By on December 13, 2019

Cadillac may be embarking on a nail-biting journey with its electrification plan, but its naming strategy could prove considerably less rocky. Or not. Announced Thursday in Detroit, the premium brand’s evolution to emissions-free status will coincide with a return of actual model names for new vehicles — a move many Cadillac watchers have long hoped for.

Yes, the alphabet soup that comprised all but one member of the Caddy clan will fall by the wayside, replaced by real words. Names that mean something, that stimulate emotion. Ford thought it necessary. Can you guess what we’re going to ask today?

“The rollout of the electric vehicles is the time we’ll start to move back toward naming,” Cadillac President Steve Carlisle said, as reported by Automotive News.

Like Lincoln, Cadillac’s naming strategy for the new Millennium, which applied to all but its grandfathered full-size SUV, sought to emulate European prestige, but only ended up confusing regular people. Talk to your coworker about the XT6 and CT6 and they’ll likely have no idea what model you’re referencing. Sedan, SUV, who knows? Same goes for the MKX and MKZ (add the XTS in there while you’re at it).

Things got even weirder at Cadillac when the brand decided to differentiate power outputs by assigning models a rounded-up torque designation, thus saddling vehicles with even more head-scratching numbers and letters. To make matters worse, that torque figure is in Newton-metres. For the past month, Detroit denizens have spotted CT6 sedans tooling around with “800T” badges.

Tell that coworker you’re now driving a 2020 CT6 800T and see their reaction.

Lincoln eventually came to its senses, replacing the MKC and MKX with Corsair and Nautilus, and resurrecting the Aviator nameplate for good measure. Starting with the yet-to-be-named electric crossover appearing in 2021, Cadillac will do the same.

While many of you disagreed with Cadillac’s (or GM’s) decision to dive whole hog into the world of electrification, this latest tidbit is worthy of its own discussion. Should Cadillac return storied nameplates to the lineup, or forego name recognition and heritage for something more modern?

Fleetwood or Eldorado as an EV utility vehicle?

Discuss.

[Image: General Motors]

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86 Comments on “QOTD: Cadillac’s Bringing Back Names, So Now What?...”


  • avatar
    JimC2

    Inner monologue, “Bring back Cimarron! Bring back Cimarron! If Chrysler can bring back Aspen…”

    Mwuahahahaha!!

    But seriously, I’d go with the names instead of letters and numbers. The only major brand whose numbers are easy to keep straight is BMW, where bigger numbers are clearly either a bigger engine and/or a more expensive model. Unless you’re a Caddy fan or a car nut then it’s not crystal clear if a CT or XT is the more upscale vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “C” and “X” are supposed to denote model type, but using those letters in particular make absolutely no sense to accomplish this.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Aw, man, they had to ruin a good thing.

        And yeah, “four door coupé” is a nonsense term. It makes me want to taunt sales people by interjecting, “two door sedan” into the conversation.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      I disagree with you on BMWs naming convention. What used to be straightforward is now all over the place.
      Lets’ start with the 3 series – small(ish) sedan. Now we’re going to introduce a coupe version of the 3 (never mind that 3-series were available as a coupe a while ago). Coupes tend to be smaller than sedans, should probably call it a 2. Nope, it’s the 4-serires.
      Then there is the 5-series. Where to put it’s two-door version. 6-series? No, not really, the 6-series was a model unto its own for quite a while and they were usually 2-doors. Except now most 6 series are 4-doors – don’t even get me started on the “4-door coupe” thing.
      Then, BMW is bringing its smallest sedan over here, the 1-series and because you shouldn’t have a 0-series, that 2-door version is the 2 series.
      And now all you have to do is throw in some GT versions and the infamous “M”. Some Ms are true Ms while others are only M-like.
      See? It all makes perfect sense.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        All of that and they lie through their teeth about what’s under the hood too. x28i or x30i meant inline six forever, until they suddenly meant garbage four pot instead. Give them another generation and the fours will have inflated their way up the lineup to x50i.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    The last remnants of the de Nysschen republic have been swept away.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      So says Grand Moff Carlisle?

