By on October 15, 2020

Honda

Hi gang! My name is Tim Healey, I am the managing editor of this here site, and I done goofed. Or may have, anyway.

Earlier this week, I wrote up the news about the 2021 Honda Accord, working off an embargoed press release. I wrote the draft Friday, put it into our content management system on Sunday evening, and set it to go live when the embargo lifted Monday morning.

While doing this, I either didn’t see the pricing and on-sale date info in the release somehow, or Honda updated later and I didn’t see it. So maybe I screwed up and missed two key details, or maybe not, but I’d like to make amends to you, the reader, by posting that info now. I’m doing this instead of updating the main post because that post is a few days old now and you’d likely not see the update.

Anyway, mea culpas aside, the refreshed Accord will start at $24,770, with hybrids starting at $26,370. That doesn’t include a destination and delivery fee of $955. Looking at trims of note: Accord Sport models will run $27,320, Sport SEs $28,720, and a top-trim Touring $36,700, all before D and D. A Sport 2.0T is $31,910 before destination, and a top-line Hybrid Touring is $36,240.

Key fuel-economy numbers are also out, and the most fuel-efficient non-hybrid Accord achieve 30/38/33 (mpg city/highway/combined) while most hybrids are at 48/48/48, except the Touring (44/41/43).

The 2021 Accord is on sale at dealers now.

[Images: Honda]

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35 Comments on “2021 Honda Accord Pricing: Under $25K to Start...”


  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    And unless you opt for the $32K Sport 2.0T… you’ll take your Accord – even a Sport – with a CVT. Honestly, why call it a Sport at all?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Probably because it’s sportier with the automatic.

      Fun fact: the automatic Accord with the 2.0T is faster with the manual. Same is true of the GTI, and any number of other performance cars.

      I love shifting for myself as much as anyone, but given how good automatics are these days, I think it might be time to stop the anti-automatic hate.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve Biro

        FreedMike… I think you’ve misunderstood my post. Unless you opt for the $32K Accord 2.0T — which has a 10-speed automatic — you have to take a CVT. Even other versions of the Sport. That’s what I’m complaining about. No version of the Accord is available with the manual as of the 2021 model year – not even the Sport 2.0T. CVT’s are not sporty. They may now work well enough for most — but they are not sporty.

        • 0 avatar
          johnds

          Given the take rate of pre 2020 models, I can understand why they are discontinuing the manual. What confuses me is they have the Sport Special edition, but its only offered with the 1.5 engine. That’s the cheapest model I would have purchased had it had the 2.0. Touring is the next available model with 2.0.

        • 0 avatar

          Modern automatics are pretty darn good. I can’t shift a manual as fast as a few I can name. Whoever programs the AMG versions got it right from highway running to tight backroads…even track day !

          CVT transmissions are just horrible. I’ve never driven one that was better than “meh”.

          I will not buy a CVT-nope, nada, no-a real automatic, yes, a manual, sure, but a CVT = No Sale.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “CVT transmissions are just horrible. I’ve never driven one that was better than “meh”.”

            I prefer either CVT, or manual.

            As an engineering type, a CVT is a better way to convert what the engine can do into something that can actually move a vehicle.

            I enjoy the skill and finesse required to drive manual transmission vehicles.

            Step-shift automatics have always annoyed me. When I first learned to drive, I could shift a manual better than 1980s analog-hydraulic logic could. Modern computer-controlled automatic transmissions are vastly improved, but every automatic shift prompts me to wonder if there’s a better way to do this.

            I’ve owned a couple of hybrids, and a Civic with a CVT. I like these cars better than regular automatics. I’ve driven a couple of EVs, and I like those *much* better than regular automatics.

            Given the choice between an automatic and a CVT, the CVT wins for me.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Given the choice between an automatic and a CVT, the CVT wins for me.”

            It’s your money. I can’t stand the Nissan and Subaru CVTs. I don’t much care for the Honda implementation either and the Jeep/Mitsubishi ones I found pretty bad too. Toyota’s is okay but I think I’d still prefer a “step-shift” automatic, which is by far my preferred transmission type.

            When I drove a Bolt I don’t recall having an issue with it, probably because EVs are quiet enough to cancel out the NVH characteristics I don’t like about most CVT vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @Steve:

          Ah, didn’t read your post carefully enough. I see what you mean.

      • 0 avatar
        dougjp

        Mike…..READ…..CTV! Who wants that? Nobody unless forced, desperate etc. Gotta read the whole post before responding, just saying.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’m very pro-automatic transmission but “quicker” is not the same as “sportier”.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          Exactly. Many people now drive cars with CVTs – it’s true. But that does not make them sporty. Most people drive SUV/CUVs now. That does not make them sporty, either.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Steve:

            I tried the Sport 2.0 with the 10-speed, and it behaved like a proper sporty family sedan. It’s a solid driver. The only thing I didn’t like about it was the seats (well, that, and having to look at that front end). You should try it out.

            Point definitely taken about CVTs, though.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          I am very sad to see the Accord manual go but I owned a 2015 Accord Sport with the six-speed manual for 5 years. In painful honesty, the Accord is not a sporty car even with a manual transmission. I ended up replacing it the spring with a 2020 Veloster N. Now That’s a sporty car. It rejuvenated my driving life!

          Again, very sad to see the manual Accord go. But it became kind of pointless.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Faster isn’t the point. I am not racing any of my cars. I prefer manual transmissions enough that I simply won’t buy a new car without one – I find automatics boring at best and usually infuriating. If that means I can’t buy new cars any more, the carmaker’s loss, not mine. No shortage of lovely used manual cars out there, and they are much, much cheaper.

        And the only thing worse than a traditional automatic is a belt-drive CVT.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Airliners are not sportier than a Miatas, no matter how much faster they may be. And neither do cars get more sporty when driven downhill than uphill.

    • 0 avatar
      missinginvlissingen

      “Sport” doesn’t mean anything in this context.

      When I was a tyke and my father brought home our new 1976 Buick LeSabre Custom, I asked him, Dad, what’s custom about this car? And he explained that nothing was custom, it’s just the name of a trim level.

      Same thing with “Sport”. It means “above the LX”.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      When this new Accord arrived, I jumped the gun to drive one and the only one the dealer had was the 1.5T version with the CVT. I had 30 minutes so figured why not.

      You could tell it was a CVT, but it wasn’t obvious. Honda did a MUCH better job at implementing their CVT than Nissan has done. The Nissan CVT, in every incarnation, is trash.

      Honda’s implementation is just tuned better. You don’t get the rubber band effect, or if you do, it’s much more subtle.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I won’t make any claims regarding the longevity of a Nissan CVT but we are averaging 30.9493 mpg combined in a Rogue, and its acceleration and driving characteristics are good enough that I just traded in a MT sedan for another Nissan product.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Yeah, our Outback and Rogue both have CVTs. Not sure what all the crying and foot stamping is about. It took me all of 10 minutes to get use to not feeling shift points and I haven’t thought about it since. The Outback has paddle shifters and the Rogue you use the shifter if you want to pretend your driving a manual. It’s fun for a couple of times but really just a novelty.

          Both have no problem jacking up to our standard 80 mph highway traffic here in Texas.

        • 0 avatar
          eng_alvarado90

          Just wondering what MT sedan you traded in? I had a 2010 Accord 4cyl with a MT and it was a blast.
          And

          • 0 avatar
            emineid

            I can confirm that. I have a 2010 Accord LX with a manual transmission. I put Michelin Pilot Sport 4 on it, and the Accord handles as nicely through the twisties as a BMW 440i or a Genesis G70. Also, the shift quality is better than a 2007 Porsche 911 with a manual transmission and way better than an E46 BMW. The true quality of engineering that went into an Accord family sedan is something that doesn’t get written about.

    • 0 avatar
      ABC-2000

      it’s about time for people to understand that “Sport”, in most cases, mean “low price”, see Mazda 6 Sport, Civic Sport.
      The case with the Accord, I had 2014 Sport and 2016 EX with the CVT and both were OK but I would not buy any of them with my own money.
      To be honest, I missed the feeling of a “normal” AT so I leased a 2018 EX-L, 2.0T with the 10 speed and after 2 years, all I can say is that I just love that car, unfortunately, Honda does not offer that combination anymore, meaning, 2.0T with 17″ wheels and navigation.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Every time I see an Accord of this generation i am consistently astounded by how big it is.
    While it’s only 7″ longer than the 1992 version, the styling does something that makes it look enormous.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      The styling reminds me of a 1950’s Hudson Hornet.

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      I’ve owned many Accords over the years and a lot of it has to do with safety. Neighbor of mine had a 91 Accord and it was a tin can that was cut in half during a crash years ago. Over several generations, the body has gotten safer and safer, while bigger for reasons I can only think that American’s want bigger cars. I’d rather be in a crash with a 2021 Accord than my old 1994 Accord.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Still has the same pointlessly fast roofline, guaranteeing difficult rear seat access and a tiny trunk opening. Push more buyers to the CRV I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      21 is just a minor refresh. The most radical update was 2006, but they didn’t change the shell of the car. 23/24 should be a full redesign if they still make Accords then.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        2023 should be the next full redesign of the Accord. If they renew it at all.

        The next Civic looks to be much more conservative-looking. If they would bring the interior fit and finish up to the level of the Accord, they could have a “one car fits all” thing, since the Civic is almost as big as the Accord.

      • 0 avatar
        eng_alvarado90

        Did you mean 2008? A 2006 was just a mild refresh of the 7th gen Accord.
        Both the 8th gen and 10th gen Accords have been the most radical updates to this day.
        I’ve been to many Accords and when I got my 2010 I just noted how big it was compared to every past generation

  • avatar

    How Tesla manages selling cars without grill and Honda cannot?

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    Current generation Accord is an incredible value. It will be sad if it falls victim to SUV craze and gets discontinued in 3 years.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d put my next paycheck on the Camry and Accord and Altima being safe. I also think Sonata is safe for now – it’s a brand new design. Passat probably does the zombie walk for a couple of years because VW just redid it and wants to milk whatever it can from an old platform.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I got my mitts on a 2.0T Accord Sport with the manual. The size was perfect for me and the transmission was pretty nice, but I couldn’t get it to work financially where I’d be comfortable enough to make the payments.

    I never tried the 1.5 because of the CVT, never a manual 1.5 in stock within 700 miles, and the internet talk of oil dilution issues. I didn’t want a dealer to do a trade on a car I might not buy, even though I wanted a test drive.

    Consequently, I’ve fallen into Mazda’s arms and am pretty happy all things considered.

    I more or less gave up on the idea of a manual because it’s an often enough occasion that I’m parked at the end of my driveway and out with friends. In those cases my mom would be stuck because she can’t drive a manual.

    When I finally manage to buy a house, and have enough disposable income to support another manual, I’ll find one. I’m not there yet, and have other priorities and I’m okay with it.

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