By on March 4, 2020

gm

General Motors offered up a peak at its electric vehicle strategy in Warren, Michigan Wednesday, pulling the sheet back on a product plan that seeks quick profits as well as CO2 reduction.

Underpinning GM’s drive for domestic EV supremacy is a piece of modular architecture and a new battery type that should proliferate through divisions and segments in the coming years. The company claims these vehicles will not be the equivalent of the defunct, unloved Fiat 500e, a compliance vehicle that late Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne once warned consumers not to buy. Despite the EV game carrying steep costs and significant risk, GM’s not in the business of losing money if it can help it.

Oh, and that upcoming Cadillac crossover now has a name.

While we can’t give you a full rundown of future bodystyles and nameplates (it’s likely even GM brass aren’t exactly sure how far the company will take this), there is info to share on that. First, let’s look at the bones of these future models.

The platform is a third-generation modular unit, designed to underpin as many vehicles as possible and thus leverage economies of scale to pare down costs. Propulsion, part of which is a new proprietary battery design GM calls “Ultium,” aims for a minimum of complexity and maxed-out flexibility. The battery tech allows GM and its joint venture partner, LG Chem, to either stack the pouch-shaped cells or place them in line, allowing for a broad range of battery sizes and shapes.

gm

Those cells are low in costly (and contentious) cobalt, and the automaker believes it can soon have them for less than $100 a kWh, helping drop sticker prices even further on the consumer end.

“What we have done is build a multi-brand, multi-segment EV strategy with economies of scale that rival our full-size truck business with much less complexity and even more flexibility,” said CEO Mary Barra, adding that the platform/powertrain combo is capable of delivering everything from compacts to pickups.

This, of course, is partly what happens when you don’t score access to Rivian’s skateboard platform. That said, a single in-house platform that can find its way beneath enough vehicles is a better option. You’re then dependent only on yourself and your customers.

Battery capacity could range from 50 kWh for cheap, small EVs to 200 kWh for big, luxurious SUVs and trucks.

“Motors designed in-house will support front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive and performance all-wheel drive applications,” the automaker stated. “Ultium-powered EVs are designed for Level 2 and DC fast charging. Most will have 400-volt battery packs and up to 200kW fast-charging capability while our truck platform will have 800-volt battery packs and 350 kW fast-charging capability.”

The General has already teased its upcoming GMC Hummer electric pickup — a vehicle that appears to be as big as it is brash. The volume of electrons needed to move its bulk — and deliver the model’s promised performance — will be immense.

In describing the work of “thousands” of GM engineers, designers, and scientists, GM President Mark Reuss stated, “They are on the cusp of delivering a profitable EV business that can satisfy millions of customers.”

Moving forward, GM plans to utilize as many existing facilities and as much existing tooling as possible to streamline the effort, with revenue on the side collected by licensing its battery tech to other automakers.

As for actual product, here’s the gist: Chevrolet, Buick, Cadillac, and GMC will all field EVs, with the first of the new crop arriving this year. GM claims a “new version” of the Chevrolet Bolt will arrive late this year, with the Bolt EUV — a small crossover — tagging along in the  summer of 2021. That crossover will become the first non-Cadillac model to offer the automaker’s recently upgraded Super Cruise advanced driver-assist system.

By 2023, some 22 GM models will play host to the system.

Image: GM

While the new platform is destined for a slew of vehicles, one of those products won’t carry a driver. The Cruise Origin, a self-driving passenger pod built by GM’s autonomous division and revealed earlier this year, will carry both the platform and the new batteries.

Next month, GM pulls the wraps off its Lyriq SUV — the crossover-like vehicle first teased at last year’s Detroit auto show. Expect a reveal at the New York International Auto Show, assuming the rampaging coronavirus doesn’t see the show scrapped. A month after that — May 20th, to be exact — comes the public debut of the GMC Hummer EV, bound for production at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly in the fall of 2021.

Suffice it to say a busy year lies ahead for GM.

[Images: General Motors]

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67 Comments on “GM Lays It Out: Profitable EVs, Everywhere It Can Slot ’em...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    “ The volume of electrons needed to move its bulk — and deliver the model’s promised performance — will be immense.”

