (doubled over Trump’s term)
    US EV market share in 2021: 3.5% (analyst predicted)

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    When Mr. Regan was first nominated I recall we reviewed him and his qualifications were impeccable. However I am concerned how he will approach this obsession with emissions, since “cutting emissions” below historic levels is code for “destroy industry”. I really do think it is a good idea to improve processes and I think there are many on the other side who would be willing to partner in order to make reasonable changes or implement effective technologies. However all too often elements of his party take an extreme and authoritarian approach which is often destructive.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      +1, 28. Good comment.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I think “destroy industry” is not really a fair generalization. The reality is that as technology and priorities change, the affected industries also change. AT&T surely makes nothing on the “Telegraph” part of their name and frankly does not make much on voice communications. But they evolved to be a big part of the new connected world. Steel towns and rust belt regions all fell on hard times, driven by changes many of which were not at all regulation induced. They, too have changed. There is nothing preventing a big oil company like ExxonMobil to pivot into a producer of alternative energy equipment. Ultimately regulation may hurt certain industries but at the same time they can open doors to new industry. The key is to help those affected people transition to something new when that coal mine closes.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        Yes. Technology is always disruptive, and the increasingly rapid pace of technological development is only increasing the rate of disruption.

        At least to date, though, technology has created more jobs than it has destroyed. The problem is, they’re different jobs. Unskilled and low-skilled jobs have disappeared, to be replaced by higher-skilled jobs that companies have trouble filling. The K-shaped economy has been a real thing for at least the past 2 decades.

        The problem is, politicians refuse to address this issue, and instead seek band-aid solutions and straw bogeymen to blame. And voters encourage them.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @ect- I read that over the next few decades the new tec boom will eliminate at least 50% of jobs of which most will be unskilled or low skilled repetitive jobs. Post secondary education in skilled trades or university will become a necessary prerequisite to employment.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Lou

            Prior to 2020 there were various predictions of 30% job losses by 2030.

            https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/29/one-third-of-us-workers-could-be-jobless-by-2030-due-to-automation.html

            Although this was already baked into the cake, the virus situation seems to have accelerated it:

            https://www.politico.com/news/2021/02/05/biden-automation-american-labor-force-466397

            “Post secondary education in skilled trades or university will become a necessary prerequisite to employment.”

            Lou I don’t know if you were aware, but the minimum wage jobs in the US have been “preferring” the BA/BS undergrad for sometime and the corporate jobs all be requiring it. In fact for slightly older people, they have faced discrimination in the corporate world for *not* possessing such a thing. One of my exes was held back by this, she dropped out of a Music B.A. in 1992 and found a job as an assistant manager of a small store. A few years later she entered cell phone sales, got married/divorced and had her son. Because of her son, she stayed in sales and eventually worked her way out of the mall into the corporate side as a trainer. When I met her, the cell phone company had just cut her after 18 years and despite these years in sales/sales training plus whatever before she could not get an interview in sales. Looking back I don’t know if she was just doing something wrong on the resumes or phone screens but she just couldn’t get a interview which spiraled her into a depression which I could not pull her out of, sad really.

            What I argued at the time and do now, is the EEOC actually do something about this education discrimination. There are only so many starting roles which *require* a minimum amount of education, most only require basic skills acquired in secondary education and the rest is learned on the job. Yet, the thinking among HR drones is: yes your B.A. in Sanskrit but zero experience makes you more qualified than my ex’s 18 years in sales for a sales job. This is what is happening down here.

            @ect

            “At least to date, though, technology has created more jobs than it has destroyed”

            That’s nice to say but it cannot possibly be proven.

            “Unskilled and low-skilled jobs have disappeared”

            I agree, but:

            “to be replaced by higher-skilled jobs that companies have trouble filling”

            is BS corporate-speak. They say this so they can petition for more H-1B they can pay less and treat terribly.

            I do agree though the politicians do nothing, its because they are bought and paid for while the voter’s education level has gone down despite education attainment going up. Not a coincidence.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @28-Cars-Later – People have been sold on post secondary education but they haven’t been told to look at that education based on outcome. The whole “you can do anything you want as long as it makes you happy” pitch catches many people. I’ve told my sons that they should also look at marketability. Kinda hard to be happy with a PhD standing at the doors of Walmart greeting people.
            Skilled trades are valuable post secondary education. In my part of the world many tradesmen make incredible wages.
            I do agree that experience should count. My brother is a capital projects manager and all he has is a “tech” diploma. The PhD types in his office whine about it all the time. They’ve threatened to complain. He laughed at them, went to his office and came back with his contract. He showed them the names of those who signed off on it. They were the top executives in the corporation. He pointed out that he answers to them not the managers in his office.

  • avatar

    Thanks almighty, finally. Americans had cheap gas and everything else for too long. It is time to wake up and join the rest of the humanity.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Name your gas price – Americans will pay it.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yep. Sucks I you are poor though. Here’s 1400 bucks to soften the blow.

