By on July 31, 2020

2015 Mazda3 Sport Touring, Image: Mazda

The thought of a parent spending any significant amount of money on a vehicle for their teen offspring leaves a bad taste in this writer’s mouth, but some families march to the beat of a different, more affluent drum. Yours truly believes a free hand-me-down wreck should be the absolute limit of parental generosity, and that’s only on the condition that they pay for all upkeep.

But loans from the Bank of Mom and Dad are definitely a thing, which gives them considerable say over what vehicle actually enters their kid’s life. With this in mind, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and Consumer Reports joined forces to craft a list of decently reliable, safe rides for parents on a budget.

Would your spawn be happy with any of these top choices?

The used rides range in price from roughly $5,000 to $20,000, selected due to their above-average reliability (over a majority of model years) and crashworthiness. Models with unusually high injury claims were tossed.

As the study states, “All listed vehicles earn good ratings in the IIHS moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests, as well as a good or acceptable rating in the driver-side small overlap front test. If rated by NHTSA, they earn 4 or 5 stars overall or 4 or 5 stars in the front and side tests under the old rating scheme.”

A quick perusal shows not one mention of the ’92-96 Toyota Camry four-cylinder — a car which would serve a young person well, right into adulthood and beyond. Alas, those are getting on in years.

What did show up on the list, and right at the very top of the affordability scale, is the 2014 (or newer) Mazda 3 sedan and hatchback and 2014 (or newer) Subaru Impreza, as well as the current-generation Hyundai Elantra GT and Kia Forte. Sensible choices for anyone, really. The Mazda, at an average of $7,000, serves as the cheapest top pick.

In the midsize field, the 2013-present Subaru Legacy and Outback top the list, joined by Honda Accords of the same age. The large car nod goes to the 2016 Hyundai Genesis.

If cargo capacity is more of a concern, the 2014-present Mazda CX-5 is a good choice, with older examples being the cheapest menu item on this small CUV list. The Buick Encore also ranks high for affordability, though some teens might recoil in horror at their parents’ choice. Well, tough luck, Brayden. Also on the list are the Chevrolet Equinox and Honda CR-V.

The 2014 or 2016-and-newer GMC Terrain is your cheapest bet in the “midsize” category, followed by the current-generation Kia Sorento. Looking to saddle junior with a minivan (which will inevitably turn into either a date-killer or a pregnancymobile)? Don’t waste your time looking at any offering from Fiat Chrysler. The best choices are all overseas jobs, with the current-gen Toyota Sienna topping the affordability list by a few hundred dollars.

Sure, there’s also a cheaper “good” list to add to the “best” ranking we just provided, but do you really want to look at vehicles that are less than ideal when you’re counting on your kids to fund your palliative care later in life? Tread cautiously with that wallet.

[Image: Mazda]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

60 Comments on “Buying a Car For Your Ungrateful Teen? Here’s a List...”


  • avatar
    texasjack

    My grandson just got a 2017 3 just like in the photo. Outstanding condition and had all the right safety features. Good choice for him.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Good slow cars are best or dad’s hand-me-downs, whichever works best. I gave my eldest my 4DSC Maxima, he was very grateful :)

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Last year the Bank of Dad helped fund my now 18 year old son’s purchase of a neighbour’s 2wd crewcab Colorado. It came with a complete set of Nokian Hakkapelita winters on rims. Just the 2 sets oftires were worth more than what he paid. It needed brakes which he did some of the work in his high school shop class. The problem was insurance. $1,800 dollars. He’s paying me back and we decided to put it all in his name so he can build a clean driver’s record.
      This spring he then went out and purchased a 1998 F150 on a 7 inch lift running 35’s and 5.30 front and rear lockers. His money and insurance. A buddy is a hardcore offroader. He took a 4×4 course through a local club and has mostly been supervised by me or some local offroaders.

      This June grandpa gave him his immaculate 1996 extended cab “Jelly bean” F150. That was another $1,800 loan from the bank of dad for insurance.

