By on January 24, 2020

2017 Toyota Highlander profile

One of your author’s biggest pet peeves is the complete lack of confidence some drivers have in their own abilities — and that of their vehicle. It’s an odd thing, as these days the rolling stock on any street or highway consists mainly of car-based CUVs outfitted with increasingly capable all-wheel drive systems.

You’d think these drivers would show a little less trepidation when the weather turns bad — after all, they bought that particular vehicle for a reason — but no. After a recent, fairly heavy dump of the white stuff, the irksome observations began all over again. But an incident last night revealed the one thing that seems capable of motivating such drivers into taking action and using their vehicle to its full, confidence-inspiring potential: frustration.

Driving back from the store, traffic on the four-lane arterial came to a dead halt. One minute became two, then three. What gives?

The roadblock came in the form of a car carrier angled across the roadway; trailer blocking both lanes, tractor stuck on the wide, snowy median, nose protruding into opposing traffic. Traction wheels spun uselessly in the densely packed snow. Exactly what this driver was attempting to do when he got stuck, a hundred yards from the nearest intersection, is a mystery to me; the boys standing outside the adjacent GM dealership seemed similarly perplexed.

As the driver of a compact car, clearly, I was going nowhere. Not so with the drivers around me, many of whom sat behind the wheels of ubiquitous AWD crossovers. After politely staying put for a few more minutes, the situation soon became intolerable; getting a suitable tow rig to this locale was taking a long time, and the operation to extract the semi couldn’t take place without a cop to shut down the oncoming lanes. So, these drivers finally did the thing most CUVs avoid their entire lives: they went off-roading.

The first to mount curb and tackle the snow (which sat atop a nice layer of ice) was a Toyota Highlander. Kids clearly needed to be fed somewhere. Others drivers followed, giving their rear differentials a long-avoided workout. Maybe now they’ll be more confident in their daily driver, no longer creeping around corners at glacial speeds or undercutting speed limits by half just because two flakes fell from the sky.

On interstate medians and near interchanges, muddy tire tracks through the grass make it clear that nicely maintained blacktop isn’t the only way to get around in the city.

Have you ever had to call upon your own grit — and your vehicle’s brawn — to reach an urban destination in an avant-garde (and likely less than legal) manner? If not, have you seen someone else pull off a ballsy move that ended in success?

[Image: Chris Tonn/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

57 Comments on “QOTD: Taking the Short Way Home?...”


  • avatar
    vvk

    Probably has more to do with worn out tires to the point where most people have no confidence in their vehicle.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Geez, we have to make up our minds around here. The usual drumbeat is the OVER confidence of SUV/CUV drivers who think they can just barrel through any situation because they have AWD. So, which is it?

    My personal experience is both, either people are too timid and underestimate their car’s ability or they’re too aggressive and end up in a ditch. How about good ol’ defensive driving with a bit of giving the other guy a break, we all screw-up from time to time, be patient

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I don’t think it’s CUV or vehicle based, it’s the driver. I’ve driven in some nasty blizzard in an AWD / 4X4 – taking it easy because I’m in no rush to get in an accident. Only to be passed – on the unplowed side of the road – buy a FWD sedan. Some people are just impatient; something I can be guilty of too. But if I’m sliding a lot – with aggressive offroad or snow tires – then I’m slowing down.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      “Geez, we have to make up our minds around here. The usual drumbeat is the OVER confidence of SUV/CUV drivers who think they can just barrel through any situation because they have AWD. So, which is it?” – amen

      The bottom line is: if they’re going faster than me they’re a maniac and if they’re slowing me down they’re in idiot.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      @Lie2me: “. How about good ol’ defensive driving with a bit of giving the other guy a break, we all screw-up from time to time, be patient”

      A-frickin-men

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @Lie2me: Believe it or not, I agree with your sentiment. Just because you have some form of 4WD/AWD doesn’t mean you can drive rough weather as though the roads were dry (you can imagine how many of that sort I see.) However, it does usually take one adventurous soul to find a way around such a situation as described–roadway/shoulders permitting–before others will make such an attempt. Problem then becomes one of somebody WITHOUT said 4WD/AWD ability trying to do the same… and failing.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I have to say, about 15 years back, I was driving to Boston, and hit a snowstorm in Connecticut. So, for 2 hours I was driving through lots of snow in my famous Protege. There were 6 cars that have slid off the road that I saw. All SUVs

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          “So, for 2 hours I was driving through lots of snow in my famous Protege. There were 6 cars that have slid off the road that I saw. All SUVs”

          Nothing special about a Protege on winter roads. Same as any other front wheel drive, one wheel wonder car.