      • 0 avatar

        There is no need to drive car every day anymore. Where you are going to go? To shopping mall? Office? Movie theater? It is so 20th century. Better sign up for a faster internet.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Many people still go to work daily and have been through all of this. Something about frowning upon bring classified data home with you. I’m sure all the cooks and servers I see when I go out to lunch can work from home too. And the roofer that was here today…he can replace those shingles via internet too! And the builders down the street. And the doctor that gave me.the vaccination.

          Many of us still going to work. I think the real shock is going to be when businesses figure out that many of that not only do they not need many of those employees to come to the office but that they really don’t need them on the payroll anymore. Just as many businesses have spent the last year learning where the fat is in their labor force.

          • 0 avatar

            I meant well paying jobs. Those who can buy new cars. With VPN you have no problem. I always had company laptop with VPN and worked from anywhere in the world, any country, bus, airport, airplane. All classified.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I received this letter today from my big boss

            “Today marks the 1-year anniversary that we packed up our equipment and headed home ….
            Together we have weathered the challenges, rose to the occasion and adapted, and truly flourished as an organization. We have gained momentum in the marketplace, continued to deliver amazing products, improved our processes and operations, welcomed many new team members, and continuously delighted our clients and partners. …”

            Working from home…. works

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I’m not sure what you consider well paying @insidelookingout, but I must be doing alright since apparently I didn’t need a stimulus.

            And no, you aren’t looking at what I’m doing on a bus via a VPN unless that bus is going to drop you off at Leavenworth.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And I can’t speak for all or even most businesses and fields. Everyone has done some amount of work from home, but for most of us the circumstances of what we do kept that to a minimum.

            There are some we sent home last March that have been working from home since and I can tell you they are the ones that are largely viewed as dead weight. With minor exceptions (we have some really good remote developers, but they were remote before all this started anyway) they could not bring those folks back and we wouldn’t notice.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Today marks the 1-year anniversary that we packed up our equipment and headed home”

            Wow, even Kremlin backed troll farms have moved home!

            Will wonders ever cease?

          • 0 avatar
            el scotto

            @Art Vandelay Sir, a fist bump from one who understands your comment about the bus dropping someone of at Leavenworth.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Soon, your gasoline purchase will be only possible if you have vaccine shot. Otherwise, not allowed to buy

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Too bad for you we won’t accept that Russian Vaccine. Still I hope they don’t mix it up with a vial of Novichok Nerve Agent for your sake. I hear those things happen over there.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Or, watch out for that open window on the 14th floor…

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          you see how easy is to brainwash you. I speak only from factual basis. Biden said this – “soon you will know what you can or can’t do” (related to vaccination)

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yeah, waiting for input from the doctors and scientists before shooting his mouth off basically makes him a despot.

            Man you live in a strange world

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Biden’s scientists are CNN, Pelosi, youtube and loser Faucci

          Actually, 1 month listening to Faucci and I said to my wife – Trump should kick this guy out. He was polluting air. He said
          – this virus is not going to be big thing. We have nothing to worry
          – masks don’t help. they may stop a droplet – don’t wear them
          – I don’t see how we can do China-style lockdowns, we’re free country and this is impossible in US

          The list can go on. So please, don’t tell me about science with your anti-science.

          • 0 avatar
            el scotto

            @ slavuta Sir, dog whistle very much? Three out four things you cited as Biden’s scientists are dog whistles or triggers to the far right. I have never heard, and deepfakes don’t count, Dr. Faucci say the first two things you accuse him of saying. Also, an ex-president cannot kick out the current president. You should have learned that in your citizenship class. If you had taken one. The NIH and the CDC are world leaders in science. You and Inside Looking Out really should go back to being supply officers. Your collective -irony meant- attempts at trolling do not bode well for your careers. I hear the gulags needs officer guards.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I remembered you said, “Too bad for you we won’t accept that Russian Vaccine.”

          I think, you’re correct for once. 14 countries in Europe are stopping using AstraZeneca vaccine due to people developing blood clots. European regulator accelerating certification of Russian vaccine while several European countries went on to use it without waiting for the certification.

          CDC reports 1637 deaths after taking US vaccines. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html

          For the historical reference, immunology has started in Russian Empire as medical science and had been strong ever since.

          It is interesting that you’ve mentioned Novichok. Using your logic, Pfizer’s vaccine (Pfizer is mass producer) which is developed by German BioNTech must have Zyclon-D…

          Here is interesting comparison but it is missing 2 other important vaccines – CoviVac and EpiVacCorona. With scientists salivating about EpivacCorona

          https://gulfnews.com/special-reports/which-is-the-best-covid-19-vaccine-a-side-by-side-comparison-1.1611499861104

          NOTE: deception when it says Moscow Times. This publication is a foreign agent. Lancet measures effectiveness at 94%

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      el scotto

      it is really funny to hear about GULAG from a US person considering Guantanamo Bay, American Japanese prison camps, secret CIA jails and a country with largest prison population in the world.
      ha-ha

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