      I told him that the Colorado will become his brother’s ride once he gets a licence.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I am in this boat and will be looking in the coming year. The $7-8k range is all I can stomach spending on my young man as he becomes a new driver. I have been looking at local used car prices and found that in that price range, I am looking at cars that are roughly 7-10 years old with 100k to 130K on the clock. All of the top choices will be 4cyl, volume selling vehicles. Top among my choice for my son would be Honda CRV, Ford Fusion, Honda Civic, some Subaru Wagons. I have seen a few Camry’s and even a few Venza’s that I would also consider. Very few Mazda’s seem to be on sale in my price range. Talk me out of the Venza 4cyl, seems like the nicest car for the money, havent really read up on it. I would assume it is a discounted price though as the model was discontinued, but perhaps that will change with the recent resurrection of of the name.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      A couple of places to look for a good value on a kids first car are publicsurplus.com and govdeals.com where govts auction off all sort of surplus.

      Depending on the agency they may post all service records, a link to them or have them available for viewing with the vehicle. What is available in your area of course will vary but it isn’t uncommon to find Fusions, Camrys and Civics and of course trucks trucks and more trucks.

      Most of the people buying there are dealers who are aren’t looking to pay more than wholesale so prices are usually pretty reasonable. Yeah you won’t usually find high trim models, unless it is a seizure that they are auctioning off and you do occasionally see those too.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Yeah, you just gotta know someone that’s got a drug dog that can sniff the car for you, in case the CBP guys missed something at the international checkpoint. Lol.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yeah don’t want to get popped for what the police didn’t catch the first time around.

          I’ve seen a couple of interesting cars come through that had been seized.

          One was 62-4 Chevy in full low rider form and from what I could tell in the pictures the custom paint was excellent. The interesting thing about that one was that they had built a stash box in the driver’s floor board area. The carpeting was all nicely finished and there was a set of fitted matching carpeted mats over top of it all. The even included pictures of the underside of it hanging down. Looked like it was set up to carry a hand gun, but certainly could have been used for drugs as well. The selling agency had a stipulation that the buyer had to remove the stash box within 30 days of purchase and present it for verification.

          I don’t remember the exact model of the next one, but it was a 2 row SUV where they had unbolted the seat and crudely cut a hole with a sawzall to make a fairly large stash box under that and reinstalled the carpet and seat over it. The funny thing about that one was that there was that the rear window had a large sticker promoting presumably previous owner’s Personal Trainer business, complete with the website address and phone number and whoever took the pictures showed it clearly.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      @thegamper

      We almost bought a very clean Super White 2005 Camry LE with 110k, for $5,500, at a local Sonic Auto Group-owned Honda dealer. It was an LE trim, but had leather, a moonroof, and alloy wheels, the timing belt had just been done, and it was very nice. But talk about ungrateful – Daughter No. 2 balked at driving a “granny car”, so we missed out on that one. Someone else had tried to buy it, but their financing fell through. After we passed on it, the same buyer came back with cash and bought it.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        I guess times are different…in 1988, I was grateful to get my sister’s 1978 Plymouth Arrow as a hand-me-down. I would never have dreamed of complaining to my dad, regardless of what kind of car it was. Fast forward to 2008, and my son was on the receiving end of a 1997 Toyota Tercel (which, to his credit he drove well beyond his years at the AF Academy and into his military career before it met a very untimely end in a meeting with a merging semi. Point is…I guess I don’t understand how the child drives that first buying action. My 14-year old daughter will be getting a car in four years when she goes off to college and while I won’t necessarily go out of my way to buy her a dud, since I am buying, that final decision will be mine. Granted, she only recognizes VW Beetles…lol

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        I guess times are different…in 1988, I was grateful to get my sister’s 1978 Plymouth Arrow as a hand-me-down. I would never have dreamed of complaining to my dad, regardless of what kind of car it was. Fast forward to 2008, and my son was on the receiving end of a 1997 Toyota Tercel (which, to his credit he drove well beyond his years at the AF Academy and into his military career before it met a very untimely end in a meeting with a merging semi. Point is…I guess I don’t understand how the child drives that first buying action. My 14-year old daughter will be getting a car in four years when she goes off to college and while I won’t necessarily go out of my way to buy her a dud, since I am buying, that final decision will be mine. Granted, she only recognizes VW Beetles…lol

    • 0 avatar
      amwhalbi

      I’ve got a 2010 Venza that is ticketed in less than a year for my oldest granddaughter. Got it used 5 years ago with 54,000 miles on it, and it now is still running perfectly at 72,000. It’s a base 4 cylinder with AWD, and both dad and grandpa think it should work very well as a kid’s first transportation vehicle. Only downside (upside?) is I have to go buy something else for myself, but my granddaughter is totally worth it.