    Why? How do we not know this isn’t going to be a unibody CUV (highly likely) that would be no different to move than the Mach-e?

    GM recent history is heavily filled with hype that is not reciprocally met by hype worthy products. Look at how big of a turd the blazer turned out to be. By all accounts you wouldn’t expect GM to do worse than the egg blazers of the late 90s but here we are.

    If GM wants profits it needs more real SUVs and trucks powered by V6 and V8s that aren’t price padded by Immediately outdated technology.

    Placing your entire companies future on EVs is akin to placing the entire companies future on a range of lightweight 2 seaters.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      A bit to unpack here.

      The Blazer is competitive for its intended market and fills a good niche. If you want an ancient gas guzzling off roader there are plenty available.

      I’m not seeing where in the article that GM is “placing its entire company’s future on EVs”. I do think it makes sense for GM to get in early as it has a hole in its lineup that more trucks and revived cars that already failed can’t fill. If they can really make affordable and compelling EVs they should go for it.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        “ If you want an ancient gas guzzling off roader there are plenty available.”

        Where? I would love to buy something you consider “ancient” the Blazer is a lifted car platform that’s far removed from the sporty Blazer that originally wore the name plate.

        “ more trucks and revived cars that already failed can’t fill.

        More trucks is always the answer, your statement may make sense if the Colorado was a failure but that’s not the case. Additionally I see no revived car name plates that are better than the originals being offered for sale in any of the GM brands, so I’m not sure what your specifically referencing there.

        Perhaps not specifically in this article, but Barra made it clear she was putting the majority of R&D money into an all EV future. The market for EVs is slim so making such a deranged statement is a kick in the nads.

        By focusing on an extremely small market segment they are leaving the rest of their product mix with a lack of necessary R&D to stay competitive. We’ve already seen their efforts on their current product mix and most of these such as the Silverado have not been well received. Less money on the bread and butter is the wrong answer.

        • 0 avatar
          dividebytube

          The success of EVs being accepted by the masses remains to be seen. But given the current and future environmental laws of Europe, UK, and China (to name a few), it’s not a bad bet to make. Heck I would like a Tesla if I could buy one in the $20k price range ;)

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            In the US, an EV truck like the Rivian RT1 makes infinite sense, especially with its infinitely variable 1,2,3 or 4WD.

            My guess is that if Tesla had offered a pickup truck instead of more sedans, more people would have coughed up the money to buy one.

            I have high hopes for Rivian. Very practical and appropos.

          • 0 avatar
            Pug

            highdesertcat: “My guess is that if Tesla had offered a pickup truck instead of more sedans, more people would have coughed up the money to buy one.”

            And strangely, the pickup they are planning to make is aimed squarely at the rap video market.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Pug, https://rivian.com/r1t/

            This is what I was talking about instead of that rap-truck Elon is trying to sell the world.

            The first time I visited rivian.com and read up on both the RT1 and RS1, I came away with the feeling that this is what Elon should have done.

            I was impressed enough to pre-order. At the time it cost me $100, and if I lose that for whatever reason, I don’t care because the RT1 concept is something I can believe in for a short-range, running-around truck in the El Paso, TX, area.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            The Edit function is not working and I screwed up.

            The deposit on the Rivian Truck is $1000, not $100 (typo).

            My dyslexic eyes also missed my typos of the models, which should be R1T and R1S, not the way I had it transposed.

            Sorry gang. Careless typing.

            Thanks to one of the readers who emailed me to point out my mistakes.

        • 0 avatar
          DC Bruce

          So long as the EV development is powered by government mandates in western Europe, China and the U.S., this strategy is not at as risky as it would first appear. No one is going to be spending money developing “revolutionary” ICEs. That said, if there is general consumer rejection of EVs (primarily because they are of limited use for trips longer than, say 200 miles because of recharging times) then the entire industry will suffer a loss of volume. As it is, EVs are attractive second cars for people who live in single-family homes that provide access to overnight charging. Unless a person uses public transportation exclusively for inter-city travel, ownership of an ICE-powered vehicle is pretty much mandatory.

