By on March 3, 2020

Given the avalanche of new domestic pickups smothering the American marketplace over the past couple of years, you’d be forgiven for forgetting about the Toyota Tundra, last revamped during the latter part of the Bush administration.

And yet, after Ford comes out with a new F-150 later this year and Nissan gets its midsize offering in order, there’ll be a new full-sizer from Toyota.

A U.S. trademark filing dated February 18th asks for the i-Force Max name, no doubt referring to the upcoming Tundra’s heart. For the current model year, Toyota ditched the base 4.6-liter i-Force V8, leaving the 5.7-liter (381 horsepower, 401 lb-ft) V8 as the sole available mill. That’s the same engine that returned just over 13 mpg in less-than-strenuous driving conditions a couple years back.

Yes, the Tundra is long overdue for some weight loss and refinement.

The trademark application gives us no details on the nature of the i-Force Max engine, though it has long been rumored that the upcoming Tundra, due to appear in 2021 (possibly as a 2022 model), will make use of a twin-turbo 3.5-liter V6 hybrid setup sourced from the Lexus line. Power is expected to the tune of 450 hp and 500 lb-ft, catapulting the Tundra into competitive territory, and not just for its power figures.

It’s possible i-Force Max refers to this boosted powertrain. That said, there’s still no confirmation from Toyota about the hybrid system, nor is there word about what a base engine might look like. Presumably, it would be the twin-turbo V6 minus the electric assist. The same haze surrounds the next-gen truck’s rear suspension, seen shrouded in curtains in recent spy photos and rumored to carry coil springs or an air system.

Whatever form the Tundra takes, it will have its work cut out for it. Detroit made good use of its development dollars in recent years (some might place an asterisk next to GM on that list), and the Tundra will have to make a big impression on these devout buyers to get noticed. Existing Tundra owners will, of course, return to the Toyota dealer to trade in their old rig on a new one. Their loyalty knows no bounds.

[Images: Toyota]

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36 Comments on “Trademark Filing Serves As a Reminder That Yes, a New Toyota Tundra Is on the Way...”


  • avatar
    cprescott

    Toyoduh will forever be remembered as the brand of trucks terrorists and militants depend on. Everyone else? Not so much. I cannot figure out Toyoduh – they’ll waste hundreds of millions in shrinking market segments for the hideous Camry, but they won’t invest that money into a highly profitable segment like full-sized trucks. Toyoduh and Nissan and GM make third rate full-sized trucks because they all refuse to invest what it takes to be a leader. These clowns are satisfied with the crumbs that Ford and Ram leave them.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      3rd rate full size trucks? I suppose that is why the Tundra is the most reliable pickup truck by any metric (and as measured by Consumer Reports). This is probably also why the Land Cruiser is the NATO field ops vehicle of choice. Because they are third-rate. Yeah, thats it.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Anything that ancient should be the most reliable on Earth. Like if they re-popped the ’52 Nash.

        Reliability is overrated anyway. Especially when it means losing out on the latest tech/gadgetry. Plus those goofy surveys will severely ding an automaker’s “Reliability” for infotainment and controls that are hard to understand and or problematic

        And it’s not like McDonald’s. Tundra or Titan, take it or leave it, you CAN’T have it your way.

        Besides, who wants to own anything past the warranty/lease anyhow? You know the automaker is gonna leave you high-N-dry 10 years in or sooner.

        But can I suggest buying the most popular mainstream available? I giggle my A$$ off when normal to obscure parts for my ’05 F-150 are always in-stock and easy reach at my corner auto parts. Crazy cheap too.

      • 0 avatar

        I can challenge you that Crown Victoria is more reliable than Tundra.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        cprescott is Toyota’s EBFlex. A Toyota hater all the way.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          No, cprescott is a former Ford owner who got hosed by his ride of choice. Now a Hyundai fan, as long as it treats him well. Which is not unlike many other people.

          The Toyota Fanboi Reality Distortion Field is real around here. The Yoda boys just can’t handle any criticism of their brand. If you do, you’ll get folks who remember their (insert domestic or Euro car here) from 1975 and how awful it was.

