By on April 7, 2020

2014 Nissan cube

There’s no shortage of people choosing to signal their offbeat, nonconformist nature via their daily driver. As build configurations shrink and niche products dry up, this is becoming increasingly hard; still, it’s a thing, and if it means reaching into the past for a defunct nameplate, many are up for the challenge.

A buddy of mine did it with a certain low-volume Isuzu. Car Twitter is littered with childless Millennials who advocate the purchase of impractical, less-loved models as their preferred transportation choice. More power to them; just don’t react with confused horror when people with a mortgage and growing brood opt for a GMC Acadia or Toyota Highlander as their main driveway denizen.

With oddball vehicles now more numerous in our past then our present, which unlikely model do you harbor a secret desire for?

To be clear, we’re not talking about some sort of foreign, right-hand-drive exotic that just cleared the 25-year import period. We’re talking about a model that was sold here, bought here, and marketed here. It’s possibly, nay, likely, that this certain model also disappeared after a short run due to lack of consumer interest.

At the time of purchase, this automobile was just as avant-garde as it is today, telegraphing to the world that the person behind the wheel was an onion, a vessel of undiscovered truths and limitless mystery. You know, like a Nissan Cube driver.

While an upwelling of irony in the middle part of this decade brought new luster to the once derived Pontiac Aztek, I’m not someone who wants to sit in a plastic-fantastic GM cabin with a so-ugly-it’s-cool body. I’ve driven enough GM in my time. As for things like the Cube, I consider that particular model a rolling horror — and a potential tip-off that the driver’s Google search history might be seriously NSFW.

Never mind practicality or reliability. Looks alone deep-sixes that choice.

As for other oddities (like the Suzuki X-90, say, or maybe a Saturn Sky), livability has to factor into the buy. The vehicle still has to function as a more-or-less normal vehicle, serving most of my needs in a glorious, virus-free future.

Which brings me to a vehicle spurned by the U.S. buying public, but one that I’ve always liked the look of. Never driven one, to be clear, but it possesses enough appeal to float it to the forefront of my consciousness.

The Acura ZDX. Built in very small numbers from model years 2010 to 2013, the ZDX was a near-exact realization of the brand’s early sketches — and the heavy beast’s limited cargo volume reflected that. Just 7,191 were sold in the U.S.

While Acura’s long-gone shield grille always turned me off, the feature works better on the ZDX. The model doesn’t want for power, either, what with its 300-horse 3.7-liter V6, and all-wheel drive boosts its all-weather capability immensely. As I don’t care about the comfort of rear-seat passengers, nor do I carry much gear anywhere, the sloping roofline concerns me little. Let it do its thing as a styling flourish.

A crossover coupe before they were “cool,” the ZDX fits the bill for being rare, striking, and very, very dead. What’s your pick?

[Images: Nissan, Acura]

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73 Comments on “QOTD: A Car Only YOU Could Love?...”


  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    I have to say it…I liked the Cube. I liked the look, inside and out. It didn’t look like a typical Nissan on the inside, it was roomy, it was different (on these shores.) I didn’t like the fact that an elderly slug crawling on a salt flat under the desert sun could beat it from 0-60 and the CVT sapped whatever enjoyment could be had…but that’s Nissan for you.

    I’ve liked the Nissan oddballs over the years. I really liked the Juke and going back a couple of decades, the NX2000 was on my short list to buy. I can’t defend the Murano CC, however…that is in the solid BURN category!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I always liked the Subaru BRAT and never really understood why it was such a failure. I’m still hopeful we’ll see the Hyundai Santa Cruz someday

    • 0 avatar
      Kenn

      Oh yeah, we’ll see the Hyundai Santa Cruz – but it will be nothing like the concept’s design that earned so much praise.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I liked it as well, but having said that, I absolutely understand why it was a failure. Nobody wants to sit back there and as a truck on its own merits it never fit the American mold.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Before reading through the stipulations, my first choice was going to be a Beretta Z26 – but that was somewhat popular and desirable in its time.