          The cost of batteries may be a solvable problem, but bringing full recharge time down to the 10-minutes or so required to fill a 20-gallon gas tank seems a long way off.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @DC Bruce: “Unless a person uses public transportation exclusively for inter-city travel, ownership of an ICE-powered vehicle is pretty much mandatory.”

            That’s not true. A long-range Model 3 with can make it from Boston to New York City with 100 miles range to spare. Boston to DC is 440 miles. So, a Model 3 at a V3 supercharger can go from 6% to 80% in 26 minutes. So stop after 300 miles and probably 4 to 6 hours of driving, you take 25 minutes to rest and recharge. How is it that resting 25 minutes on a long drive after several hours of driving a problem?

            Recharging an EV isn’t like pumping gas into a car. You don’t have to stand next to it while it charges. You can do other things. While it may take only 10 minutes to fuel a gas car, getting food or hitting the bathroom is going to add enough time to equal the charging time on an EV. On a day to day basis, gassing up a car consumes more time than charging. An EV can charge at home or while you work, so you don’t have to take extra time or effort to fuel your vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Eventually people will internalize that, for most of them, the extra time necessary for Level 3 charging on road trips is more than made up by the lack of gas station stops in day-to-day use.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “So, a Model 3 at a V3 supercharger can go from 6% to 80% in 26 minutes.”

            It “can”. Doesn’t mean that will be the reality though.

            businessinsider.com/tesla-supercharger-station-
            videos-reveal-ev-obstacle-2019-12

            I believe this data is from 2003, but you’re talking several million 100+ mile trips occurring during the holidays. Far more than can be absorbed by the airline and rental fleet that are already pushed to max during this time of the year.

            bts.gov/archive/publications/america_on_the_go/us_holiday_travel/figure_03

            If BEVs are going to be the main form of transportation for people then we are going need *a lot* more infrastructure.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “As it is, EVs are attractive second cars for people who live in single-family homes that provide access to overnight charging.”

            Couldn’t agree more. Multi car single family homes are hardly a niched market. When I’m ready to give up my little Chevy Volt the next one will be a full-on BEV. The ICE vehicle can sit in the garage and collect dust all week until Friday comes and it’s time to get out of town in tow!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “The ICE vehicle can sit in the garage and collect dust all week until Friday comes and it’s time to get out of town in tow!”

            This pretty much describes us, although the garage doesn’t really fit a car so we don’t use it. Bolt charges in the driveway and gets used every weekday, Highlander doesn’t move from its spot on the curb most weekdays.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “So long as the EV development is powered by government mandates in western Europe, China and the U.S.,”

            What “mandates” are there in the US outside of California? Especially with *this* government; I’m kind of surprised they haven’t mandated a switch back to leaded gas by now.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @Dal, I think maybe you are correct long term, but on the other side of that coin, I haven’t filled up my car in 2 weeks. It isn’t something that requires any thought until I hit like 50 miles on the range calculator.

            That whole “don’t have to ever think about it” is a big deal. Electrics can get there, but they aren’t there yet and need a lot more infrastructure to get there.

            Yes, I would stop less at the gas station with an EV. No doubt…but is less than 2-3 times a month that big of a deal? Additionally I have to plan my routes and all that. Now Waze shows a traffic jam I go around it. May not be able to do that in the Leaf or even a Tesla on a long trip. No reason we can’t get there, but we aren’t there today.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        They are placing this line of products under the whims of LG. Mercedes seems to be having some trouble with them (see the article above this one!).

        It looks like GM is showing plans similar to VWs – a battery skateboard with the body dropped on top. It’s actually a very good idea. Now let’s get creative with the bodies. Enough SUVs already, for God’s sake!

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Hummer, if you bet the whole company on large SUV with V6 and V8, it only takes a different political climate (anywhere in the world) to wipe out your company.

      As for EV, this platform make sense.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Not really, V6 and V8 trucks and SUVs have likely been 95% of US Domestic profits over the past 20 years.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          The v6 and v8 Truck market is very well served already. You literally have more choices than every other shopper in the market. And the offroad market is served as well. Quit your complaining.