  • avatar
    Zotz

    Sorry, but only a *grateful* teen deserves a Mazda 3.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Back in my day, if you were lucky enough to have your parents purchase or help you to purchase a used car, it was generally the biggest, slowest vehicle they could find. Chev and Pontiac sedans with 6 cylinder engines being the most popular.

    If you bought one yourself, depending upon your price range and inclination it would either be a ‘beat up’ muscle/pony car or an air cooled VW.

    As for your pricing, that certainly does not apply to the cost of used cars in Canada. We generally’pay through the nose’ for used cars up here. In any really ‘cheap’ or older models rust can be a major concern, including brake and fuel lines. Plus in Ontario the mandatory safety inspection is now more than just a cursory check.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Arthur Dailey – My dad co-funded my brother’s first vehicle. A new ’77 Chevy pickup but my dad had veto rights on drivetrain. Much to his protestations he got a 250 inline six mated to an automatic with 3.05 gears and a 4×2. That truck was perfect for him. Nothing ever went wrong with it.

      My dad must have trusted me more. I got full and complete access to our 1968 2 door Galaxie 500 with 4 barrel, duel exhaust, 390 Fe. That beast had 10.5:1 compression ratio and 315 hp stock.

  • avatar
    BunkerMan

    My son actually saved up for his first car, and bought it this past weekend. It’s an ’07 Rabbit 5-door. It’s in relatively good shape, but needs a couple of minor things. He was lucky to get a Wolfsburg built VW, which probably explains the shape it’s in. Relatively low mileage too (168k kms).

  • avatar
    FAS

    I just did this for my twins, one is a girl,. one is a boy…got a 4 cyl Venza and a 4 cyl Xterra manual trans…$15k for both….

    Done!!

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      4 cyl Venza has a deadly flaw

      • 0 avatar
        Yankee

        What is the “fatal flaw”? Never worked on one.

        • 0 avatar
          amwhalbi

          Yes, I obviously would be curious to know, Slavuta. What type of fatal flaw occurs, perhaps after 100K miles? So far, it has been extremely reliable with just regular maintenance.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            amwhalbi,

            yes. At 100K you’ll start to notice oil disappearing, visibly. But give it another 20K, it will be fill-up often. By 125K, you will be tired filling it up.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            ajla,

            1AR-FE engine, used in Venza/Highlander. I spoke to the dealer. There is no fix. Bad design. Dealers are well aware.

            Same issue had Camrys with 2AR-FE engines – 2.5L version of 2.7L 1AR engine.

            And this is a different issue from AZ engines – quote: “[AZ] engine consumes oil quiet significant due to the wrong piston rings design for North American Toyota models. Oil consumption usually starts after 45-50k miles. ”

            AR engines have a main flaw with modified combustion cycle, when oil on the cylinder wall is exposed to heat from the explosion. Eventually stuff becomes clogged and oil consumption becomes uncontrollable.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          The engine that @ around 100K starts burning oil, and by 120K – drinks it

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The 4-cylinder used in the Venza was a part of the AR engine family. I’m not familiar with them having bad oil consumption problems.

            Now the AZ engine family definitely does have that issue.

          • 0 avatar
            amwhalbi

            Thanks for the heads up, Slavuta. Since it is a 2010 with only 72K miles on it, I’m 95% sure either I or my granddaughter will be done with it before it hits 100K. But we will keep an eye on it to see if we have oil leak problems.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    When I’m faced with this decision, there will be two major points:

    1) Safest body structure I can reasonably afford. Putting the people most likely to get into accidents into the least structurally sound vehicles as a way of teaching them responsibility is stupid. I’ve already spent a lot of money keeping this kid alive this long; I’m not going to throw it all away because I’m ornery.

