By on December 5, 2019

Introduced last year, Genesis’ third — and newest — model is the G70, a value-packed rear- or all-wheel-drive sports sedan aimed at BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class intenders. We could throw the Jaguar XE in there, too, but no one buys that car.

Like its Kia Stinger platform mate, the G70 kicks up its feet with the help of a base 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-four or uplevel 3.3-liter twin-turbo V6. However, on the horizon looms a larger, more potent entry-level powerplant.

According to a Hyundai source who spoke to Car and Driver, the G70 will become home to the turbocharged 2.5-liter four bound for the Hyundai Sonata N-Line. If you’re not familiar with that variant, it’s an upcoming sexed-up version of the basic Sonata — a model that’s seriously made-over for the 2020 model year.

While the G70 2.0T makes 252 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque, the Sonata N-Line mill offers greater output from a similar footprint. According to Hyundai, the 2.5T generates at least 290 hp and 310 lb-ft. (We’ll have driving impressions of the Sonata N-Line for you next week.)

It’s assumed the arrival of the new entry-level engine will coincide with the G70’s mid-cycle refresh, scheduled for the 2021 or 2022 model year. At that point, the available six-speed manual could head for the dustbin, as C&D notes only 4 percent of G70 2.0T buyers have thus far sprung for a three-pedal experience. It was nice of Genesis to offer one at all.

As Genesis awaits the arrival of its first crossover early next year, the G70 remains the brand’s best-selling model. It’s a status the G70 achieved not long after its late-2018 introduction. Spot-on styling and a comfortable price tag, coupled with respectable power, makes the G70 a serious contender in a segment long dominated by the Germans. More punch on the bottom end of the price ladder will only help the model’s appeal.

[Image: Genesis Motors]

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27 Comments on “More Base Power on the Way For Genesis G70...”


  • avatar
    thornmark

    that’s a great-looking car – better than most sedans extant

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “C&D notes only 4 percent of G70 2.0T buyers have thus far sprung for a three-pedal experience”

    Some important reasons for this: the manual costs $3050 more than the automatic, and gets worse fuel economy. And, it will have terrible trade-in value because it will be an unsellable unicorn on the dealer’s lot.

    You’d really have to love driving a stick to get one, and most people who can afford and want a Genesis are past their stick-shift days.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      >>And, it will have terrible trade-in value because it will be an unsellable unicorn on the dealer’s lot.<<

      I have read that actually isn't the case for private sales. Because they are now so rare, manuals in sports sedans can actually command more on private resale as distinct from trade-ins. I believe Bark might have written about that.

      As for EPA est, I have a 6 speed manual sedan that wildly exceeds EPA numbers – supposed to get 34 hwy and usually get 43. I believe the EPA tests are not accurate for manuals, or at least some manuals.

      I do think manual equipped cars should get a discount as an additional anti-theft device.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike Beranek

        You are correct about fuel economy. We don’t really know how exactly the test driver is operating a manual trans during an EPA test, but those of us who drive them know that how you do so can have a drastic effect of MPGs. I’ve seen a 10 MPG difference between an aggressive style and one where I keep the Rs below 3 grand and skip gears.
        MPGs are just like everything else- with a manual, YOU have maximum control over how the car performs.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      This is misleading, the manual G70 comes with standard equipment not included in the base auto trim.

  • avatar
    EX35

    How about focusing on making cars that do not completely fall apart by 40k miles, as C&D found out. Even bimmers make it to 75k before falling apart.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      C/D tested a Genesis that fell apart in 40,000 miles?

      I’d like to see that article. Link?

      • 0 avatar
        PeriSoft

        As far as I can tell, C/D has only finished one long-term Genesis test, of a G90. They had to have the sunroof glass adjusted at one point, and there was a recall? I think “fall apart” might be a bit of an exaggeration. Their long term G70 only has a few k on it.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Now C/D did test a Stinger GT that they felt aged poorly like: “hatch rattle back again” or “leather seat wearing poorly”

          So wear and tear and rattles. Mechanically it was solid.

          Genesis vehicles seem to be a little better screwed together.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I find the second-gen Genesis/first G80 to be an interesting car and occasionally look at what used examples are for sale.

            It does seem like the leather is a bit delicate, but other than that they look OK in high-res pictures.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The brakes on the Stinger do age horribly (which C/D and several other outlets have noted). Rattles seem to only be an issue on the early build 2018MY vehicles (mine hasn’t had any). I’d personally prefer cloth seats and wish the engine had more power at higher RPMs but YMMV on that stuff. Overall the Kia has held up much better than my Dodge over the same period.

            However, the Stinger is not a G70. It is honestly surprising how different the two cars feel. So I think it should be judged separately. I also believe the Genesis has improved brakes.

          • 0 avatar
            EX35

            https://backfires.caranddriver.com/forums/1963708/posts/4453854-22993952

            “If there’s anything positive coming from these experiences, it’s that none of this has cost us any money, because all the repairs were made under warranty. It’s hard to ignore the fact that no news might very well be good news for the Stinger. It’s survived a full Michigan winter without a single bent wheel”

            I legit lol’d when I read that the first time. love how their only compliment is that the rims haven’t bent yet

          • 0 avatar
            EX35

            Reminder: C&D was saying it was aging poorly at 24K miles! That’s obscene in this day in age that a car costing close to half a G-note is built with such terrible materials.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            What does “age poorly” mean for brakes? Fast pad wear? Warped rotors? Rattles?

          • 0 avatar
            EX35

            the age-poorly meant in reference to pretty much everything inside the car. C&D did note the brakes were horrid and the dealer kept having to turn and replace the rotors every few thousand miles or the car would shake like a wild banshee. Just that level of quality you expect when you pay $48K (the as tested price)

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “What does “age poorly” mean for brakes?”

            Thrumming noises, reduced feel, and vibrations felt through the steering wheel and pedal. Showed up on mine around 10K. Dealer replaced everything under warranty but unless they’ve redesigned something it’ll only be a temporary fix.

            A lot of publications have claimed “warped rotors” but from people that have looked into it more deeply, the rotors are fine and it is the pads to blame as they are prone to leaving (sometimes sizable) deposits on the rotors. Kia also put way too much emphasis on low-dust over brake feel.

            It isn’t a huge deal for me to switch over to a semi-metallic pad once the aftermarket provides it, and I also didn’t spend anywhere close to $50K on the car. But, overall it is a disappointing thing and something that doesn’t show up in test drives or “First Drives”. The rest of the car has been fine and FWIW I don’t have regrets about buying it. Especially compared to the terrible experience I had with my Charger’s quality.

            However, I again think the brakes are a Stinger-specific problem and not something afflicting the G70 or G80. In fact some Stinger owners have bought G70 pads to use on their cars.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @EX35

          OK, that’s the test I thought you were referring to. Long story short, they had a rattle in the hatchback, and it looks like the brakes are prone to warping.

          Annoying, to be sure, but I don’t see how you get from that to “completely falls apart in 40,000 miles,” though.

      • 0 avatar
        ShoogyBee

        Motor Trend’s long-term G70 already had transmission issues at under 2K miles:

        https://www.motortrend.com/cars/genesis/g70/2019/2019-genesis-g70-long-term-update-1-review/

        • 0 avatar
          EX35

          Lol. That feeling you get when C&D reminds their audience that their long term Alfa has much better reliability than their barely broken in Hyundai. Honestly, I just don’t get why ppl plunk down this much dough on a Korean car when there are so many exceptional cars out there. I guess I am just confused.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Based on the latest CR reliability rankings, the G70 is the most reliable Genesis model and the brand ranked 5th overall.

      The only model from an Asian make to make the 10 Least Reliable list was the Acura MDX.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I have to laugh at the suggestion that even modern automatics get better gas mileage than a manual transmission driven by a human.

    I average 8 mpgs better than the posted HIGHWAY mpgs on my 2016 Hyundai Elantra (that’s 45 mpgs). I cannot imagine any automatic put into that car that would beat me in mileage. I am no hypermiler, but I have eyes and a brain. I batch up shopping runs and drive the posted speed limit and use cruise control where it is effective. I do not race from any stop and I am never the first to arrive at a stop light. I am fanatical about tire pressure and adjust as temperatures go up or down with seasons and I check them weekly. Of course I am also fanatical about maintenance and my car looks and drives like brand new.

    Of course the EPA ratings will have a slushbox beating a manual because the system is gamed to run that way. I real human with intelligence can always beat an automatic transmission car. And those horrid CVTS – awful awful awful pieces of junk.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      @ cprescott

      I’ve seen ( fleetingly ) 29 MPG with my LS2, whilst lugging sixth gear on the flats with no headwind – this in a car with the aerodynamics of a school. I’m usually around 15 MPG but that’s more due to hooning and short commutes. It’s kind of fun to start in first gear, then change right to the 1:1 fourth gear with no issues. That said, it’s also fun to hammer it in first gear; change to second; and feather the throttle a bit until the grip returns…

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      Gotta disagree. I drive a manual 2016 Audi A5 and yes, I can quite easily beat the EPA fuel economy numbers on my car. And in fact,the EPA rates my manual transmission higher in fuel economy than the automatic version of the car. However, some of these newer cas with 8-, 9-, and 10-speed automatic transmissions just have too much or a gearing advantage to beat them with a manual transmission. The highway fuel economy with a 10-speed automatic can be outrageously good when driven the right way.

  • avatar
    EX35

    Reminder: New base C7 7Ms are now selling for $45K (if not less).

    https://www.macmulkin.net/VehicleDetails/new-2019-Chevrolet-Corvette-Stingray_Coupe_1LT-Nashua-NH/3502731223

  • avatar
    bd2

    The refreshed G70 (gets the new Genesis design language) is already in testing stage, presumably w/ the new 2.5T and 3.5TT motors.

    Unlike for the FWD Sonata N-Line, the 2.5T for RWD architecture will be rated at 304 HP or thereabouts.

  • avatar
    MorrisGray

    And hopefully a manual transmission!!!

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