          I could say the only thing VWUSA makes money on is the GTI so everyone should be cranking out all hot hatches all the time, which would be a far more interesting world than yours. We have enough [email protected] trucks. I don’t disparage them, I own one…but the market has plenty of options. Quit complaining and go buy one.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “You literally have more choices than every other shopper in the market.”

            You say the off-road Market is served when there are 2 off-road biased SUVs (Other than Lexus) and 4 off-road trucks – which for most intents and purposes are too long to actually be focused off-roaders.

            Let’s not pretend like the off-road market is well served. You have better choices in the 2 seater coupe market which is historically smaller than the off-road market.

            But the point remains, more truck options equals more profits, more EVs means less profits. I don’t actually think we need more trucks, the market desperately needs more SUVs but adding trucks just brings my point across better.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Wrangler, Land Cruiser (and Lexus LX), 4 Runner, Lexus GX, Gladiator, Mercedes G Class, Not to mention the Raptor and offroad 4 door pickups and the coming Bronco.

            Again, Well Served.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Trucks are not ideal offroaders, there’s a reason military Jeeps and Humvees have very short wheelbases, while thats not discounting those vehicles off-road worthiness they are inherently not ideal off-roading vehicles

            The land cruiser and it’s Lexus version are no longer off-road focused and even Toyota differentiates between its off-road focused land cruiser version and it’s pedestrian cousin that we get.

            That leaves us with the Wrangler, 4Runner, GX, and the Bronco is still an unknown quantity.

            3 vehicles, and 2 of them are platform mates. That is hardly the shining example of choice.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Forgot the G-Wagen and with respect to break over angle midsized trucks are probably fine. Again, given how many people buy them and then run them in the rough stuff, well served.

            What we really need is an Acura version of the Type R, and a Mustang with the Ford GT motor.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ What we really need is an Acura version of the Type R….”

            We have no shortage of tiny front wheel drive turbo boy racer mobiles. What we do have is a serious shortage of off-road vehicles which I have provided evidence to suggest is an under served market. Also good luck with your aftermarket on the Gwagon to get it lifted up enough for respectable sized tires and ground clearance.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            The cash on the hood of the Jeep models, even the Gladiator again suggests it is adequately served. How much cash is on the hood of a type R Golf or Civic Type R?

            As most Jeeps are used to drive mommy to the mall you also have a plethora of used rigs to buy that are clean.

            Well served

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            How much cash is on the hood of the 4Runner? How well are those Type R civics selling? I suspect Honda will soon drop the Type R because it isn’t selling, dealers pretending it’s actually worth $40k doesn’t help.

            Ford certainly put a good amount of cash on those Fiestas and Focuses to get them off dealer lots.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            They did. It is a result of equipping the volume models with the devil’s own transmission. GTI’s, not so much. Type R’s continue to sell at close to or over MSRP. SI’s continue to sell well without ton’s of cash (This would be a step down from the class I was talking about but still, your point is taken). STI doesn’t seem to need a ton of incentives.

            Honda will likely drop the R. We never get the good stuff like that for very long so you have to sort of grab it while you can. I’d grab the Golf R at that range anyway…looks better, hence my desire for an Acura version without the study hall styling. Still, when they do drop it you are down to one, hence we need more. Unlike “offroad” vehicles that most people “offroad” by jumping the curb at the mall. That market is well served.

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    ….. well at least their build quality will not be any worse than Tesla!

  • avatar
    Zoomers_StandingOnGenius_Shoulders

    At this point, with all SUV/CUV seemingly based off cars, automakers might as well start using car nameplates for them. We are at at a place where there’s as many diff models of lifted car based utes as there once were regular sedans/cars. Might as well, youre getting rid of all your traditional cars anyway.

  • avatar
    redgolf

    Just give me a reasonable lease payment and I’ll be there!I always wanted av EV but not until they improved and the cost comes down, I think GM is headed in the right direction, just need an improved infrastructure to really make it take off!

  • avatar
    conundrum

    LG Chem batteries? That’s the company that cannot even make enough for existing companies they claim to be able to supply Jaguar, Mercedes, BMW and VW for a start.