          All those SUV’s that slid off the road into the ditch did so because their owners were too stupid to throw them into 4WD.

          Throw my ’07 Chevy ‘Hoe into “Auto” on the snowiest of winter roads & you couldn’t slide that truck into ditch or spin it out no matter how hard you tried. Seriously, you couldn’t.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Construction on a side road, normal two lanes on each side cut down to one – with a clear no left turn sign at the intersection. And of course someone waits to make a left turn, stopping the mass of traffic behind them from going anywhere.

    I was driving my beater T100 truck. I angled the wheels up, popped the passenger side wheels up on the area between the sidewalk and curb and drove around the idjit.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    This article is based on an assumption, “It’s an odd thing, as these days the rolling stock on any street or highway consists mainly of car-based CUVs outfitted with increasingly capable all-wheel drive systems.”

    After admittedly a very perfunctory search the best information I came up with was 6 years old and stated that only 17.5% of non-truck sales were AWD/4wd.

    Factor in the number of older vehicles and given that AWD/4wd sales have gained strength and what is the actual number of vehicles on the road with AWD/4wd?

    After more than 4 decades of driving, I have been stuck in the snow exactly twice and ‘off road’ once. Once in the snow due to youthful stupidity, once in an AWD vehicle and off road in a 4wd vehicle.

    Both of the latter cases because I overestimated the vehicles’ abilities.

    Driving RWD/FWD vehicles I have been stuck exactly once (knock wood), because I try to respect the vehicles’ limitations.

    And then there is the discussion regarding the number of pick-ups AWD/4WD vehicles scattering the medians/shoulders of highways in snow storms because the drive overestimates their ability to defeat the laws of physics.

    After all, for decades police in Canada and elsewhere had no problems operating Plymouth Furys and Ford Crown Victorias year round.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Arthur, it’s not just about getting stuck it’s about the additional control and stability that an AWD with winter tires gives a vehicle. Sure you’ll get there without them, but I don’t exactly like the feeling of driving by the seat of my pants in bad weather

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Won’t disagree. However if/when an AWD/4wd vehicles is pushed beyond its limits on ice/snow, then it is most likely well beyond the limits of the driver and therefore ends badly.

        Whereas in a FWD/RWD vehicle, there is more of a tendency to appreciate and stay within the vehicles limitations.

        Much like it is better for most drivers to drive ‘a slow car fast’. The consequences of pushing it too hard being much less severe and more recoverable.

        Or to quote Harry Callahan: “A man’s got to know his limitations”.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “it’s about the additional control and stability that an AWD with winter tires gives a vehicle’

        I find that “extra” ability lulls people into a false sense of security. They “over-drive” road conditions and then get into a bad situation. i.e. slide off the road or plow into someone.

        I tend to leave my F150 in 4×2 mode unless the roads are exceptionally bad. I find that the “early warning” of two rear wheels slipping keeps me much more alert and focused as well as lowers my speed.

        Statistically SUV’s are the most common vehicle to be involved in a single vehicle rollover.

        I do believe that the majority of people aren’t very skilled at driving. Driving for most people is the most dangerous thing they will ever do but most people believe they are good to excellent drivers. Statistically 1/3 of drivers should not have a licence.

  • avatar
    jtk

    I have seen someone in a small crossover drive up onto a cement median, drop their tires on the other side, and become high centered except longwise, if you get what I mean. I LOLd.

  • avatar
    SSJeep

    I dont think its a CUV thing. Its probably a combination of simply too much traffic during adverse conditions and distracted drivers. Most people dont want to rip the lower skirts and flares off of their new vehicle, so they wont jump a curb out of caution.

    That said, I did get good use of the GC’s off-road 2 air suspension in a similar setting and was able to easily clear a 6″ concrete median during a pileup investigation.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I can think of one where things “ended well” but it was kind of hilarious in a way.

