By on June 26, 2020

gm

“Lear-ick” or “lear-eek”? That’s the first question the Cadillac Lyriq brings to mind, the second being who, exactly, was behind the naming of this future electric crossover. Names matter, and if they don’t roll off the tongue easily, that’s a problem. At least for non-Italian brands…

But this writer digresses. On Thursday, which proved quite eventful in terms of product news, Cadillac decided to seek a little limelight of its own.

Specifically, it reminded the public that there is indeed an electric crossover on the way, and that we’ll have our first glimpse of a real, physical product on August 6th. The debut is more of a prelude, however, as Cadillac says it plans to reveal a “show car” that day. Be it a concept, a prototype, or a pre-production facsimile of what we can expect in showrooms, it’s at least something less ephemeral than the renderings shown at last year’s North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

gm

gm

Named Lyric, the crossover will be just one EV riding GM’s big green wave. The company now has a platform and battery tech to underpin and power the Lyric and vehicles like it, as well as an assembly plant focused solely on such products. Detroit-Hamtramck has seen its last internal combustion sedan.

The few glimpses Cadillac provided of the actual Lyric (not close-ups of cool Escalade gear designed to burnish the brand’s future-gazing cred) can be seen above; after a bit of lightening, we can see that this vehicle fits the description of what we’ve come to expect from a show car. A physical representation of the rendering, not something’s ready to leave the oven.

According to the accompanying ad, only a Cadillac EV can “move you.” Hmmm. Debatable.

Image: GM

Seen from the side, the Lyric looks like something that drove off the set of RoboCop (hopefully it stacks up to foreign rivals better than the 6000 SUX), though the shots of the car’s lower front fascia jibes with the renderings seen early last year (one of which is shown above).

It’s expected that the Lyriq will enter production next year, going on sale as a 2022 model. General Motors CEO Mary Barra said in May that EV development programs continued amid the pandemic lockdowns, with no changes in store for the Lyric’s production schedule. More details should be forthcoming in early August.

[Images: General Motors]

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52 Comments on “Prelude to a Preview: Cadillac Lyriq Continues Its Long March to Reality...”


  • avatar
    el scotto

    Electric whiskers and gun slit lights? The green house resembling something cribbed (stolen) from an Audi/Porsche SUV? Naw, ain’t happening. Instead, GM will stuff a perfectly fine Buick full of batteries and slap Cadillac badges all over it. It will have a newton meter badge on the back door. That badge will also represent its percentage of depreciation every year.

  • avatar

    I live in a condo without a garage. I have no place to charge an electric vehicle. I will never buy one. I think a lot of people will not buy one. I also think a lot of these companies that are going all out on these electric vehicles are going to regret their decisions to waste so much money on something that only a small percentage of the population will find practical.

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      I tend to agree with you, but I still wonder…….

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      You can just drive to the dark corner of that supermarket parking lot where the charging station is. As long as a delivery truck isn’t there, you’ll be able to sit peacefully for a few hours while it charges. What’s the problem?

      • 0 avatar

        “What’s the problem?”

        If it sits there for hour(s) – the high probability that it will be vandalized.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @dwford: “What’s the problem?”

        That is not the truth. Just BS propaganda. A quick charge station will get the job done in about 30 minutes or less. There are about 95 million single-family homes. You also don’t need a garage. That’s another myth. Yes, there are some living situations where it would be a problem, but plenty of other situations where it would work out. You have to look at your individual situation.

        • 0 avatar

          I don’t want to sit at a “quick charge” station for 30 minutes to recharge the EV I am never going to buy, even if I could find one. I can go to any gas station and refuel my ICE vehicle in less than 5 minutes.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @mjz: I totally understand. I know lots of people that for numerous reasons an EV just won’t work. More reasons than ever get mentioned here. For a lot of people, they work out really well. Much easier than an ICE. It all depends on where you live and your personal situation. Just like with vehicle types where some can live with a Corvette, but some people might need a Suburban. Now it extends to powertrains. For a short commute in an EV, a simple outdoor 120v outlet might work. But, that’s not going to work for someoone that has to drive a lot of miles.

            For me, I have plenty of cheap power at home and my longest commute has 50+ charging ports in the parking lot. I have a 60 amp capable level 2 charger. The next car will be able to make that longest commute 2.5 to 3 times without a charge. The part that I like is that I always have a vehicle fully fueled almost every time I get into the car. Those “5-minute” fuel stops are more like 10 minutes since I would have to go out of my way and fight traffic in and out of the gas station. I also don’t have to stand outside freezing pumping gas into the car.