    I had a Lucky Goldstar TV for a while. It quit as well.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      LG is fine for battery, Chevy Bolt / Volt have no battery problem, as do many others. Makes you wonder if it is the Europeans that have problem switching to EV instead of the battery that has been fine since Volt came out.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed. Everybody seems to be drawing from the same LG Chem well, except Tesla, of course.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    Realistically, GM should just stick to making trucks. The days when they were capable of producing a car that can be competitive outside the US are long gone.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      GM trucks underwhelm these days. That’s why GM trucks have fallen to third place in the real-world market.

      An embarrassing fete accompli not lost on RAM, the former No. 3 spot holder that was able to wrest away the number two position from a much, much larger rival GM.

      • 0 avatar

        If and when PSA and FCA merger is successful, Chrysler will be bigger than GM. This possibility was created when Barra sold Opel to PSA giving them the strength to take over FCA. This is the real reason GM is suing FCA.

  • avatar
    Lokki

    At a glance it looks like GM is going to make one platform and dress it for the occasion. Add an extra motor or two if you want 4WD; bolt them just on the front for FWD or just on the back end for sporty RWD. Rubber mats on top of the battery for the interior floor of the Hummer, carpet pad and some wall-to-wall for the Cadillacs. Use software disable codes on the cheap models so only the people willing to pay get power mirrors but utilize a single chip for all the electronics on every model.

    They’re gonna just mint money with this approach; how could it fail?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ” with this approach; how could it fail?”

      GM has to get this concept/idea past the Feds and while it may seem the ideal location to have the battery pack also make up the floor, it offers little protection against T-Bone collisions and off-set front-end crashes, the way that a shielded/protected battery pack in current BEVs does.

      This is a whole new arena, and I’m sure that someone will find a way to make it safe and marketable.

      My money is on Toyota. We haven’t heard from them lately.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Have to agree with you on Toyota. There is a company that tears down products and gives an in-depth analysis of the engineering of what they find. Tesla received top marks in the EV portion of the Model 3 – battery, electronics, motors, etc. But they did not fare all that well with the basic “body-in-white” construction of a modern unibody vehicle. The car was determined to be unnecessarily heavy, with excessive amounts of body seam sealer and adhesives. Toyota already has the body down better than most. With all the experience they have with hybrids I would think the lift to Tesla level electrics will be much easier for them to accomplish than Tesla reaching Toyota-level body construction…

        • 0 avatar

          Toyota gets it GM does not. Toyota is taking a more measured approach to this electric car hysteria. They are developing EV’s, but not at the expense of their traditional gasoline-powered cars. Toyota, unlike GM, is not putting all their eggs in one basket.

          This approach bears fruit and explains why Toyota sell 4 million more vehicles a year than GM. Most don’t realize how small GM has become in just a decade.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            GM having to put all their eggs in one basket is pretty much driven by the traditional buyers realizing that GM is still fraught with the same ills that caused the bankrupture in 2009.

            Those buyers are putting their money elsewhere, and no company can last long when that happens.

            GM has been forced to “downsize” by customers turning away. People looking for value are turning to other car makers for ICE and/or EVs.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that’s a charitable way to make excuses for Toyota. They’re not “taking a more measured approach,” they’ve been wasting their time and resources on hydrogen instead.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            If current trends at Toyota are any inclination @Akear, look for their EV to have someone elses drivetrain…they don’t engineer anything that is remotely cutting edge on their own. Ooooohhhh…looookie…Toyota’s get Android Auto and Car play now…stuff other automakers have been putting in everything for at least half a decade.

            Look, if you value reliability above all else and in fact don’t really value anything else, get a Toyota. If you value any other traits at all, you’ll probably be happier elsewhere. They are reliable cars. Note I said reliable, not good.

            The new Prius EV…with BMW I3 power…in a Mazda body…available at your Toyota dealer today.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ” if you value reliability above all else and in fact don’t really value anything else, get a Toyota. ”

            That’s exactly it!

            That’s how Toyota got to be where they are today, after Ford restarted Toyota when Gen MacArthur governed Japan at the end of WWII.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            But my point @HDC is that not everyone has reliability at the top of their list and weights it so heavily as some. How a car drives is way above that in my book. Handling probably being the top thing I care about. I would rather hit the shop every now and then than drive a Maytag every day.