    2) Take out all the seats but the driver’s seat. Aside from alcohol, the worst thing you can put in a kid’s car is another kid! Source: I was a kid once.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    Ha! I’m from a different generation. Back when I was a teen wanting a car, my dad said “Go buy one”. I did…..a 1952 Ford flathead needing a rod bearing. 50 bucks. Couple of bucks for a bearing and pan gasket and I was good to go.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Back when I came of driving age most of my peers got the old hand me downs when dad, mom, or a grandparent got a new car for themselves.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The phrase “Ungrateful Teen” sounds like your choice should be punishment for them. A Terrain would definitely be punishment, and it’s the parent who would be punished, by repair bills.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Our max spend per car has been $7k, and our two driving age daughters (the oldest about to start her third year of college, six hours away, and the next getting ready to start at a nearby college), drive a 2012 Kia Forte Koup SX, and a 2014 Kia Forte LX with the Popular Package (power windows, alloy wheels, etc.). The Koup was $6,995 with 107k miles, and the Sedan was $5,700, with 120k.

    The Fortes have been decent cars – the Koup has 141k on it now, and the Sedan just 122k (thanks to COVID), and OEM parts for Kias are for the most part dirt cheap.

    P.S. Screw WordPress. I went to post this, then was told I need to login (I *was* logged in). Had to hit the Back button, copy and paste my comment into Notepad, refresh, login again, and copy and paste back from Notepad. Gah!

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Yeah, I would go for a previous gen Mazda3 for my kid as well. Modern so that the frame is safe in a crash, has enough YouTuber cred so that it’s sporty enough, but isn’t actually that fast so that it’s not irresponsible. It’s almost as if you were tricking them into a safe and practical car by wrapping it in the guise of a “performance car”.

    Thanks auto journalists!

  • avatar
    Jon

    An “ungrateful” teen in my family receives a bicycle or builds their own vehicle. Both have the effect of making the teen grateful.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Jon – my dad had a trucking business. If my brother and I were jerks he’s have us doing repairs or have us in the gravel box with a tiger torch and pick-ax chipping out frozen gravel in -35C weather.

      Both my sons are good. If a parent does a good enough a job of raising them without spoiling them they shouldn’t be ungrateful of anything by the time they are old enough to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        As the oldest child, once I turned 13 My Old Man never again touched a lawnmower, snow shovel, paint brush, etc. As soon as I got my license it was my responsibility to have his car washed inside and out, every weekend, 52 weeks per year.

        He also believed that if we did everything ourselves (DIY) then most of the population would be out of work and we would be back to a bartering society. Better to earn more per hour than the people you hire. That allows you to hire specialized trades, while you are out ‘earning’.

        For him that was easy, for me not so much.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    If my kids were to gripe about their vehicles, I would simply point out that my nicest newest vehicle is older than theirs, and has significantly more miles. :-)

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I think my grandson (just turning 14) would look good in a few years in a V6 Mustang. They seem fairly cheap 10 yr old / 100k miles. Is the insurance prohibitive?

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I cannot grok.

    My first car was a 12 year old Aerostar, for which I paid $750. I worked 2 summers at Tree Trust to save up for my driver’s education class, behind the wheel sessions, first car and some insurance. I had absolutely no expectation that my parents would drop any money on a car, or insurance for that matter.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Probably the best way.

      I knew that I stood to inherit a 1978 Cutlass Salon 2-door from my aunt, and my parents picked up my first insurance payment and first tank of gas. After that, it was my problem!

      • 0 avatar
        Dilrod

        My first was a 62 Ford Fairlane that I saved up a hard earned $600 for. I learned a lot about the limits of old cars the hard way.

        I believe it is an important right of passage for every young man to be stuck on a rural road at midnight, with steam pouring out from under the hood, no phone, and wondering “what do I do now?”

  • avatar
    deanst

    I’m in the process of giving my daughter a 2009 Astra as she goes to med school. Don’t know what she will eventually get to replace it, as she’s never driven an automatic!