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      De Nysschen joined Cadillac in July 2014 and left in April 2018. I’d argue he had no time to do anything much once he got settled in to his coffee-house digs, considering the lead time for new vehicles. They say he was wholly responsible for the CT6, but I wonder — it was announced at the end of March 2015, when de Nysschen had only been there seven months. Fastest new car design ever, if true.

      Less than four years on the job, and he failed because no giant sales increase happened after the first 6 months despite his original remit that GM gave him to develop brand new cars for 2020 and spend $12 billion. Never got a chance to spend that loot, I’ll be bound, and the new Cadillac “exclusive” 3.6 V6 was being installed everywhere 6 months after, with such a lack of fanfare, most people think today’s GM 3.6 V6 is the same old one that came out on the late oughties.

      The old boys network made sure to judge de Nysschen on criteria never mentioned when he was originally hired, like 2014 sales, and face it, he was parachuted in and upset the executive seniority applecart. He was also a South African, just like Musk, dear oh dear. S’why they put an insider stolid GM man in charge afterwards; he knew that the game is to claim excellence yet accept mediocrity. Nobody told Johan and he wasn’t bright enough to figure it out.

      Less than four years on the job. It seems like double that, doesn’t it? And such a convenient scapegoat to blame everything on.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I fully support this initiative.
    Moreso if it also corresponds with Cadillac attaching the names to worthy/competitive vehicles.

    Heading into my dotage, I would like once again to be able to admire someone’s or be jealous of someone’s new de Ville or Fleetwood.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I just don’t see how names like DeVille, Seville, Fleetwood or El Dorado will work in today’s auto world. Those names were pretentious and conjure up ideals of luxury long forgotten

    Does anyone really want a Brougham in 2020?

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Yes, I do !!!!! :-)

      And so do a great many of my friends, acquaintances and co-workers.

      Quiet, comfortable, spacious, with vestiges of ‘luxury’. Currently those who wish for these often end up driving pick-ups.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      They’ll make up new names which will have no meaning.

      • 0 avatar
        Thomas Kreutzer

        This. Totally this.

        I’ll wager good money that these these new Cadillac “names” (selected by committee of course) are going to end up sounding like the stage names of the pole-swinging gals down at your local tiddy bar…

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          Hehehe, I can see the ad slogans now-

          Slip into our Candi Brougham

          Skye Special Edition is the perfect companion for a night on the town

          Savannah comes standard with augmented soft, supple… (I’ll leave it up to your imagination)

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Thomas, isn’t that the goal? It would be an honor for Cadillac to have model names that find a place alongside Carrera, Lexus and Mercedes. Maybe they should just cheat and call the new cars Crystal, Tiffany, Amber, Brandy and Lola.

          • 0 avatar
            Thomas Kreutzer

            Why not? Volvo is already calling cars “Pole Stars.”

            Now what I wanna know is, whose pole?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Anyone with the requisite cover charge.

          • 0 avatar
            SilverCoupe

            You know that Lola was the name of a race car company in the previous century, right? Their race cars of the 1960’s were often quite beautiful.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I know a fair amount about Eric Broadley’s GTs and champ cars. The Ford GT40 started out as the Lola MK6 before Henry the #2 had his feeling hurt. The list I posted for potential Cadillacs is what you get when you search for the top stripper names.

          • 0 avatar
            Land Ark

            TK: Why not? Volvo is already calling cars “Pole Stars.”

            Now what I wanna know is, whose pole?

            My wife, who is into pole sports and has a pole in our family room, almost bought a Volvo V60 Polestar just because it’s called Polestar. The license plate would not have surprise you.

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          Complete with nonsense spelling.

          This is my 2021 Cadillac EffemRL.
          With the L facing backwards.

      • 0 avatar
        56BelAire

        Many people have been giving their offspring stupid made up names for decades…..why not stupid made up names for cars?

        You can even google “stupid made up names” and get thousands of hits related to the subject…..enough to get yourself busy for days.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Judging from the picture at the top, that model will be the Cadillac Lexusishgrille.
        They could name them after the driver’s attributes: Cadillac Cosmetic Surgery, or the Cadillac ThirdWife.
        Or what the vehicle really is: Cadillac JustanAcadia.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Does anyone really want a Brougham in 2020?”

      nobody not already in a nursing home.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Put me down for one, now if you’ll excuse me I’m late for my sponge bath.Oh, and Matlock is on at 10. Happy days!