            As I said, it works for some people and not for others. With a good 300 to 400-mile range EV and access to a V3 250kW supercharger, some people could easily get by without home charging. For others, I realize it’s not always an option.

        • 0 avatar

          Hey MCS. Don’t get me wrong. I think EV’s are great vehicles. Glad that your situation allows you to enjoy one. My concern is that I see some of the automakers going all in on being TOTALLY EV ONLY soon (VW, GM). And I think that may prove to be a fatal mistake.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Yeah. We put a man on the moon, a vehicle the size of a Crown Victoria on Mars, sent a probe to Pluto and are actively exploring Interstellar Space with a probe launched way back during the first year that the Ford F Series claimed the #1 sales crown but you are probably right, figuring out a means to charge an EV at an apartment is just a bridge too far.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        My solution would be to put metered NEMA 14-50 outlets that are common in campgrounds into the parking spaces at apartments. Then, the owners could use portable level 2 chargers to plug-in. NEMA 14-50 campground outlets are a great lower-cost alternative to full charging stations and less maintenance. I’m surprised they aren’t more common. It could be a nice extra income stream for landlords.

        • 0 avatar
          Bill Wade

          Owning an RV I can say probably 50% of those outlets are bad at campgrounds all over the country.

          I can just see apartments maintaining them. They won”t even change light bulbs in the common areas.

      • 0 avatar

        It’s not that it can’t be done. It’s that it just doesn’t NEED to be done. I am perfectly happy with my ICE vehicle. As I think the majority of people are. If an EV fits your lifestyle then I say go for it, but I will never buy one unless our future “One World Government” mandates it. And don’t think they won’t. Look at California, now mandating zero emission trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      here4aSammich

      You are applying today’s reality to tomorrow’s problem. What’s to stop a developer from giving a future development assigned parking and charging infrastructure? Shouldn’t really be that hard to tie it in to each condo’s meter so that the user pays for what they use. Retrofitting your current home might be more difficult, but it’s certainly not impossible. It’s not going to be needed in someplace like Iowa anytime soon, but I could see it being well received in places that have more EV take, like California. Fewer Californians using gasoline means more for the rest of us. But not gonna lie, I’ve thought about finding a gently used Nissan Leaf as a grocery getter and first car for me soon to be teen driver. Even here in the midwest.

      • 0 avatar

        WHO exactly do you think is going to get stuck PAYING for any infrastructure changes to my condo’s parking lot to install charging stations? It will be ME. And I don’t want it. That is a problem in today’s reality, as well as tomorrow’s.

        • 0 avatar
          spookiness

          Condo owner/dweller here also. EV doesnt suit my needs at the current time, but I suspect that in 10 years if my association doesnt have some basic EV charging infrastructure in place then we all will have saddled ourselves with housing with about as much market appeal as a house with no ability to accommodate A/C or internet.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What “infrastructure”? It’s 10X more involved in putting a single solar panel on the condo’s roof. Never mind the solar “red tape”, fees inspections and other BS.

            The electrical conduit may not be the prettiest or they’ll may cut some concrete. Oh wow. I’m sure there’s existing exterior conduit or other mods not on the original building or parking lot.

            It could be upgraded AC, security lights, power gates, key pads, whatever. It’s not the end of the world, the sky is falling, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      I think some condos will run the conduit and wiring for chargers. The (their) HOA’s will demand it. Yes, you will pay for it. The question is will you get your money back when you sell. I have three assigned (and paid for) parking spacesv. A reserved for you 24/7/365 parking space with a charger will be a selling point. I live in the western DC suburbs near Dulles airport. There are plenty of charges withing a 10 minute drive of my house. Even my local Walmart is getting one. My neighbor charges his Tesla at the local strip mall. The strip mall has the usual suburban debris of supermarket, dry cleaners, evil place that serves coffee that is more bitter than ex-wifes heart, and some nice restaurants. Charging is not that much of a hassle and no the area is not the lease bit unsafe. Chargers may be like ATMs, you may not like them, you may not need them, the only debate is how much you will be charged for them.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        You’re already getting reimbursed by “EV”. But how much are you guessing it would cost? I just finished running 230 Volts, wiring it from scratch and for 50 ft down the side of my dad’s house (AC upgrade) and spent $80, having half the parts/material on hand (no special tools). So a pro may hit you for $500?