    Wife owned a 2005 Pontiac VIbe for roughly 10 years, which included our first child’s birth and into her first 2 years of life. One morning when trying to get her to the sitter while the interstate was down to one plowed lane she got frustrated and pulled out into the unplowed lane downshifted (it was a manual trans) to pass and promptly went off the road into the grassy median. (Just her and the baby). Scared the living daylights out of her but a little rocking got her safely back on the road. She dropped off our daughter and headed to work.

    Got to work and realized that she had lots of grass, snow, stones etc packed up under the body. The day warmed up and the helpful gentlemen who worked there offered to use a pressure washer to clear things out underneath.

    She was much embarrassed and much humbled.

  • avatar
    Jon

    Not related to weather, rather youthful stupidity.

    I was stationed in Germany in my 20’s. Just outside of post was the fabled autobahn. My friend wanted to attend a concert several hours away. Instead of riding the train, like most normal joes, he rented a “fast” BMW 3 Series because he wanted to test his masculinity at highway speeds, the evening before he left for the concert. Several of his friends, including me, wanted to witness this great feat of driving prowess; so we rode along.

    Traffic was light (non-existent) and weather conditions were right for an attempt at a personal best speed record. He merged onto the autobahn and unleashed the furry of the six cylinder powered sedan. 80… 100… 110… 120… 125mph!. At this point he was focused on the road but began to brag about how great of a driver he was, how he rented the FASTEST car on post, how much fun he was having, etc. One friend encouraged him to go faster to which he replied that the car didn’t have much left. He maintained the top speed of the car for a few more seconds. Suddenly his boisterous highly positive self evaluation was cut short when an Audi wagon came ROARING past us. All passengers in the car became silent. In unison, everyone started laughing at him as he slowed to a safer speed.

    The self compliments became curses directed at the car… then the rental company for lying to him about the car being the fastest they had… then at his friends for being overweight and making the car go slow… then at himself for taking too many friends on the ride. His blame game was interrupted by one passenger loudly stating, “or you just suck at driving bro”. A volcano of unclear youthful obscenity erupted from his mouth that lasted all the way back to post. At this point, all passengers could not stop laughing until he stopped in front of the barracks. In typical 11B fashion, my newly humbled friend directed everyone except his best friend to leave the car. He mumbled something about trying again without all the fatbodies in his car and sped off. We laughed all the way to our rooms.

    RIP Blodgett

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Lack of confidence is certainly more frustrating. You know that car in front of you can keep up with traffic, or make the turn in something faster than an snail’s pace, or dart out onto the road when a break in traffic occurs.

    However frustrating it is, asking timid drivers to drive beyond their comfort level is probably a recipe for disaster.

    Personally, I love overconfident drivers. There is really nothing more heartwarming than seeing a 4WD stuck in a snowbank, or seeing a pickup truck hung up because they overestimated their breakover. Driving by their plight in my FWD sedan really puts the cherry on top of the shadenfreude.

    As was said above by another poster, RDW sedans once ruled the roost even in the snowbelt and people managed. For 99.9% of urban/suburban drivers, the offroad, or perceived offroad/foul weather capabilities of their vehicles are basically useless. Buy some snow tires and reasonably sized car and save the rest of us from having to look at your jacked up brick that is useless for its intended purpose for 364 days a year.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Lack of confidence is truly frustrating.

      I would pass BMW drivers in my wife’s old Pontiac Vibe – probably much of what gave me distain for the “Ultimate Driving Machine”

      My current favorite is when say a gentleman in a Sierra Denali will go flying past me on the interstate (both of us exceeding the speed limit BTW) only for me to catch up with him when we are taking the same exit. He goes down the cloverleaf at 5 under the posted suggestion while my German built Buick is more than capable of taking it at 15 over the suggestion.

      Empty entrance exit ramps bring me tears of joy due to the stupidity of my fellow drivers

      • 0 avatar
        don1967

        Send the gentleman up to me, Dan.

        These trucks are decently agile, enough so that taking off-ramps at 70% of the (truck’s) limit is enough to shake off the average Ultimate Driving Machine tailgater/poseur.