    So, after reading, my choice is the Suzuki Kizashi. I was seriously considering buying one new in 2012. In GTS trim it was very attractive and was supposed to eventually be available with a manual transmission. And while I am definitely not a manual-or-nothing guy, I would have preferred mine to come with a stick and select-able AWD. The SLS trim was also nice and up level from the GTS, but for whatever reason I was always looking at the GTS.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      Back when i was a tech, i had a customer who owned a Suzuki Kizashi as you described above (except FWD). It was his sleeper car; large turbo and all the upgraded gadgets to go along with it. He claimed he would beat corvettes and camaros in street races. I never got to drive it outside of the service dept so I was never able to verify its speed, but it was a neat little car. I’d drive one.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenn

        Everyone seems to have forgotten the Kizashi’s Achilles heel: a terrible, first-generation CVT. That would be a source of daily dissatisfaction (and high long-term repair/replacement costs).

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      The Kizashi looked entirely decent in person, and on a spec sheet.

      The main problems seemed to be: finding a dealership and finding parts. Also, Suzuki left North America in 2013. At the time of their exit, they sold fewer cars than Mitsubishi!

      An interesting car with no future. Too bad.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      The Kizashi was nice. It’s a shame somebody didn’t work out a deal to badge engineer it.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    I’m gonna go all vocabulary on you for a moment here:

    “While an upwelling of irony in the middle part of this decade brought new luster to the once derived Pontiac Aztek”

    I think you’re thinking of:

    derided – verb (used with object), de·rid·ed, de·rid·ing. to laugh at in scorn or contempt; scoff or jeer at; mock.

    derived – verb (used with object), de·rived, de·riv·ing.
    to receive or obtain from a source or origin (usually followed by from).
    to trace from a source or origin: English words derived from German.
    to reach or obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer.
    Chemistry. to produce or obtain (a substance) from another.
    Grammar. to create (a new linguistic form) by adding affixes to or changing the shape of a root or base: The word “runner” is derived from “run.”

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      Thank you!

      Sometimes we can all get a bit too nit-picky but incorrect word use really sets my teeth on edge at times.
      I had a co-worker who thought his command of the English language (his native tongue) was a lot better that it really was. He was once interviewing prospective job candidate who was rejected for the job. When I asked him why; he said the candidate wanted an exuberant amount of money. :)
      (There’s probably a grammatical error in this post somewhere)

  • avatar
    Boff

    I always had a soft spot for the Lada Niva, now I can only get my fix by watching Russian dash cam crash videos

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    A long time ago, you could tell pretty much what a person was like by the vehicle they drove. To some extent you can still do so today, but only with a very broad brush.

    Today’s cars in any given “class” have become too generic. There are some few outliers but they tend to be rare simply because they’re the most extreme of the bunch. Go back a little over 60 years and every make had their own distinctive look and every model had its own take on that look. It was easy to tell a Ford Falcon from a Thunderbird from a Galaxie, etc. Look in the last decade and you couldn’t tell a Fiesta from a Focus from a Fusion, other than by their size. At any distance, that first glance could have you mistake even the largest one for a smaller one. Look at Ford’s SUV/CUV lineup and the only real unique model is the Flex…or rather, was the Flex. You still knew it was a Ford but it simply didn’t look like the other models in its overall class.

    My point is that some people still want their car to express their personality beyond “Wage Slave”, “Tough Guy” or “Street Racer,” to oversimplify. Oh, let’s not forget “Soccer Mom” as well. This is why they tend to buy those more extreme-looking models such as the Cube, shown in the teaser above.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      My own choice has been stated many times, and yes, it’s a 61-year-old model. Almost nothing available today really expresses my tastes. I still prefer above all others, the ’59 El Camino.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    If I had space and the money to be so impractical, I’d be buying 1970’s malaise era vehicles that I remember as a teenager. I had an AMC Pacer that I drove in driver’s ed in the late 1970’s and I really liked the car. I’d own one just to own one. Then I’d build a fleet of 12 mpg American barges and enjoy floating over hideous modern Toyoduhs and Honduhs.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Isuzu Vehicross.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Good choice, another interesting vehicle that people didn’t quite get

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I today’s CUV market the Vehicross would likely be a big seller.