          Lather, rinse, repeat.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      “brand of trucks terrorists and militants depend on”

      huh… um… if you say so. Having done my part to eliminate/destroy/disable as many of “those trucks” as possible, id sure like to have one. They got shot up, beat up, blown up and neglected (oil change – whats that?); and many of them kept running.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      If a civil war/insurgency occurred on USA soil, they aren’t going to import a bunch of Toyoduh’s. They’ll use what is most commonly available. For most people, that is a rather simple point to grasp.

      But since you are on a terrorist rant………. google “Mark’s plumbing truck”.

      https://www.cnn.com/2015/12/14/us/terror-truck-lawsuit/index.html

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I respect Toyota’s fear of going all-in. The Big 3 make it look too easy, but Toyota isn’t fooled. It would take tremendous investing/commitment with no guarantee. Plus catering to Fleets, committing to huge rebate, infinite variability/options/engines/tech/gadgetry/configurations and of course the cheapskate bottom feeders.

      Also commercial/industry “Fleets Sales” figures/stats get lumped together with rental cars.

    • 0 avatar
      rev0lver

      There’s something wrong with you keyboard.

    • 0 avatar
      Pmedic048

      You obviously have your head up your backside! 1st Toyota is the ONLY truck that has multiple trucks both Tundra and Tacoma to reach over a million miles on original gas motors. 2nd Toyota Tundra has been the most reliable and best resale value for multiple yrs in a row. 3rd The tundra is also the ONLY pickup that is built with over 80% AMERICAN MADE COMPONENTS!! Toyota is not like Ford, Dodge or Chevy that will throw a bunch of crap together in a yr and roll it out to only have mass recalls on trannies, electrical issues or motor fails cause they didn’t do a real world R&D testing cause they chasing the dollar. How come the big 3 always have to give massive rebates to sell their crap? Toyota never have rebates and by the way the best selling, most sold vehicle for about 40+ yrs now is the Toyota Carolla.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    cprescott–

    What a bunch of nonsense your post is. In the third quarter of last year GM actually sold more trucks than Ford. That being said-no matter which truck one wants to buy in the half-ton segment-you can’t go wrong with any of the big three.

    BTW-Google cash reserves holdings that Toyota has-you can do as much or as little as one wants when your sitting on that kind of cash.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Just here for all the “Twin Turbo V6’s are great truck motors” since Toyota is finally getting around to it.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Twin Turbo V6 .

    Toyota, say good bye to @highdesertcat. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Many current 5.7L Tundra owners have been dreading this day where Toyota drops the 5.7L from the Tundra/Sequoia lines. Truly a wonderful engine formerly only found in Ferrari and other exotics.

      My guess is the 5.7L is just too expensive to make because people who choose to buy a pickup truck don’t care about fuel efficiency and mpgs.

      When I get ready to buy another 4-door long-distance traveling truck, I’ll have to re-assess.

      Sigh.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Ferrari doesn’t use truck engines, nor do other exotics. They’re usually like 3.8 V8s, all aluminum, flatplane cranks and rev to the moon. And lots more HP than Torque.

        The 5.7 is a great V8, but let’s not get crazy. And I would take the worst (American) V8 over most V6 turbos.

        But the 5.7 is a habitual gas guzzler since Tundras are geared to tow space shuttles and whatnot and you can’t opt for regular gears.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “Ferrari doesn’t use truck engines, nor do other exotics.”

          Of course they don’t. I am referring to the concept of a light-weight all-aluminum, 32-valve, DOHC 5.7L (348 cubic inch) V8, in a PICKUP TRUCK, for chrisake.

          What’s wrong with you? Do you know of any other pickup trucks in the US with such as engine and displacement? The Titan 5.6L is a cast-iron block, and the steering handles accordingly.

          “the 5.7 is a habitual gas guzzler ”

          So what?

          Not everyone cares about fuel economy or mpgs. Those who do care about mpgs and fuel economy ought not to buy a pickup truck!

          That’s the great thing about America. We gave choices. And America has the oil production to back it up. Numero uno! That’s number 1 on the planet!!!

          Gas is $1.969 at the Shamrock down the street from me, and will be even lower tomorrow.

          Dirt cheap! And good, clean gas from PEMEX in Mexico by way of the West Texas fuel distribution system.

          Life just doesn’t get any better than that.

          Did you have a bad day or night, or something?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Sorry it’s hard to tell when you’re serious or clowning, politics aside.