        It’s become such a guilty pleasure in my Silverado that I have to remind myself not to fixate on the rear view mirror.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “These trucks are decently agile’
          A few summers ago I was taking a back highway home. It winds up and over a mountain and then back down. I caught up to a guy in a Mercedes AMG SUV. He was crawling around the corners.It took forever for me to get around him since he had the HP to pull away on the short straights. He eventually got the message and let me by. I never saw him in my mirrors for the remainder of my journey.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        It is a rare occasion, but when you are being harassed for one reason or another by a pickup or SUV and an onramp or tight but fairly high speed turn comes into play. You like tailgating me? Try to keep up through this turn lol. Its been quite some years ago now, but I recall one particularly funny event where a pickup tried to keep up with my old Mazdaspeed6 on the I375 turn onto Jefferson in Detroit. If you arent familiar with it, the highway dumps out into a rather abrupt and tight turn onto surface roads. The result was comic gold.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I was once on a twisty two lane through NM wilderness when a I got to witness a V6 Altima try to keep up with an old (think origami folded styling) AWD Legacy Sedan.

          Comedy gold as the Subaru driver hand the skills to leave him in the dust.

          Few greater pleasures than being able to go 45 mph through something where the suggested speed is 25 mph or so.

      • 0 avatar
        Moparmann

        @ PrincipalDan I agree w/ you. I daily observe instances where people sit, afraid to go forward or move due to an inability to judge distances e.g., stop/drive too far from a curb, turn into the middle of a 16′ wide driveway in their compact car, make turns straying into the other lanes (I’ve even observed LEO’s doing this!), etc. IMO, there is a SERIOUS deficit of driving skills being taught today. I love to take sweeping exit/entrance ramps higher than the posted speeds, never exceeding the limits of my vehicle!! :-)

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I do find it odd when people ask me how I can drive a RWD car in the snow. Even my dad, who did it for years, seems shocked that I can somehow get around, even on the worst days.

      Uh – I was driving a RWD 1984 Nissan truck (very light!) in 1987. And my first vehicle I bought out of college was a RWD only 1994 Nissan truck. And a 1991 Caprice. And a 1981 Malibu wagon. And a 1994 Buick Roadmaster. And a 2004 BMW 325i. Now a 2014 V6 Mustang.

      You just do it. Add some winter tires, which I just recently started doing, and life becomes even easier.

      I’m actually a little scared of many AWD/4X4 drivers because even though they have better traction than me, they aren’t stopping any quicker in ice with all season tires. On Monday I slid down a very icy hill, ABS locked on, Michelin X-Ice tires digging in, and managed to stop with plenty of room. The Equinox behind me, however, was scary to watch as he just slid and slid. Luckily he managed to grab onto some snow and change lanes before hitting the back of my car.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Dear Ol’ Dad’s work vehicles (B-body wagons and 2wd trucks) taught me much about snow driving.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Just don’t pump the brakes anymore. It took me forever to unlearn that

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            There’s quite a good chance that the Equinox driver had his or her foot to the floor and the wheel clenched in terror. GM ABS systems, in my experience, don’t handle snow well at all. They keep the wheels rolling at all costs, meaning you sometimes just … don’t … stop.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @SPPPP: After a personal experience with a GM anti-lock system that wouldn’t UN-lock on ice, I would much rather have some steering control on a downhill curve than slide straight ahead and potentially down a cliff. Granted, this was nearly 25 years ago but I was on what some claim is “black ice” where I was already going dead slow and more than 1000 feet from a traffic light that was turning red. Using the lightest possible pedal pressure, I could tell in an instant when the brakes locked because I couldn’t steer–as soon as I released the brakes, I could steer. So even with anti-lock brakes, I was “pumping” manually, as gently as possible, and finally came to a full stop… in the middle of the intersection.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            SPPPP,

            “GM ABS systems, in my experience, don’t handle snow well at all. They keep the wheels rolling at all costs, meaning you sometimes just … don’t … stop.”

            On some vehicles of a certain vintage, it is possible on the ‘right’ (wrong) type of snow to press the brake pedal relatively gently and engage the ABS. The driver feels the ABS engaging and doesn’t press the brake pedal any harder. The vehicle proceeds to slide right through the intersection with the brakes gently applied and the ABS activated. (At this point the driver decides that ABS is useless.)