            I typically look at handling, power, fun to drive, heck even the ease of use of the infotainment suite before absolute reliability…most cars today are pretty good so at the end of the day my reliability concerns equate to “Is it reliable enough?”

            Clearly this isn’t everyone, but given the sales of cars like the GTI, Challenger, Mustang, BMW M cars, Porsches, and other cars that excel in areas outside of Consumer Reports dots, it is quite a few people.

            My mother has a Rav. It is great for her but she could care less about her cars outside of them getting her to the flea market. Yes, my vehicle choices mean that every now and then I have to drop the car off at the shop (though strangely, more often than not it is my wife’s “safe purchase appliance grade” Hyundai that gets this), but nobody ever thinks on their Death bed that they wish they had driven a Camry and their are no Alfas in Heaven.

            I just don’t get the “why would people buy X brand that is less reliable than Toyota” talk. People don’t buy them because by in large, they value traits that make Toyotas miserable to drive in their mind. I’d rather have the car bite in a turn and be able to play nice with my phone to facilitate the streaming of 90’s hits.

            I mean Vanilla Ice’s “To The Extreme” sold way more copies in 1991 Than Nirvana’s “Nevermind”, but which album do you think people actually care about?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “not everyone has reliability at the top of their list and weights it so heavily as some. ”

            Sure. That goes without saying.

            And that’s why it is a sad testament to find out that so many Americans think of cars as appliances, rather than the open road adventure machines you and I consider cars.

            My personal preferences are huge V8s, expressive styling and competent handling, as in “fun to drive.”

            Not practical. Not even daily drivers. So what am I forced to choose? SUVs and Pickup Trucks.

            Concourse D’Elegance, Jay Leno’s Collection and the Petersen Automotive Museum strive to preserve some of those rolling works of art of the past. Maybe not the most reliable, or the most practical, but certainly a blast to drive.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Darn Jay Leno’s Garage. I really want a Lancia after watching him do several on his YouTube channel. Now what was I saying about “Reliable Enough”?

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    ‘Peek’. GM hasn’t been peak-anything for a while, but for the Corvette.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I am going to bet that the Chinese come up with the lower cost and more viable EV. The Chinese have been aggressively working on EVs. As for suvs with V-6’s and V-8’s eventually the Government will put so many restrictions on efficiency that it will be virtually impossible for the manufacturers to make an affordable ICE truck or suv with a V-6 or V-8. Eventually the US will adopt standards like the EU standards. There is only so much efficiency and lower emissions that the manufacturers can get from an ICE power train and stiffer regulations will make it harder to obtain at a price that makes ICE vehicles affordable. As for the present political climate that is more relaxed on emission and efficiency standards things can change in the future especially as another generation takes over. Things always change.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I agree with you on the Chinese primarily because China is forced to adopt EVs due to their pollution and adapt current ICE vehicles to morph into BEVs.

      But when it comes to the electrical/electronics functionality, I’m a huge fan of the one-motor-in-each-wheel school of thought because coupled with the right electronics management, power can be easily and instantly applied to 4, 3, 2 or 1-wheel motor depending on the power and torque needs while in operation.

  • avatar

    has anyone looked into the EMFs radiating from these juiced machines?

  • avatar

    GM is living in a fool’s paradise if they think they will ever equal Tesla in EV sales. People purchase Tesla for the exotic name and not merely for its electric technology. Tesla has an exciting image, while GM represents mainstream mediocrity.

    No statistical analyst can back up GM’s claim that they can go from selling 15,000 Bolts a year to 3 million EVs by 2030. They would have sold more Cruzes in one year than 5 years of electric Hummer sales.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      GM once had the means to outweigh Tesla, but GM’s track record in quality, value and ROI has wiped out that advantage.

      Now, that said, I see a rare opportunity here for GM and Tesla to reach an agreement where GM builds Tesla BEVs to satisfy demand for Tesla products in return for the use of Tesla BEV architecture, while GM retains its own design.