    • 0 avatar
      SilverCoupe

      Isuzu Vehicross was my answer too.

    • 0 avatar
      Carfan94

      Have any of yall driven Vehicross? My mom had a 2001 for a few years. She loved it. It was Dark red with gray and black interior.

      It was the harshest riding vehicle I’ve ever had the misfortune of riding in. It managed to be both incredibly stiff and bouncy at the same time. It would loudly crash, and jar over bumps and bounce afterwards like a pogo stick. And to top it off the rear swinging door would constantly squeak over rough roads. Interior door trim around the window switches cracked and broke off. leaving them in a hole. Window regulators failed as well. But the styling was unique and ahead of its time. especially the 18-inch wheels and LED spoiler. And it seemed to have a decent V6.

      Shame we didn’t get the JDM backup camera it desperately needed it!

  • avatar
    lstanley

    I love me the Hummer H3T and I would drive one unironically. But frankly they remain too expensive.

    An entry-level Maserati holds sway over me a few times a year, at least until I do my research.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Lotus Elise.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    My DD is a 2011 Saab 9-5 only made for 2 years , still looks good 9 years later, still really easy to find in a parking lot. Before that I had a VW TDI wagon and a Infinity J30 also. I like cars that do not blend in, a regal wagon would fit that bill and is on the list of what car I would buy if my Saab got totaled tomorrow.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    1987 Nissan Stanza Wagon. But it is an opposite case. 2 spark plugs per cylinder, 36mpg hwy, rear sliding doors and cargo configuration that fits 2 loveseats inside the cabin. Only I could love it.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Known in Canada as the Multi. I nearly got one but went with the Honda Civic RealtimeAWD Wagon instead.

      Loved the Honda but eventually replaced it, at very low miles because it was too small.

      So in retrospect the Multi or its replacement the Axxess might have been a better choice.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        My uncle had that Honda. I drove it. I know what it is. Yea, Stanza Wag was way roomier. And it had MT! The rear seat was glorious for a car of that era.

  • avatar
    make_light

    Maybe this isn’t ONLY me, but I think the previous-gen Buick Regal was vastly underrated and I loved it. Nice styling, decently powerful standard engine, quiet, and a sturdy-feeling interior. While the materials weren’t opulent, it felt screwed together with a Germanic-ness lacking in the new Regal (and even some new German cars, for that matter).

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      It might be only you – just kidding – and I’m a Buick fan. I just couldn’t get past slightly too blobby styling of the previous-gen Regal or Lacrosse. When I was car shopping, I purposely shopped post ’17 for the Lacrosse or post ’18 for the Regal. I liked the newer stylings much better. But that’s just me. I also secretly lusted after a Buick Lucerne (in CXS or Super trim) for years.

    • 0 avatar
      PeterKK

      We had one for a bit. I agree, it was a great car.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      The GS version was the one to buy. It had the 2.0 turbo with the handling and wheel package plus you could get a manual but only with fwd. Apparently it was destined to be a Saturn before the brand was axed.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’m honestly a fan of every generation of the Regal GS.

  • avatar
    paxman356

    I am the proud owner of a 2013 Suzuki Kizashi. The only fault is it’s CVT, which is capable, but a CVT nonetheless. It has good acceleration, and is comfy with some nice features. I got it cheap because nobody knows what it is, and Suzuki left the US.

  • avatar
    raph

    Apparently a stock appearing FD RX7 with gasp… stock rotary and not an ever so trite LS swap.

    On a more serious note I can’t really think of a vehicle only I could love?

  • avatar
    ajla

    Jaguar X-Type.

  • avatar
    Don Mynack

    There used to be an awesome commenter on Jalopnik who loved Smart Cars. I hate those cars, but love that someone loves them.

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      Interesting because I hate the word awesome. Hum..

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I’ve driven enough Smarts from when Car2Go was still a thing, and they’re weird and charming if you like small cars. They’re light and eager, super manouverable, and how many other rear-engined econocars have we gotten in the past 50 years? They don’t make any sense unless you’re parallel parking all the time, but they’re at least memorable.

  • avatar
    PeterKK

    I’ve always wanted a Mighty Max. Just because of the name.

    I do love your pick of the ZDX, though. That thing looks rad.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I have an infatuation with the Italian/FCA cars. I loved the 500 Abarth, especially in cabrio form. But it just wouldn’t work for me, not as well as my Golf does.

    Quirky and unusual, I drove a leftover 2014 500 GQ series cabrio years ago. It was the Abarth without all the scorpions (which as a Scorpio, I was OK with) and “boy racer” stuff and a nice leather interior compared to the regular cars. Couldn’t swing it at the time and now I don’t have enough space. But I still love those little cars.

    See also Alfa Guilia. I drove a “base” RWD car when they first appeared. It drove wonderfully, even with an auto and putting it in “sport” or “corse” changed made the car just crazy. I was ready to take one home, but the lease was completely ridiculous ( 5,000 down for 36 months/400mo) and so I went with my Golf. Definitely the most practical choice. But oh, I love that Alfa and still search for used ones. All that’s on hold for now, of course.

    The biggest problem is the reliability, lack of data and that the Alfa dealer network is non-existent even before all the COVID related downfall. The one Alfa-only dealer is 40 minutes from me, even without traffic.

    Both cars will be orphans before long I fear and therefore worthless. Which will be the time to pick them up for a little bit.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I still lust after an M Coupe – aka the Clown Shoe BMW. These have kind of a cult following so not sure it counts as something that doesn’t get much love.

    My wife LOVED her Volvo C30 which ranks high on the overlooked, unwanted & never sold well vehicle list.

    As you can tell I’ve got a thing for hatchbacks which started with my first car: a Civic S1500. My last car was a 350Z and my current car is a C7. I just find your basic 3 door configuration solves most vehicle usage needs provided you don’t have kids.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The C30 is very high on any list of cars that were shafted by journalists’ always wanting everything to drive like a track car. All the reviews were like “fine but the handling isn’t sharp enough.” Not everything has to be a Focus RS, but you wouldn’t know that from reading the mags.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Good point. The handling was soft, but its a Volvo which is a “near luxury” (whatever that means) product. My wife loved the plush ride. The C30 was designed to compete with the Mini so maybe that’s why journalists gave it the thumbs down in the handling comparison.

        Our only complaint with it was the terrible reliability, so in that way they did capture the Mini experience. My wife wanted a Mini but was turned off by the silly interior. In comparison the Volvo’s interior was wonderful: sleek, sophisticated & minimalist – very Swedish indeed. And the seats where just as amazing as everyone claims.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Amphicar

  • avatar
    R Henry

    My offbeat dream garage would include all the cars that can be purchased new today in USA with a manual transmission. Not many cars in that garage. I can’t think anything that would be more against-the-grain of contemporary automotive design.

  • avatar
    haroldhill

    Saab 96. Nice machine. Drove one through eastern Canada in the early 70’s and felt special because I didn’t see any others on the road. Turns out they weren’t being marketed in Canada back then.

    But my all-time favorite was a 92 Dodge Spirit 4-cylinder. Unobtrusive, reliable, and comfortable. Just enough road feel to be pleasant. The best generation of all the K cars.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      haroldhill – Agreed. I was close to pulling the trigger on a new one in ’71. Green with tan interior, V4 engine, 4 on the tree transmission. Couldn’t get my price – the dealer stood on the too-high sticker. Fun to drive, weird looking, well screwed together.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    Toyota/Scion iQ, though I do wish they had the manual transmission version available here.

    I don’t really need a car that short, but the packaging of that car was very smart and I’ve always had a soft spot for the car.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Hybrids, in general.

    Magazine reviewers always review them badly in one of two ways: either (1) “it’ll take too long to make up the purchase price difference in gas savings” or (2) “the engine drones and the brakes feel funny.” This is especially true for C&D which thinks that cruising at a steady 75 mph is the only situation where fuel economy should be evaluated. Meanwhile, they totally overlook advantages of hybrids like ultra-smooth powertrains and being able to sit in your car with climate control on and the engine mostly off.

    I currently own a Highlander Hybrid. If I didn’t need the third row and cargo space, I’d probably own a hybrid Lexus sedan (either LS600hL or GS450h). I wouldn’t buy any of those cars because of a fuel price calculation, but because I like them better than the conventional versions. For lux-oriented cars like that, a V6 or V8 hybrid powertrain is just dreamy. And I got used to the different brake feel after a couple days of having a rental Prius, far before I ever actually bought a hybrid.

    • 0 avatar
      Carfan94

      Thank you! I agree with everything you said especially about C&D. As The owner of a 2007 RX 350 with 196k miles. I want my next car to be either an RX 450h or ES 300h. Although I struggle with the idea of giving up a V6. A hybrid does make 4cyl more palatable. I may even consider a 2019 RAV4 Hybrid as I love the styling of those.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Jack Baruth nailed this in November 26th 2015 in one of the very best columns ever posted on this site: ‘You Gotta Be Rich to Own a Cheap Car’.

    1) Cars last much longer now. The 3 year loan was designed in a day and age when a car that was more than 3 years old was well on its way to being a ‘beater’.
    2) You can get a far better interest rate on a new car than on a used car. So the final purchase cost on a used car may not be that much lower.
    3) I am in Canada, so ‘cheap’ ‘good’ used cars are few and far between. We have a much smaller market, a smaller supply of used cars, and we use salt in much of the country. Also Canadians buy more cheap cars, small cars and hatchbacks than Americans. The so called ‘Quebec specials’.
    4) Why would I use any cash reserves to buy a depreciating asset? I can take that cash put it into my retirement fund (RSP) and then get a considerable tax reduction based on my contribution. A far better use of available cash than using it towards an auto purchase.
    5) If I purchase a 5 year old used car, the chances are that I will only have to replace it 5 years sooner than if I purchased a new car. And I will have to spend more on its maintenance than if I bought a new car. And I am dependent upon how the previous owner maintained it.
    6) When taking out long term loans inflation is your friend. Your payments actually are worth about 2.5% less in ‘real money’ each year of your loan.
    7) If you buy your vehicle and keep it for longer than your loan, then being ‘upside down’ is not that big a problem.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    @TimHealey: Please fix this fershlingin site. I am on volunteer operated sites that work better than this. The last ‘improvement’ has made this site frustratingly difficult to log into, to post comments on, or to read comments.

    As for cars that I like, no surprise that I would pick 1) Lincoln Mark IV, 2) 1959 Cadillac, 3) VW Type III squareback, and 4) the original Cordoba. Runner up would be either an original AMX or a 225 slant six, pre pollution control 4 door, Dodge Dart.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I have a soft spot for the Fiat 500 particularly the Sport and Abarth versions. I sat in one and it fit my 6’2″ self fairly well. They should have offered a tad larger one like the old Cinquecento. Maybe when the inexpensive orphaned ones are out there in a few years I’ll pick one up as a retirement project.

    I’ve come to appreciate the Pontiac Aztek. You can understand why it was in Breaking Bad as a kind of inside joke. Literally “Ha!, the poor chemistry teacher drives a freakin Aztek.” Its aged well particularly compared some of todays CUV’s.

    The Nissan Pulsar NX as well. Kind of derided as a “chick car” but the SE version with the 16V motor and standard T-Tops looks fun and as good as a performer as the well regarded and sought out Toyota FX-16 or the early 90’s Corolla 86 FWD.

  • avatar
    amwhalbi

    Absolutely loved my 1970 Mercury Capri (German made). It was an excellent car for the first 70,000 miles, then repair costs got out of hand and I regretfully dumped it. But those first 70,000 miles were awesome – whether doing the daily driver bit or driving on vacation.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Wasn’t there a flying Pinto someone built? I think it killed him, but it worked as I remember. I’d daily it

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Yes, it was called a “Mizar”. You’d probably survive as long as you didn’t try to fly it.

    • 0 avatar
      pwrwrench

      Art, Yes. There was a flying Pinto. The designers/engineers used the wings and rear engine from a Cessna 337 which had an unusual twin engine arrangement with one engine at the front of the fuselage, as on most small planes and one at the back. With a twin boom, twin tail setup.
      The idea was that the wings and airplane engine could be attached and removed in less than half an hour. There were problems where the wing struts attached to the bottom of the Pinto. The first time the join failed an experienced test pilot was flying. Realizing that a turn would be disastrous the pilot continued straight and landed in a farm field a few miles from the airport. Supposedly the flying Pinto was driven the few miles back to the airport.
      Unfortunately the next time this happened the inventor/designer was the driver/pilot and he tried to return to the airport. Without the support of the strut the wing folded up and the Pinto crashed, not far from where it landed in the earlier incident. It did make many successful flights and drove on the road in between.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    If I have to pick a real car that was built (not a one off flying malaisemobile that killed it’s inventor one flight in) I’d say the BMW 318ti. I mean c’mon…it was the lightest E36 you could get, was a hatch, and as I recall, had the simpler E30 rear suspension. I believe it sold well elsewhere, but it was pretty slim in the US which makes me sad because I’d love a clean one to swap some M power into.

    Also I have a soft spot for the NX2000 from Nissan. B13 SE-R goodness, but lighter and with better brakes.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Let me add the somewhat maligned PT Cruiser to the mix. A decently optioned pre-2005 before the cheapening GT version with the 2.4 Turbo is a fun ride.

  • avatar
    B-BodyBuick84

    Probably the vehicle I grew up in , a 1992 Buick Century wagon. Don’t get me wrong, they were popular vehicle’s but not with the 2.5 iron duke and 3 speed slushbox powering it. It is still the worst combination I’ve ever had the misfortune of experiencing, but I begrudgingly loved it for sentimentality sake. It is also the only 89-93 model year wagon I’ve ever come across or heard of, with the Iron Duke. Most got the 3.3 V6 with the 4 speed overdrive, which I assume was a far better combination for that style of vehicle.

  • avatar
    Oketnom

    Merkur anyone?

  • avatar
    Oketnom

    Merkur anyone?

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    88-91 civic si, same era CRX. same era suzuki samurai. geo metro convertible, toyota paseo convertible, geo tracker, 2 door RAV4… small, japanese and cute.

  • avatar
    Sigfried

    I’ve wanted a VW Karmann Ghia ever since high school. My brother had a 58 rustbucket with two inch open rust slots behind the headlights. He offered to sell it to me for $125 but Dad nixed the deal, telling me it was a death trap. He didn’t like the idea that the gas tank sat on top of your lap. I’ve wanted one ever since. I think the appearance of a VW Bug that somebody stomped on looks cool.

    More recently I saw an Isuzu VehiCROSS and thought, “Now THAT looks cool.” Though nowadays the farthest from the beaten track that I’m likely to get is a Kia Sedona instead of the ubiquitous Grand Caravan.

  • avatar
    Sigfried

    Back in the 80’s I got to own several unique vehicles, mostly purchased on their last legs and junked within a year or so.

    72 Gremlin 252 3-speed manual
    73 Capri with manual sunroof & v6
    74 Opel 2-door sedan (Kadett style, not Manta)
    66 Galaxie 4-door hardtop
    81 Ford EXP (2-seat Escort)
    82 AMC Concord
    Two different 76 Plymouth Fury 2-doors, one with 360 auto and console in between the bucket seats (looked nice but ran horrible) and one strippo version with slant six and three in the tree, bench seat and no a/c (looked horrible but ran nice).

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