            The ABS is not *applying* the brakes, it is actually *interrupting* their application.

            The key is to *press the brake pedal harder* – as in much harder – the ABS will still activate, but the vehicle will come to a stop much more quickly.

            [I believe a lot of people who run off the road in the snow have never experienced a loss of traction until that moment when they completely lose it. I encourage people to get a feel for their ABS system/etc in a safe place when it snows.]

      • 0 avatar
        ravenuer

        dividebytube: my dad taught me how to drive rwds in the snow. Main thing he said was don’t ever stop. Keep it moving at (almost) all costs! Don’t recall ever getting stuck.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “my dad taught me how to drive rwds in the snow”

          My dad never felt a need for a 4×4. All he had was RWD F250’s with deep lug mud/snow tires and tire chains. He taught me to drive as well.

          I only use 4×4 when conditions are bad. I got in the habit of running in 4×2 because I used to spend a massive amount of spare time in the backcountry alone. If I could not get to where I wanted in 4×2 mode, I’d engage 4×4 to get myself back out and then go home. I’d try later with buddies along for rescue purposes or go in on my dirt bike.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I tell you this. Even in sedan, I would still look if I can cross something to escape. And if I would think that those Highlanders made a path good enough for my sedan to go through, I would go.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    If you are going to leave the road, just remember that snow can hide obstacles. I took my Jeep through a parking lot flooded with water and snow, and found that there were indeed some curbs in there.

    It is ironic that AWD has become so prevalent. At least in the Boston area, the only real threat is traffic. If there is ever snow or ice, it is dealt with pretty quickly with massive amounts of salt. I can’t remember the last time the roads were slippy for any extended amount of time. And as always, the real constant threat is traction for braking.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    My experience up here in the great white north is that as winter goes on people get more confident in their driving, and hence make more poor decisions. Like I did this morning on the off-ramp when hitting some ice I damn well would have slowed down for 30 days ago. Thank you traction control, the only driving ninny I support in 100% of all vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “My experience up here in the great white north is that as winter goes on people get more confident in their driving, and hence make more poor decisions.”

      I’d have to completely disagree with that being a native of Minnesota. Same thing every year with the first snow of the winter in Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area. Wrecks everywhere as most have forgotten over the summer how to drive on snow covered roads.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    For me, snowy driving isn’t so much about the driving as it is about the road.
    I’ve found that multi-lane roads often become so obscured with snow that no one knows where the hell the lanes are. So everyone just kinda makes their own lane- I can see the tires tracks going all over the place. This is even worse on Interstates with six or eight lanes.
    I always choose 2-lane back roads and streets in the snow. Everyone follows the same track, so the wheelpaths are cleared better. In general, the local municipal and township plow crews will be out plowing sooner than the state DOT guys who are based farther away. In a nasty blizzard, 30 mph on an empty side street or back road is a lot better than 30 mph on a highway with hundreds of other cars trying to crash into you.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Mike Beranek – I personally get annoyed with the formation of “Single track” on residential streets. I see pristine lifted 4×4 trucks afraid to drive in the snow and “break trail” so we have a 2 lane path.

  • avatar

    I agree with the above that people are either super timid or extremely reckless.

    Cars are safer, faster, more capable, and more economical than they were for decades in he past.

    Still people merge into a freeway in a V6 Accord doing 42 miles per hour.

    It’s just driver stupidity, not the capability of the cars. Most people are TERRIBLE at driving normally, and it gets worse in slick conditions. They don’t pay attention or judge the road conditions, they just panic.

    The sensors and safety nets have turned off the brains.

  • avatar
    TR4

    Spring of ’72, I was a senior in high school. Bomb threats were the latest thing, presumably to get out of class for a while. Some of us with cars would simply drive home to avoid having to stand outside while the cops searched the school. One time some teachers decided to block the two parking lot entrance/exits. So I drove my ’60 SAAB 93 up onto the grass over the curb and back down onto the main road and headed home, fogging some of the teachers with the blue smoke from the cold two stroke engine. Felt great and luckily caught no flak from it.

  • avatar
    Dan

    On confidence: 99% don’t have enough but the 1% that do are the ones that fail spectacularly and make for a good story afterwards.

    On failing spectacularly: speed, speed, speed.