      Of course that will give the UAW another crowbar with which to damage the US auto industry.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    An agreement between Tesla and GM would make the most sense especially if GM built thee Tesla cars but I am not sure either would come to an agreement. GM has the capacity to build EVs for themselves and Tesla but then the question is can both put their egos aside and reach an agreement.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      You’re right. That would be the biggest stumbling block, their individual and corporate egos.

      But Subaru and Toyota were able to work out a deal. And BMW and Mazda. And in the past there was Mitsu and Chrysler, Toyota and GM. Probably more that I care not to remember.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      What are they just going to give NUMMI back to GM? Tesla isn’t letting UAW labor anywhere near their cars.

  • avatar

    Toyota sees no reason to chase the electric vehicle market, which constitutes just over 1% of the market. Remember, Tesla has 90% of that 1% of the electric vehicle market, which means Bolt sales are almost invisible. Toyota will just sit back and watch GM fall further behind in market share. The Prius alone will outsell all GM EV’s combined. Last year Toyota sold 70,000 Prius’s, which gives the Prius a sales advantage over the Bolt by nearly a 4 to 1 margin.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The Prius isn’t an EV. Thats’s no different than saying the Sierra outsells the Prius and the Tundra combined. It does, but it is a stupid statistic.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “Toyota sees no reason to chase the electric vehicle market”

      Maybe not in the US at this time, but China is forcing Toyota’s hand IF Toyota wants a piece of the EV action in China now, and in the future.

      I believe EVs should be available to anyone who wants to buy one in the US, just not with US taxpayer subsidies. So I say, “Import them from China and elsewhere”, without the US taxpayer subsidies.

      But I hope to own a Rivian R1T when they become available to the public, if it is within my financial grasp. Maybe with the smallest battery.

      We shall see what we shall see.

  • avatar

    GM’s stock today is lower than anytime during the strike. Obviously, investors are not impressed with GM’s EV initiative. GM’s stock almost went below 30 today.

    Why can’t GM just build decent vehicles that people want to buy. If Kia can build a competitive sedan why can’t GM? I fear GM will fall even further behind in their mainstream cars and trucks as the pursue electric vehicles few will buy.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Or investors juuuuust might be a little bit worried about companies dependent on global supply chains, especially those with a lot of Chinese exposure. Can you think of maybe just one tiny little reason in the news lately that might be. Surely you aren’t that daft.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesertcat–Maybe GM and Tesla will prove me wrong and do a joint venture in EVs. Both need to put aside their huge egos and look at the benefits that the a joint venture would do for both. If GM is spending the money to redo their Hamtramck plant to make EVs it would make sense to utilize any of the additional capacity of that plant.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Jeff S, currently EVs are a minuscule fraction of annual vehicle sales. But that should change as time progresses and battery tech improves.

      The state of the US economy is also a huge driving factor for the demand for EVs. The better and more prosperous the US economy, the more disposable income, and more retirees willing to spend some of that accumulated deferred spending on a toy. The difference between men and boys……

      Hey, just the fact that moi, moi!, is looking to buy a Rivian R1T, speaks volumes.

      So, somewhere, somehow, automakers have to collude amongst themselves to supply that future rising demand for EVs, as a third, fourth or fifth vehicle in a two-driver household.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesertcat–the Hamtramck plant will have millions spent on it to adapt it to make EVs and since it is being adapted to make EVs it would make sense to manufacturer other EVs. Agree that the annual sales for EVs in the next few years will be minuscule and I will be one of the late adopters of EVs. I don’t plan on buying any vehicle in the next 10 years unless some unforeseen incident happens like one of my vehicles gets totalled and then I might choose to buy a used late model vehicle if it is a lot less money. I believe that even if Trump gets re-elected that eventually the Democrats will win the Presidency and that the legislative branch will eventually change which will cause more regulations on ICE vehicles. Eventually we might all be driving EVs and that is why I am not that anxious to invest a lot of money in a new vehicle besides putting 5k or less on a vehicle per year. I am not going to lose any sleep over this but I just don’t want to invest a lot of money on an ICE vehicle if it is regulated out of existence. I would just prefer to wait and see what happens.

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