            DOHCs and aluminum blocks are hardly “exotic”, and totally unnecessary in big trucks, or V8s for that matter.

            The aluminum weight savings is marginal, and offset by the DOHC anyway. Yeah I realize aluminum and iron expand and contract at different rates, except gas V8s aren’t known for eating head gaskets.

            I was actually defending the 5.7. It’s not the problem, gearing is. And 13 mpg is fine with me (too)!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            The bottom line is that I am VERY SAD if/when the 5.7L Tundra V8 goes away. I’ve had three of them since 2011.

            My wife told me earlier this afternoon, after I posted my 3:02pm comment, “If it is going to affect you this much, maybe you should go and buy a 2020 before they quit making them.”

            I told her that it would make no sense to do that since our travel schedule is why we divested ourselves from the Sequoia and my last Tundra.

            And I reminded her that she was also the motivator behind me putting a deposit on the Rivian truck. Something I am REALLY looking forward to, for running around the El Paso, TX, area. I know I can’t go VERY far in that truck but I think it would be kinda cool.

            But for long-distance Interstate driving we’d need a large SUV, mostly for my wife who does not travel light.

            She told me we’d cross that bridge when we come to it, once we settle down and quit traveling, and that she would be happy with a Suburban, or maybe even a Grand Wagoneer.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            That’s alright, I went into a dark place when the EFI 460 was killed off. Then came the killing of the 4.6 V8, don’t get me started. Life goes on and by the end of the Coyote’s life cycle, I’m sure it’ll be just as bulletproof and legendary.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            So you’ve been through the same fears and lows that I am going through now.

            I love gnarly V8s. The more robust, the better.

            The industry can try to pull the wool over the buyers’ eyes with smaller, more efficient, high-strung, heavy breathing squirrel engines, but the true aficionados will always see through that fog mandated by the gov’t.

            How can a Turbo-4 Silverado be better than a 350, 427 or 454?

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Heh! Toyota Fanboi Reality Distortion Field in effect! Catch it while you can…

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Soooooo….Why can’t I get this motor in a Supra?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Which freakout would have been bigger? The freakout that happened because the Supra is a restyled BMW, or the freakout that would have happened had the Supra had a V6 instead of the straight-six?

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        On this website, it’s certainly the former.

        Speaking only for myself, it’s more admirable to me to design something internally, accepting the compromises of off-the-shelf components, than to mail in the effort entirely by badge engineering a vehicle made by a competitor.

        I’d have been legitimately interested in a Supra based off a downsized RC offering Toyota’s V6.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Hard to say. The 416hp/442lb-ft on the Lexus V6T is pretty legit. And I’m sure they could have retuned it to 450hp/470lb-ft but wouldn’t have because they’re Toyota. I think a big thing for people is that they expect a Toyota to be reliable for 300k miles while the BMW could be ready for the boneyard at 75K.

        OTOH, I actually do like a lot about current BMWs. That engine is quite a sweetheart and it punches a full class above its spec sheet. An I6 BMW sports car for $50K makes me pretty happy.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Does it even matter? You can get your “Supra” with a turbo 4 next year.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Yea, I like the GR Supra, but offering one with an I4T is a haram move and definitely blows up the “having an I6 in the Supra is very important, guyz” argument.

  • avatar

    The Tundra won’t have a rubbish interior.

    GM – what a disgrace!

  • avatar
    Dan

    Toyota: Pulls out all the stops and spends a chitload of money to raise the truck bar pretty much across the board. Gets to market just in time for catastrophic gas prices and the great recession.

    Toyota: Burned so badly by that that they carryover that truck through an entire second generation and miss six years of spectacular truck sales in a boom market with cheap fracking gas.

    Toyota: Sees that and finally puts the money in for a real redesign to get some of those sales.

    Toyota: Gets their second try to market just in time for the Corona virus recession that will probably sweep the CAFE and fracking ban party back in power in its aftermath.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The Tundra is a great truck reliability-wise, but an also-ran feature- and technology-wise. I think they’re content with the number of sales they get, but I think they shouldn’t be content with their dismal fuel economy and lack of features.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m more interested in how many gears in the trans and what fuel economy is going to look like.

    Maybe the 5.7 iForce as a base engine with TT as the upgrade? Perhaps 5.7 gains dual injection like many other Toyota Motors.

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