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        That’s the thing if you charge away from home you’ll pay through the nose. I recently watched a review from a guy who had rung up ~44k miles on his model 3. He said charging at super chargers made up about 10% of the miles driven. His cost for energy for those 44k miles was about $600 worth of electricity at home and $200 worth at Superchargers. His at home cost was about 1.5 cents per mile. Supercharging cost him 4.5 cents per mile. Which isn’t that bad considering in my area the public charger is 4x what I pay at home.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Some of us appreciate fine craftsmanship. I have been saving for the purchase of a Fabergé imperial egg, but might just obtain a Lyriq first. Sniff.

  • avatar
    dwford

    THIS is why Ford named it’s EV the Mustang Mach E. Literally no one cares about this vehicle.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Looks a little like the Byton EV:
    https://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/bytonHERO_200105018CES.jpg

    Good luck to Cadillac.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Tesla killer?

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    The name sounds like a pharmaceutical with a long list of side effects.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    The guy at the center of the Venn diagram of:

    – wants a Cadillac
    – wants a crossover with a sloping roof and minimal cargo utility
    – wants an electric vehicle

    …is going to be stoked.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The side effect are an empty wallet, expensive batteries, rapid depreciation, and owner depression for having bought one in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @jeffs: So why would the wallet be empty??? Expensive batteries? Why does that matter, they come with the car and they aren’t as expensive as they used to be. Rapid depreciation seem to be limited to the Leaf and some other early EVs. For good reason too. Tesla’s and other modern EVs don’t seem to have that issue.

      Owner depression? Maybe you should actually take the time to drive one of the better modern EVs. Performance is much better than an ICE. They’re quiet, smooth, and you don’t have a downshift when you put it to the floor. They also don’t have the torque lag that ICE cars have.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    The 6000 SUX was a seriously tarted-up GM Colonnade, probably a’76-‘77 Cutlass—you can see a good shot of the dashboard a couple times in the movie.

  • avatar
    Ryan

    A coworker of mine once told me “ Cadillac and Harley owners are one in the same. They are the only people that think what the drive/ride is something special.” After years of first hearing him say this. I believe he is correct. I’ll never understand either of their “appeal”. Good luck Caddy and HD, I doubt you’ll be in business in 20 years.

  • avatar
    shipping96

    You people would have bemoaned leaving caves and switching out of whale oil.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “Fire is idiotic. Who wants to stop and cook their meat”

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      shipping96, Touche’. But if Cadillac were a caveman, they would have futuristic drawings of the outside world on the wall of the cave, make periodic feints toward leaving the cave, but spend 98% of their time in the deepest recess of the cave (talking big about the mastodon that Grandpa allegedly took down).

  • avatar
    dwford

    Personally I think it would’ve been smarter to take the new Hummer EV platform and make that into an Escalade EV. The Escalade is the only Cadillac with and brand cache, and you could easily attach an EV version to the name and people would buy it.

  • avatar
    ttiguy

    yeah an Escalade EV. Maybe they’ll think of doing that someday…..

  • avatar

    Lyriq (rap music?) is a strange name for the car, like Melody for example. Lyriq and Melody go together. Just an idea how to name the next Cadillac.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Will Cadillac dealers mark these up 15k like some of the Ford dealers are doing on preorders for the new electric Mustang?

  • avatar

    it won’t matter how good it is, marketing will destroy it as always.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Yes, instead of showcasing the luxury advantages that come with EV ownership – no yucky gas stations, silent cruising, the Lyriq commercials will feature smiling millennials cruising the night life like every Cadillac owner never.

      “The Cadillac of Electric Vehicles” would’ve been an easy tag line for a special vehicle, but not for this generic crossover with probably zero unique selling features.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @dwford: Like those dare greatly ads. The one with the woman driving the wrong way in traffic. Like, what’s wrong with her.

        youtube.com/watch?v=f_aQCFgXcEY

        I think the platform underneath is good, but GM being GM will screw it up somehow.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree GM seems to fall flat when it comes to marketing if they market it at all. GM failed miserably marketing the Impala and Lacrosse and yes I realize large sedans have lost market share but GM didn’t even try. Both the Impala and Lacrosse are among the best vehicles GM has made in years and with an effective marketing campaign they would have done better against comparable Japanese and even comparable German cars. Many car buyers didn’t even know these cars existed.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Another black hole to shove money into.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    Well, we know it won’t be any good according to this website or the commentariat, since (a) it is from GM and (b) it has a Cadillac badge. Hence it is like nuclear fusion, theoretically possible but virtually impossible to accomplish in reality according to folks here.

    Slap a Hyundai or Honda badge on it though, and watch the tide turn instantly..

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