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I don’t know if any of them would stroke a check for a new Brougham instead of the Ikea-Geelys they drive now, but there are mid-westerners in their 30s and early ’40s who are nostalgic for broughams and PLCs in a way that is completely absent in this late 40s Gen Xer. I have no idea if it would translate to sales, but they make themselves heard at any number of automotive websites. I suppose it is like when I was a teenager and “Christine” made me think finned cars from the late ’50s were exciting with their horsepower race, styled interiors, and lack of PLC phoniness. Meanwhile, adults remembered them as cars that rusted out in two years and didn’t start in the rain.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      i figure the same people who complained about the alphanumeric soup names will complain about the names they bestow on the new Cadillacs. Cadillac can’t win this; the people who remember the old names are dead and/or don’t buy Cadillacs.
      I can hear it now. That’s not a De Ville! In my day a De Ville always had 8 cylinders…. Repeat.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Cadillac can’t win this because they have a forty-five year track record of doing wrong by their customers, and folks who have retired from commenting on such things used to tell me that they really started cheapening the product in 1968. I do wonder if that wasn’t a perception brought about by the cheap look of GM’s attempts at padded safety dashboards. 1968 Chrysler-Corp intermediates’ dashboards looked like cheap junk compared to 1967 models too, but padded dashboards were a little less likely to be a source of injury in a crash.

        Anyway, if your response to the excellence and manageable dimensions of the S-class was to make a Nova Brougham your flagship, you put under-engineered Oldsmobile diesels in everything, you pitched a Cavalier as a 320i competitor by pricing it like the BMW, you unleashed disastrous engines one after the other that ruined your cars for decades, you put your name on the Suburban, you put your name on an unreliable Opel, you threw your heritage away for alphanumeric names, you made lesser versions of other people’s cars, you refused to put GM’s excellent V8s in your cars but didn’t have a problem pitching a 2-door Volt at double the price, you put pretentious clowns in charge of insulting any remaining customers, and you’re getting in bed with the climate hoaxers destroying the middle class; you don’t get the benefit of the doubt.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          “Anyway, if your response to the excellence and manageable dimensions of the S-class was to make a Nova Brougham your flagship, you put under-engineered Oldsmobile diesels in everything, you pitched a Cavalier as a 320i competitor by pricing it like the BMW, you unleashed disastrous engines one after the other that ruined your cars for decades, you put your name on the Suburban, you put your name on an unreliable Opel, you threw your heritage away for alphanumeric names, you made lesser versions of other people’s cars, you refused to put GM’s excellent V8s in your cars but didn’t have a problem pitching a 2-door Volt at double the price, you put pretentious clowns in charge of insulting any remaining customers, and you’re getting in bed with the climate hoaxers destroying the middle class; you don’t get the benefit of the doubt.“

          In fairness putting their name on a Suburban was the best move they’ve made in at least 30 if not 40 years. Otherwise spot on.

        • 0 avatar
          55_wrench

          ToddAtlas,
          You summed it up almost perfectly.

          The padded dashes really were okay and actually improving by 1968. Ford had them starting about 10 years earlier but most of their offerings (especially ’57 Merc and ’58 squarebird) had especially poor materials that collapsed in just a few years.

          GM started in the mid fifties with padded dashes and improved theirs over time.
          By the late sixties the biggest problem with GM dashes and the rest of the big 3 was the use of Zenith TV-style fake woodgrain and the silly practice of plastichrome highlights of the raised borders of the instrument panels. It was the first thing to wear off and by 3 years was looking terrible.

          Cadillac should never have bought into that. Chrome die castings and real wood should have differentiated them from the rest of the pack, but the dashes from the late 60s up to the late 80s were no different in perceived quality than the Chevrolet offerings.

          Ford wasn’t immune from this either but at least Lincoln did some neat things with padded vinyl and real wood from time to time that set them apart from the rest of the Ford family.

          • 0 avatar
            55_wrench

            Just to add that what Cadillac did from 1967 to the present should be a classic case of brand dilution that should be taught to all new car designers and their managers.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @Todd, Sometimes I think that you are just trolling us. And other times I think that your comments are brilliant. This one falls in the latter category.

          Want America First and to Make America Great Again. Then let’s have the remaining American car manufacturers design and build ‘world class’ autos and give them names that resonate with ‘peak USA’.

          If some of you don’t believe that Cadillac and Lincoln still resonate in at least part of the American consciousness, then watch Goodfellas, A Bronx Tale, or The Irishman and notice how often they show or mention Cadillacs or Lincolns and relate them to luxury or ‘making it’.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I am never just trolling you.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Want America First and to Make America Great Again. Then let’s have the remaining American car manufacturers design and build ‘world class’ autos and give them names that resonate with ‘peak USA’.”

            Step 3 is convince Mr. and Mrs. America to pay the premium for Made in USA. ‘cos time and time again they’ve shown they won’t.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            “Step 3 is convince Mr. and Mrs. America to pay the premium for Made in USA. ‘cos time and time again they’ve shown they won’t.”

            Until voluntary import quotas, the people who bought Detroit cars were paying a premium to buy Made in USA over Japanese. I have a 1977 Car and Driver where the Chevrolet Chevette has a higher as-tested price than the Honda Accord. You’ve got to really think RWD is magical blessing to look at a 1977 Chevette and a 1977 Accord and conclude that the Chevette was a more desirable product.

            Most cars sold in the USA are made in the USA. The trick is selling someone on the UAW premium, which involves buying a lesser product with a higher cost. All those transplant factories are here because it is cheaper to build cars in the USA than to build them in Japan or Germany and ship them here.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          “you put your name on an unreliable Opel”

          Don’t leave out that they then marketed it with a cartoon duck. Classy like Kia’s singing hamsters, except the car listed for $35,000 – at a time when an actual Kia was 10 flat.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Cadillac had spent twenty-five years ignoring enthusiast entreaties to harness big Opel chassis, brake, and OHC engine technology. There was no way on earth they were going to let the Catera succeed. One might think that they willfully replaced the Vauxhall Carlton and Opel Senator with the anonymous Omega B1 in order to make the Cadillac-Opel a failure and in the hope that Saab would pick up the lost customers.

            I think what Cadillac fans were hoping was that they would take the Senator platform and make it their own, like Holden did to make some Commodores in Australia. Instead we got a duck.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      “Does anyone really want a Brougham in 2020?”

      Would that’s be a Bro’uhm, a Bro-hammm, or a Brom?

      There might be buyers for all three!

      Anyway, I’m sure there are plenty of people who want to spend their money on a living room couch on wheels. So in answer to the question, yes, I think a lot of people want to buy a Brougham in 2020. Same reason people buy an Escalade instead of the high end Tahoe.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Other than Eldorado and MAYBE Fleetwood, I don’t see many of Cadillac’s classic nameplates working in the 21st century either. I imagine they’ll be new and people will complain.

  • avatar
    Mnemic

    Old names and more “Americanism” is the only option Cadillac has left. What’s “Americanism”? Something they need to invent but it has to do with combining a 57 fleetwood with a modern escalade. Comfort over lap times, tasteful chrome over monochrome, luxury options not even found in a Rolls, class leading power numbers or range and exclusivity.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    In theory this is great, in practice it will be another Blazer.

    I’ve lost all confidence that Cadillac can produce a desirable vehicle.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Is the commenting format going to revert?

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Nobody really cares.

    This is today’s edition of the: Incompetent GM Culture Executive Clown Sideshow of Knee-jerk Reactions.

    If Mary Barra said to make all Cadillacs smell like fish to increase market share it would happen, and someone else would be blamed for the failure to increase sales in the first 3 months.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So this announcement just after they tooled up to start slapping those stupid Newton Meters of Torque badges on the back of their transportation appliances?

    Ay Caramba – I saw a XT5 in traffic just the other day with one of those stupid badges on it.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    This reminds me of a team that’s 0-15 and decides to go for it on every fourth down during the last game of the year. Why not?

    I wish them nothing but success…and don’t expect them to succeed.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    A d’elegance line for the Escalade, XR7, SR5, or whatever they’re calling their mid-size and kinda-mid-size CUVs these days, complete with two tone paint and wire wheels. Please, please, please, please!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    If it were possible to teach the B&B table manners and provide them with nicer shoes, Cadillac could form an ‘advisory board’ with 10 members from this site and instantly advance about 48 months on their “strategy.”

  • avatar
    How_Embarrassing_4You

    I guess if it somehow puts a bandaid over the boo boo that is garbage vehicles, go for it. At this point they should be open to try anything. Desperation is like that.

  • avatar
    jschuma3

    Cadillac EVs need new names!
    Voltar! (for all the old comic book heroes fans out there)
    Ampere! (with a French accent, of course)
    Resistance! (also so French, nes pas?)
    Currente!
    Grand Batterie! (for the hulking SUV)
    And last, but not least, Ohm I Gawd! (for the vinyl carriage roofs some Cadillac dealer somewhere will find a way to install…)

  • avatar

    When Cadillac cancels the CTV-6 and Black wing engine it tells me the division is not interested in building compelling vehicles. Actually, I am even more concerned that they finished last in consumer reports annual survey two of the last three years.

  • avatar
    1500cc

    Does this mean we have to wait until the just-released CT4 and CT5 are replaced before they get real names? Too bad Steve didn’t act a little quicker to catch these ones at launch.

    A lot of comments above are taking swipes at Caddy’s current vehicles. I’ll admit their FWD CUVs are mid-pack, but their RWD cars have been on par with their German competitors for at least a couple of generations. It’s been their marketing that has sucked, so hopefully this is an indicator of better things to come.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The *chassis* on their RWD cars have been on par with the Germans, and I always liked the styling. Nothing else – particularly the engines in the non-V models and the interiors (and CUE) – has even come close.

      Who thought it was a good idea to put engines straight from a Malibu or Impala in Cadillacs? Dumb, dumb, dumb.

      The ATS and CTS make sense as an off-lease used buy, but put a new one up against a Mercedes, Audi or BMW and there’s no contest.

      It’s a shame – as you say, the chassis setups were great, and that’s no mean feat, but the overall execution was just disappointing.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Being an American automaker chasing an entirely different market segment has been catastrophic to Cadillac, if they want to chase German competitors then they need to destroy them not simply match them.

      The fact of the matter is the German luxury segment is over saturated, whereas the American luxury segment is void of any real products which is where Cadillac needs to shine. More Escalade less 2.0T compliance econo crapbox.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The “traditional American luxury car” market started dying when Reagan was president. But Cadillac was making them until a few years ago – remember the DTS? Big, soft-riding, chromey, V-8 powered. American luxury. People stopped buying them…just like they stopped buying Town Cars and hemi-powered 300s.

        Cadillac’s mistake wasn’t “going German” – it was in going half-a**ed German for a good 20 years before they actually built something that someone who might be interested in a German car would take a look at. Was someone in the market for a BMW or Mercedes really going to shop a Seville or Eldorado with blackout trim? Sure thing. And don’t even get me started on the Catera. And by the time they were building stuff that was actually comparable to the Germans, the bottom fell out on the sedan market.

        If something as good as the original CTS had been brought out in the ’90s, I think it’d be a very different story for them now.

        • 0 avatar
          56BelAire

          @FreedMike….I owned a DTS from 2010 till 2016. It was a great car and did everything and more that I bought it for…..a great road car for western road trips.
          Dead quiet interior, comfy leather heated and cooled seats, very smooth ride, and yes, it actually handled quite well for the large barge it was. Northstar V-8(never had one problem with it), power yet 30-mpg of those great road trips. Great looking in Dark Red Tintcoat with Gray Interior and Chrome Wheels. I actually still find myself pining for it on occasion when planning a trip.
          Replaced with a RX350. Also a great car but I can’t squeeze anymore than 23-23-mpg on road trips…..which I think sucks in this day and age.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    How about using a name from Chevy especially since Cadillac shares parts with Chevy. How about the Cadillac Monte Cargo for a new mini-sized crossover with a 3 pot CVT made in South Korea by GM Daewoo. Add heated leatherette seats and offer it for a bargain price of 40k.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Ultimately it is the quality and performance of the product that matters, not the name. Cadillac is changing it’s product names because it wants to dissociate the new products from the previous mediocre failures. Hopefully the new product will be much more competitive, otherwise, a new boss and naming scheme will arise in 5 years (if they are still in business).

  • avatar
    forward_look

    Dumb question: whaddaya call those ugly left-and-right grille things? What are they supposed to be? Fog lights? Brake cooling intakes?? Or just imitating all the Japanese cars that have them?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If Cadillac doesn’t improve their quality and make their dealer experience better then it won’t matter what they name their vehicles. For most people Cadillac is not thought of as a brand to aspire to as it once was. I can afford a Cadillac but I would not spend that kind of money on any vehicle but I also would not want a used one because they are for the most part expensive to keep up and not reliable. If Cadillac wants to be a luxury EV brand they need to get their act together because they will be competing with Tesla which already has established themselves as the leader in EVs.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    After seeing the injuries a coworker suffered from just a minor wreck in a Courier, and seeing a LUV driver killed in a wreck where even a compact car’s driver would walk away, probably without a scratch…

    Burn them all.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I wouldn’t want to drive any 70’s vehicle as a daily driver regardless of size or type. People got killed or seriously injured in large cars and trucks during the 70’s as well. Today’s vehicles are much safer and for the most part people have a greater chance of surviving a major accident unless they do not wear seat belts. If you are comparing a compact truck from the 60’s and 70’s to any vehicle made today you need to include any large vehicle from the 60’s and 70’s as well because you can just as easily get killed or seriously injured as well. How about comparing a car made in the 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s as well. Today’s vehicles greatly increase chances of surviving a major accident if you wear seat belts and if you don’t wear seat belts then you are more likely to win the Darwin award.

  • avatar

    Since Johan de Nysschen left Cadillac the division is releasing one turkey after another. The worst of all is the XT6, which does the impossible by being over styled (front) and under styled (side) at the same time. The entire V-series has literally been castrated. I think Acura and Infiniti now may have a better performance lineup than Cadillac. What does Cadillac gain by producing lackluster cars and SUVs.

    As for Cadillac being primarily a EV producer by 2030 it is so absurd it is not even worth comment.

  • avatar
    Bobby

    For what it’s worth I think Cadillac should do one of two things; My first proposal wouldn’t exactly bring back “names” but I think it could represent a happy medium between the traditional (i.e. real words) and the modern (the current fad for sterile alphanumerics).

    Waaay waaay back, Cadillac used names like Series 60, Series 61, Series 70, etc. for their models.
    For many years their most prestigious “owner” driven model was the Series 60 Special. So for example, if the CT6 still has a future (or a similar replacement model is planned) I’d use the name “Series 60” for it.
    And while there never was a “Series 50,” I’d hastily re-badge the planned CT5 as “Series 50”
    And the CT4 could be called “Series 40”

    So for Cadillac’s Cars:

    Series 60 (nee CT6)
    Series 50 (nee CT5)
    Series 40 (nee CT4)

    For Crossovers, I’d go back to calling Caddy’s midsize model SRX instead of XT5- (for Sport Recreational Crossover) and maybe XT4 could be called “CRX” (Compact Recreational Crossover). But that would leave the issue of what to rename the new XT6…

    However, if Cadillac’s really looking to go full old-school with its nomenclature, the only ones that would word in the 21st century IMO would be:
    “Escala”
    “Talisman”
    “Eldorado”
    “Fleetwood”
    and maaaybe “Seville”
    “Catera” isn’t as tarnished as Cimarron, nut even that ight be a bridge too far for some.

    Anything “Brougham” or something-De-Ville just sound too pretentious and old-fashioned.

    • 0 avatar
      WildcatMatt

      Reviving the “Series” moniker is an interesting middle-of-the-road approach since it adds context which makes the number more comfortable — in US English, at least. Unfortunately, such a move would satisfy almost no one.

      How about Calais?

      As an exercise, I flipped through my list of GM nameplates looking for names which are fallow but don’t seem *too* evocative of the old brand. Like, I don’t think you’d see a Cadillac Bel Air or a Cadillac Cutlass, for example.

      All I could find were a couple of old Pontiac badges. Catalina? Parisienne?

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