    So man up and try it, but woman up and try it slow.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    We got around 4 inches of snow overnight. I had to drive 60miles one way to work. I purposely started late, and the highways were cleared but very slushy.There were the usual fwd sedans off the road. 4 that I counted, but what surprised me was the B5 A4.
    Occasionally you’ll see an WRX or A6 driver going way over sane speeds, but most of the time they can keep it on the road.Interestingly , I’ve never seen an off’d Subaru, whereas it’s common to see “Brodozer down” in these parts.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    First rain in CA another couple is culled from roads. I stay home.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    One of the main reasons I own a Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk is because it has QDII, which is the best 4wd system they offer for the Grand Cherokee. And of course it also comes with air suspension and the full terrain control system. It’s virtually unstoppable even in the worst conditions imaginable. I live on the ridge of a mountain in New York, so I have to go uphill and downhill to get home or leave home. Too many times I found myself behind stuck cars trying to get home, so now I’ll never have a problem getting around them in any circumstances with my Jeep. A nice side benefit is the off-road capability of the Jeep just for fun. It will pretty much do anything a Wrangler will do off-road. I purchased the Jeep for a reason and I’m not getting stuck if I have any option of getting around other vehicles that are stuck. Of course I also carry a hitch shackle and tow strap to help pull stuck cars out on several occasions.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I wish we’d have a little more timidity on the few occasions when it snows around here. It’s hilly and usually icy given our weather patterns.

    One of those few times was early last week. I live on the side of a steep hill, and the road by my house is about a 12% grade. And plenty of idiots headed down it at 35 mph as if it were dry out. I’m sure there were plenty of puckered sph!ncters down at the bottom. I’m also sure it’s just a matter of time before one of them plows into my car parked along the curb.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    Back in the ’90s I had a Supra Turbo with no snow tires on it. My girlfriend at the time insisted on being driven back home after a Christmas day visit with friends, even though the roads were starting to ice up. It got to the point that the Supra would barely stay on the road due to the crown of the road. I got to the exit off of the limited access road, and could not get up the hill of the exit ramp, so I pulled off of the road. All traffic came to a halt shortly thereafter. After sitting around for an hour or so, I found that I could drive up the exit ramp on the grass by the side of the road, which gave more traction than the iced up road surface. I did get her home that night. She is now my wife.
    So that is my “off-roading” experience with a Supra Turbo. I have had no difficulties with my subsequent Audis.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I tell you this. Last Sat we had some snow dump. I took my 2019 Highlander to most unplawed streets, upheel, etc. I turned on AWD monitor but did not lock the differential. I gave it a good gas and it was interesting to see how monitor was displaying power distribution. Never seen rear wheels power go that high. As well, the CUV was just dead center itself. It didn’t slide right to left, nada. Just straight and up the slick street. I liked that.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    After the last big snowfall we had in my neck of the woods there were a fair number of cars, pickups, SUVs and CUVs, and larger trucks all slid off the highways. The thing that struck me was that conventional cars were all stuck, but still upright; while the pickups, SUVs and CUVs and larger trucks had all rolled over on their sides. Higher centers of gravity, I guess.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    I’m convinced entitled rich ladies love Range Rovers because they can drive over curbs, sidewalks, etc. whenever they want to pull past someone or something in a fit of pique.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    The thing that always unnerves me is the conga-line in the left lane. 900 dingbats on each others’ back bottom – one hits his brakes and the rest panic, slam on their brakes, lots of snaking and people flying off into adjacent lanes ensues. The year before last, I almost got clipped while driving in the middle lane because some flung themselves out of the conga-line.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Schurkey: They did business with Communists, they’re getting what they deserve. With luck, it’ll nearly...
  • Scoutdude: How far and how often will it be towing the boat, that’s a big factor. Just going across town every...
  • Jagboi: Why do you need a truck? A Crown Vic/Grand Marquis with a frame mounted class III hitch can easily tow the...
  • thornmark: I used to see Allantes w/ water in their tail lights all the time was that a Cadillac feature?
  • thornmark: >>3 or 4 years from now you might be able to pick one of these up for stupid cheap.<< I...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Timothy Cain
  • Matthew Guy
  • Ronnie Schreiber
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth