By on December 6, 2019

Like most Americans, you probably didn’t emerge from last night’s slumber with thoughts of the Honda Ridgeline on your mind. Few do, though the oft-overlooked unibody Honda pickup remains a fairly consistent niche seller.

For the coming month, Honda wants to provide you, the buyer, with additional reasons to choose its offering over tried-and-true BOF competitors.

The headline gave it away. With year’s end looming, Honda is increasing incentives on the Ridgeline, a vehicle that first bowed in second-generation guise in mid-2016. Boosted spiffs aren’t the only way Honda plans to clear out aging inventory.

As reported by CarsDirect, the automaker plans to offer 0.9-percent financing (over a 72-month term) on certain Ridgelines, which happens to be the best finance offer on this particular vehicle the publication has seen to date.

While all Ridgelines are eligible for $2,000 in dealer cash, a new effort adds an extra $2,000 for Ridgeline Sport buyers, and $1,500 for RTL buyers. If you’re unaware, the RTL is the high-end Ridgeline. So, getting those additional discounts means springing for a truck with a higher asking price, but those are normally the hoods where extra cash lands.

Also, as CarsDirect points out, there’s no certainty your local dealer will use those extra dollars to move metal. Shop around if you’re in the market. A lease on a low-end Ridgeline RT is apparently one of the better deals to be found in December, so there’s that to consider.

The current offer ends January 6th.

Honda’s latest Ridgeline earned positive reviews upon its debut for being brawnier and more capable than one might have assumed. Since its release, monthly sales have stagnated in the high-2000 range, though 2019 has turned out to be better year than 2018. Through the end of November, Ridgeline sales are up 6.7 percent, with last month bringing a significant 36.2-percent volume gain.

With the exception of August 2019, last month was the nameplate’s best showing in the U.S. since March of 2017. Per ALG, November saw the average incentive spend per unit rise 9.4 percent, year over year — the greatest increase of any automaker.

[Image: Honda]

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32 Comments on “Honda Ups Discounts on Ridgeline — a Truck That’s Already Having a Better Year...”


  • avatar
    Carrera

    Well, as a first generation Ridgeline owner( ownership between 2009-2016), I find this current generation hideous. The first generation wasn’t a looker by any means but to me, it didn’t look like an El Camino. The current generation feels tighter in the back seat and the rear doors don’t swing as wide as the previous generation. Of course, the prices have gotten crazy when compared to the first generation. I really enjoyed my Ridgeline and it was unstoppable in the snow because it was a FWD based vehicle with on demand AWD. Never had to add bags of sand in the bed. The gas mileage was horrid and that’s what made me sell it at 120,000 miles although the truck was in great shape ( well, timing belt was due and needed tires). On average, driving 70-75 mph on the hwy the best I could get was 17 mpg. The best I ever got ( empty, downhill, no AC) was 19,5 mpg. To get 17 mpg out of a V6 unibody truck isn’t good at all. I understand that the new one gets better fuel consumption but those looks…

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      That is terrible mileage. My 2WD V8 Dakota Quad Cab gets 17 on the highway unloaded. Dodge claims it should get 19 but I would have to drive like 55 MPH to manage that.

    • 0 avatar
      Mackey

      Sounds to me like your right foot weighs more than it should, you only drove in town, or you had some other problem with that truck. Admittedly ive never owned a gen 1 Ridgeline, but my Gen 2 AWD gets fantastic gas mileage. Just finished a winter highway trip averaging 26mpgs over 500 miles. Even over several thousand miles, my combined average of city and highway is around 23 mpg.

      I agree that the front styling is on the soft side, but I also get who they were targeting- those who are comfortable enough to shop based on a realistic balance of capability versus need,as opposed to someone more likely to want to use their truck as a rolling billboard for their manhood. I grew up with trucks- 8′ regular cab REAL trucks- it’s hard sometimes to not be able to customize this as much as I’d like, or see them all look like various styles of ‘soft’, but I also know that I dont have to prove anything, and if I did, it eould be that I got the best truck for my needs. And yes, it is a truck. It has a cargo bed behind a cab, and that bed is wider and more usable than most any other midsize truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Mackey, the first generations were all AWD so I would assume 2-300lbs heavier than yours. Also they had only a 5 speed automatic as opposed to yours. Let’s not forget also, it isn’t as aerodynamic as 2nd generation. I don’t have a heavy food. My commute distance in Canada consisted of 25 miles hwy driving with very little in town drive but it was somewhat hilly. Later on when I moved back home to Florida, my commute was 53 miles, exclusivity hwy drive. In Florida, I was fueling every 3 days at $46-50/tank. I loved the truck but that wasn’t sustainable.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    Every time I see the 2gen Ridge, I am reminded of the TFL episode where they just drove some trucks on back roads of California and Nevada. Every truck there blew shocks, even Tacoma, every one except the Ridgeline that is. For a sissy truck with a fragile Honda 6sp, it sure looks surprisingly indestructible.

    • 0 avatar
      agroal

      Apparently you haven’t bothered to research how the frames are failing from towing.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      That wasn’t TFL, that was Edmunds. IMO it was more instructive as a comparison of IRS vs solid rear axles and a study in the effect of unsprung mass. The Titan and Tacoma have beefy solid axles bouncing up and down, the Honda has a much lighter mass (short control arms and CV axles going to knuckles).

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Lol, you said truck.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I like the Ridgeline…. except that front end ruins the entire car.

    It is wimpy and girly and the headlights look wimpy and the fog lights look like they’re from 1995.

    Squaring off the front end a bit would probably fix this. It just looks wimpy. Not something a “truck” should have style-wise. It definitely looks like the mom mobile Pilot up front.

    Folks of a buddy of mine just got one. He agrees completely. Said he’d never buy it because of that front style. And he drives an older Tucson. So he knows frumpy. His other complaint is cheap interior bits and mismatched panels.

    But functionally and the way it drives it’s a pretty useful car.

    I honestly would probably by any other truck before a Ridgeline however.

    Honda fix that styling.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      The corporate front end on all current Hondas is pretty tragic. The Accord sort of pulls it off. I’ve heard the shapes are there because Honda designed its Honda Sensing kit around certain angles and radar characteristics; that’s allegedly why they all look remarkably similar.

      This vehicle offers about as much capability as I would ever need: hauling bulky, but not heavy things (couches, televisions). I’d never buy one though since I can rent the 3 times a year it might be necessary to haul something bigger than can fit in a CX-5.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “It is wimpy and girly …”

      That’s because the Ridge is a girly-truck, wildly popular with the ladies in my region who like comfort and often seen with a one-horse trailer behind it and a bed full of hay bales and/or feed.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      I quite like the new Ridgeline front. But then again, I like girls….

    • 0 avatar
      agroal

      “Honda fix that styling.” By that you must mean: “Honda make a pickup truck.” This ungainly, ridiculous looking abortion is a minivan with an open trunk out back. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    What’s new with the 2020 Ridgeline?

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Im a big fan of the gen2 ridgeline. The problem though is discounted full size trucks. For the price of a ridgeline RTL AWD i could get a crew cab ram 1500 v6.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      For the price of a Ridgeline AWD, you could get a Hemi Big Horn for sure. The first generation wasn’t that pricy, plus it came with AWD standard.

    • 0 avatar
      agroal

      You’re a big fan of the gen2 Ridgeline? That makes…. one of you. Honda’s silly experiment in pickup trucks is an answer to a question that nobody asked.

      • 0 avatar
        3800FAN

        Ok you hate the ridgeline…dont buy one. Be happy a company is willing to roll the dice and invest serious capital in something different. Otherwise thered be no innovation nothing new.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      It’s true, but then it’s a Ram… The crew cab is longer and all that.

      • 0 avatar
        teddyc73

        @ Pete Zaitcev Yeah, you’re right, it is a Ram. They are good trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I saw my first 2019 Ram 1500 Rebel at Umansky Honda-CDJR in Charlottesville. I thought it was a Ridgeline. Incidentally, if you need a reason to steer clear of the City of Hate, Umansky Subaru has its own huge building while Honda, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep and Ram share a showroom.

        A friend has a 2nd generation Ridgeline, but he’s one of those soft guys who owns and runs multiple pawn and gun shops in the hood while raising a family. It replaced an F150 and he likes it.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    The first gen was actually downright cheap depending on when you bought it. When gas hit $4 a gallon, you can buy a mid level Ridgeline for $23k. The truck had a sticker of $31k.

    If you kept it to today and only put say 100k miles on it, you could sell that unit for $8-10k no problem. Not bad on depreciation!

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Yes, they were cheap and AWD was standard. I bought mine used when it was 18 months old, had 9,000 miles and had about $ 2000 in accessories like BBack semi-rigid foldable bed cover, OEM roof rack, OEM ski accessories and non OEM running boards for 21,500. I thought it was a decent price. Right now, a nice clean first generation 2014 loaded ( leather, NAVI) with low miles like under 30,000 is about $25,000 and it isn’t that far removed from reality since I just checked it against black book NADA.

  • avatar
    agroal

    Both generations of these FWD minivans with optional 4WD and an open trunk out back are simply ungainly looking. The fact that the designers actually took the trouble to add an artificial cut line aft of the rear doors to simulate a separate bed says poser. I can’t ever recall seeing one with anything but air being hauled in their ‘beds.’

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    Based on some of the comments above, I think the headline for this article should be amended to:

    Honda Ridgeline Triggers Emasculation Fears Among the B&B

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    $#!+box

  • avatar
    FAS

    my neighbor loved his Gen2, but traded it in on a Tacoma after the treatment he got when he went back to the dealer after a trip to the local car wash…..Both front fenders suffered quite a bit of significant damage (I saw it, it was crazy) from being thin I guess..any gen 2 owners had the same experience?

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