  • avatar
    geo

    My daughter badly needed a used car to replace her worn-out 2006 Accord and had her heart set on a used Mazda 3. They’re everywhere in Calgary, but always seem to have rust or a manual transmission; both unacceptable to her. I found a base 2010 last week in our price range and bought it. Since it’s from BC it’s rust-free. She’s thrilled with it and has been driving it everywhere. She loves the interior, how it drives and holds the road, and she loves the “smile” the front fascia gives.

    I’m impressed with the car and might start looking for one for myself. Maybe a 2015 or newer.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      When my son crashed my old Protege, I fixed it myself but I saw parts rusted through and I said, I am selling it, it is not safe for him if he keeps bumping into other cars.
      I had 2011 ‘3. I was so happy with it that I was looking for the same car. I’ve purchased 2010 iTouring with manual, a 5yo car with 75K miles. Right now this car has about 160K miles and I’ve spent $120 in repairs + normal maint, no oil being burnt. Best, most reliable car known to the world. My 2011 has ~90K miles, no problems yet.

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    The first car I drove had 59bhp, two doors (three door in Europe; a hatch), a five speed, only four seats, and the cassette player had one button (push halfway to go forward, all the way in to eject). Three buttons for the radio. It was a 99, it had cost $10,000 new, if that, and was worth no more than $5000 when I started driving it.

    The first car I owned was a ’98 Civic, 1.4 litres, five speed, 89bhp. Five door hatch. It was worth $1000 due to the mileage, even though it was only in 2004. It lasted me three more years and another 40,000 miles before I had to trade it because a steering repair was 10x what the car was worth.

    I can not imagine dropping $20,000 on a car for my kids when they can drive. It’ll be old, safe, boring and mostly reliable. There will be one car for the two kids to share, and they will pay the gas. If they want to go road-tripping we will work out what car costs they take over while they’re away. Would love it to be a manual, but no chance of that by the time they can drive. It’s the cars being sold today that’d be the 10 year beaters by the time they’re ready, so unless I’m getting them a Crosstrek it’ll probably have to be an auto.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      I wouldn’t necessarily cross off manuals from the list. You can still buy safe econocars like Civic and Corolla with MTs. 10 year old versions of those cars are nowhere near beater status.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      When I was in high school the parking lot was full of late model German cars, late model luxury Japanese cars and a smattering of newer, cheaper cars. I remember one of my classmates got a brand new Audi A6 when he marked the oh so difficult milestone of turning 16 and getting a license. I doubt he was pitching in for anything, working 20 hours a week at a local teen friendly job.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I’ve come around to the idea that between borrowing my car, using an electric bike and using Uber, that the rationale and financial good sense may mean not getting a kid a car.

    It’s so expensive to run an extra car just with insurance or buying a used car and baking in repairs and maintenance that it doesn’t seem worth it.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I bought a 2000 GMC Sierra 4X4 for the oldest kid a few months ago for CDN$1500. The seller, obviously knowing nothing about cars, thought that it was a V6 due to its sluggishness. Plugs/wires/filters cured that. The sweet little 4.8L not only came with factory PosiTrac but with the 4:10 rear end, too. He’s been on the tools with me – which was a dictum – but we’ll pick up the insurance for the time being. The gas is on him.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I just bought an 08 Rabbit from a friend for $3000, for my grateful teen. He’ll use it for college needs. It’s a stick, so he got to learn!

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      Sweet ride. Our oldest wants to haul dirt bikes and bush camp so a truck was ideal. Were we citiots he would have gotten a small manual VW, ideally ( mostly so that I could rip around in it ).

  • avatar

    When I got my license in 2003 I was bequeathed my mother’s 1993 Toyota Preview LE All-Trac with 155,000 or so miles on it. I protested and was told quite clearly that I drove the Previa or nothing at all. I drove the Previa for a year and a half or so when my mom finally broke my dad down for something safer and he bought me and my sister a 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe. The SF became mine alone in 2008 and left us in late 2010 with almost 150k on it. I miss that car….

  • avatar
    B-BodyBuick84

    HAHA! Not me, but a buddy of mine, whose parents knew absolutely nothing about cars, fell in love with this decrepit wreck that had been slumbering under a carport for the past 25 or so years. He bought it and worked out a deal with our auto shop teacher where he was able to store it at the shop and learn how to wrench on it. Being a budding gearhead myself, I helped him out on quite a few things. It wasn’t until graduation that his parents found out he owned a a car. They were a really eco-friendly sort who preferred public transit and busing, and were quite shocked to find out that he owned a 1968 Dodge Polara sedan with a factory 440 ci V8 and tow package (3.23 posi diff, heavy duty suspension and cooling). We had a lot of fun in that car. Not to shabby for a first ride. All we had to do to it was rebuilt everything :)

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Daughter got a very used Fusion when she started driving. Fast forward three years. Mom shows up and announces no sorority girl should drive one of those nasty Fusions. They came back from the Ford dealer with a Mustang GT convertible. Her brother started driving about the same time his sis got her Mustang. El Scotto SR, aka the Old Fighter pilot was ready to trade in his Suburban. Dad wanted to give it to El Scotto III. The old Suburban lasted him through high school, undergrad, and grad school. Both kids were explicitly told grades go down, your ride gets parked. Grades stayed great and insurance stayed eye popping. Fast forward to today; daughter drives a 1 series convertible and son drives a lifted suburban that he had brought from my dad.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Actually I think there are 3 criteria for that first car if you are providing it.
    1. Slow
    2. Adequate but not sporty handling
    3. Significant mass

    IMO that excludes sporty sedans like the Mazda 3, Civic or H/Ks
    I could get behind the CUV/small SUV suggestions or older large sedans like Camry, Sonata or 4 cylinder Accord.
    If they want a vehicle to impress their friends no problem. Buy it and insure it themselves.
    At that age my children got used Volvo 245 and 945 wagons which took them past college and did not seem to be a problem for them.

  • avatar
    Yankee

    I guess I’m in the cheap seats, but when my daughter starts driving next year there is no way I’m spending $7 to $10k on a car I know she’s going to scrape and bash like every other kid does. She’s a good kid, but my two sons each totaled two cars after ignoring everything I taught them. (Son #2 totaled both cars passing on the right!) I made my kids the same deal my old man made me: I’ll help you buy it and you can stay on my insurance as long as you are responsible. Once they started getting speeding tickets I kicked them both off. Son #1 is responsible now and on his own with a newly purchased Kia Forte GT manual. Son #2 no longer owns a car because dad has stopped subsidizing his stupidity. That being said, I do want something safe under my daughter, so I’m not giving her my 2006 Scion xb with no side airbags. Thinking of something like a first generation Kia Soul, which has the full compliment of airbags and can be had for $5k or less. I like Toyota or Honda myself, but they are prohibitively expensive for something decent for a first driver. I figure, let her bash up a Kia that breaks every now and then (and that dad can fix cheaply) so that she appreciates it when she owns a good car someday.

  • avatar
    REAL_sluggo

    Mr. Williams,

    Are you havin’ a laff??
    The very premise that a Parent would buy their offspring, who(m) are supposedly “ungrateful”, is quite remarkable… And foretelling: That type of parenting is exactly where Pajama Boys/Girls come from. It’s why youth do not respect their Parents. It’s why children live at home well into their late 20’s and early 30’s.

    Tough Love is the key to exercising YOUR backbone without being a Dictator or Authoritarian.
    Find said backbone, grab your chav and ascertain if you actually have a set, and raise your child to be self-sufficient and INDEPENDENT. Sally forth into REALITY

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I hope you’re kidding, because parents have been helping their kids get cars since cars became a thing. Not all kids who get a helping hand turn out to be ungrateful, spoiled brats

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    One of the last comments on this bringatrailer.com entry, apparently from the winning bidder, states that this will be “a young man’s first car!” https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1993-mazda-mx-6-ls-v6/

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • DenverMike: It’s just a theory. Except suppose they go directly from entry level Fords to entry BMWs? Or entry...
  • MKizzy: Sounds like this road will serve as a test case for the “road of the future.” If engineers cannot...
  • Superdessucke: Not to brag but I’ve been saying Ford, FCA, and GM made a big mistake abandoning low cost cars....
  • Superdessucke: Correct. An unreliable Fiesta could knock him right off the straight and narrow. No one likes paying...
  • Superdessucke: This is most famous as the car John Travolta recorded crashing in the 1981 movie Blow Out.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber