By on February 2, 2021

Ridgeline

The 2021 Honda Ridgeline arrives at dealerships today, with all-new sheetmetal upfront, a 280-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6, 9-speed automatic, and torque-vectoring all-wheel drive standard across the lineup. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price starts at $36,490, with a destination charge of $1,175.

Ridgeline

As we described in an earlier post, the 2021 Ridgeline benefits from a redesign that speaks to its capabilities. The Ridgeline is said to have the segment’s largest interior for passengers and gear, featuring a flat floor and foldaway 60/40-split rear seat bottoms. Ridgelines have a versatile bed with a class-exclusive, in-bed lockable storage compartment, and standard AWD model payload capacity.

Ridgeline

All Ridgelines feature 18-inch wheels and an additional 20 mm of track width to provide a stance more in keeping with that of a truck. New all-terrain tires with a more aggressive sidewall and shoulder design aid performance as well as appearance. Speaking of appearance, a new Radiant Red Metallic has been added to its exterior color palette.

Ridgeline

Four post-production option packages available on all Ridgeline trims include Function – $270, Function Plus – $1,315, Utility – $1,465, and a new HPD package – $2,800. Developed in collaboration with Honda’s racing arm, Honda Performance Development (HPD), the package includes a distinctive grille treatment, HPD emblem, fender flares, bronze-colored wheels, and bedside HPD graphics.

Ridgeline

Honda’s torque-vectoring all-wheel drive is now standard across the Ridgeline lineup. Up to 70 percent of the engine’s 262 lb-ft of torque is sent to the rear wheels, and it continuously allocates 100 percent of that torque between the left and right rear wheels based on driving conditions. Ridgeline’s standard AWD system further optimizes power delivery and distribution in various conditions, including snow, pavement, mud, and sand. Wringing out a Ridgeline test vehicle may be more fun than we imagined.

[Images: Honda]

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28 Comments on “2021 Honda Ridgeline: In Stores Now...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Honda: This exists!

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Honda needs some sort or hybrid or EV version…

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      FWIW, I really wanted a Ridgeline, but bought a GMC Sierra Hybrid instead.

      The Sierra cost less and towed more. Plus, the hybrid driving experience is nice very.

      Buying the hybrid instead of the more efficient (newer smaller truck) cost me some MPG and, as a green car hippie, that’d a big deal. But I’m working remotely so the MPG doesn’t have much of an effect on my overall household fuel consumption. …And this truck is just to get by until I can get one of the electric pick up trucks as a “forever truck” anyway.

      A hybrid or plugin Ridgleline might have beat out the GMC Sierra Hybrid. But my next truck will be an EV.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I really believe that if they offered this with a second bed option it would sell better. I dont like them but would be more serious in my look if it was an 8ft bed.

    • 0 avatar
      poltergeist

      No midsize truck currently on the market has an 8ft bed. Though if the Ridgeline offered a 6ft bed I would probably own one, because it does everything I need a truck to do otherwise.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I strongly object to this puff piece promoting a product assembled in a Deep Red State:
    https://www.270towin.com/states/Alabama

    Think of the Canadians. Please.

    [Extra credit: Before the Ridgeline was assembled in “Lincoln” (shivers), where was its assembly home?]

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Like pants with elastic waists, these will sell and to a certain clientele. When granny ladies like my mom determine that F-150s are a better value, Honda has problems.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I loved the Ridgeline when I drove it, but I ultimately bought a used GMC Sierra instead.

      I would have gladly paid about $20k for a used Ridgeline, but there weren’t any available at that price.

      So, I paid $15k for a GMC Sierra Hybrid luxury truck.

      I considered a new Ridgeline (and a lease), as well, but I just couldn’t justify the TCO over the 3 years I except to own my current truck.

      I plan to replace my current truck with an F-150EV or a Tesla Cybertruck. The Rivian and Hummer EV are also on my radar.

  • avatar
    wolfwagen

    I liked the 1st Gen Ridgeline even with the goofy c pillar/rear quarter panel shape. The previous version of the 2nd gen was a little too soft, but this one looks much better.It would be nice if the HPD trim came with 2 inch lift, bigger tires and more HP.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      First gen interior was great, exterior was wonky.
      Second gen interior is great for people that hate trucks, exterior looks like someone made a collage of Accord, Odyssey, Passport to mimic a truck.
      Ridgeline drives great and fulfills 90% of my truck needs. I just don’t care for the Ridgeline.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Don’t forget the perpetual Honda Bonus: A timing belt that fails “somewhere between 90k and 115k,” leaving you stranded, and either your wallet, or your engine: exploded. Somehow, the arrogant Honda gets a big pass on this.

    Albeit, this won’t apply to those who lease, or trade often, and can most afford it.

    Honda. We keep it simple: Keep Sending Us Money.

    • 0 avatar
      blppt

      Are they still using belts? I thought just about everybody had switched to chains.

      BTW, its pretty common knowledge that you should get the timing belt changed somewhere between 60-90K miles. I had several cars of multiple brands that had belts and interference designs.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      The belt is a maintenance item. A properly maintained Honda V-6 will not suffer a catastrophic belt failure. I know; I own an ’08 Pilot with 160K miles on it. One of the nice things about the Pilot is a maintenance minder that displays a series of codes to indicate what maintenance is due, not just that it’s time to change the motor oil.
      The key to the codes is in the owner’s manual, and you can reset them yourself if you’re a DIY-er. I have followed those religiously and have never had an unpleasant surprise.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        No. It is not. A timing belt, or chain, especially when off the radar for a typical consumer, is a company engineering choice for durability.

        Using your line of reasoning further, an engine exploding at 90k is a maintenance item.

        • 0 avatar
          blppt

          For what its worth, i’ve always agreed that the idea of putting a “designed wear” crucial item on an interference engine was remarkably bad planning. Especially when you basically have to tear down half the engine to change said crucial item, the expense and time required which would make the owner think twice about doing this expensive maintenance.

          But, lots of companies did it. Not just Honda, not by a long stretch.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      Many Hondas have had 90k timing belt replacement intervals for decades. The value proposition of their cars still stand up.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        Unless you do not spend an hour each day, understanding the engineering, like 99% of the car buying public. Then, it is called a situation of Honda Fing people who can least afford it.

    • 0 avatar
      poltergeist

      I’ve never seen a Honda J Series V6 have a catastrophic timing belt failure “between 90K and 115K”. Maintenance Minder usually calls for replacement around 110K miles, but I’ve seen many go well beyond that with no issues. I’d love to hear about all the “stranded” owners of “exploded” Ridgelines you know of. Of course I’ve only worked on Hondas as my profession for about 30 years so what do I know.

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        The complete lack of evidence of Ridgelines exploding only proves that there’s a massive conspiracy against those who are trying to expose Honda and the Japanese rubber lobby’s treachery!

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        Ok. Get specific to a certain Honda engine. I know of two people “in my lifetime” screwed by the hidden cost of a $1k timing belt, when engines today have a low percentage of internal failure caused by a non-typical replacement item. As a 30y tech, you make your best money on the non-expert single mom.

        • 0 avatar
          poltergeist

          I’d say the “hidden cost” of a timing chain failure is much worse, as I don’t think most/any manufacturers have a service interval for them. Chain guides and tensioners fail in many cars/trucks, often at fairly low miles. Moral is, if you don’t maintain your veh. as recommended by the manufacturer, it will probably have costly failures. A “single mom” doesn’t have to be an expert to follow the Maintenance Minder on a Honda, and if she does, the likelihood of it “blowing up” is slim to none.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I noticed on their newest OPE (lawn mower/pressure washer/etc) engines they have dumped the belt drive overhead cam design and gone back to an OHV design. Proving once again that LS is the answer!

      Maybe GM can share a 5.3 for the Ridgeline?

    • 0 avatar
      chaparral

      Hondas have had 7 year/ 100k mile timing belt change intervals since before I was born. I’ve never seen one break before then, even in competition use. Most of them are a 2-hour job plus $150 in parts and $20 worth of coolant, and in exchange the cam timing doesn’t change as the chain wears out.

      The next-generation ICEs are going back to belts for efficiency and timing accuracy reasons. If I were drawing up a new engine today it would have one timing belt driving the cams, water pump, oil pump, and alternator. It would have a 13:1-14:1 compression ratio, direct injection with one upstream injector to get rid of carbon buildup and cool the turbo, and be headless to get rid of the head-block interface, with an aluminum block and the company’s choice of surface treatment.

  • avatar
    bradfa

    It boggles me why Honda don’t offer a trim one up from the Sport trim with cloth heated seats for a few hundred dollars more on the Ridgeline or the Passport. There’s a trend with recent Honda vehicles to not offer cloth heated seats which is just a big disappointment for northern regions.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    So they make the track wider yet again, while I need the vehicle to become narrower in order to be considered for purchase. Thank you, Congress, for the CAFE formula! I suppose Americans voted for it, so there’s no much to be said, except that the guys who protested at Capitol really peed it down their collective leg by not burning the place to the ground.

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Hondas have had 7 year/ 100k mile timing belt change intervals since before I was born. I’ve never seen one break before then, even in competition use. Most of them are a 2-hour job plus $150 in parts and $20 worth of coolant, and in exchange the cam timing doesn’t change as the chain wears out.

    The next-generation ICEs are going back to belts for efficiency and timing accuracy reasons. If I were drawing up a new engine today it would have one timing belt driving the cams, water pump, oil pump, and alternator. It would have a 13:1-14:1 compression ratio, direct injection with one upstream injector to get rid of carbon buildup and cool the turbo, and be headless to get rid of the head-block interface, with an aluminum block and the company’s choice of surface treatment.

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