By on December 3, 2019

With a brace of sedans not arriving until later in the year, Cadillac’s big attention-getter last January was a gas-free, unnamed crossover… as well as a conventional one with little charisma in the tank.

The concept EV heralded an electrified product surge from General Motors as well as the Cadillac brand, but in the 10 months since its reveal, little has been heard of the future model. Expect to hear a lot more in the New Year, as the vehicle’s debut is barely more than a year away. It’s the first of many fingers-crossed products from GM.

Speaking to The Detroit Bureau, Rick Spina, GM’s vice president of electric and autonomous vehicle programs, claims the model will appear in a little over a year. While that would normally point to a debut at the Detroit Auto Show, organizers behind that even have left winter in the dust, preferring instead on a June date. Regardless, expect to see the Caddy show itself in early 2021. Sales should commence later that year.

Just in time, it seems, to do battle against a Lincoln crossover that borrows the in-house EV platform found beneath the Ford Mustang Mach-E. Like whatever Lincoln comes up with, the Cadillac model will boast two rows of seating and a premium — but athletic — persona. Other GM models bound for the platform will carry their own personality. And there will be a number of them, Spina claims.

“A fairly large chunk of our products in the next three to seven years will be electric vehicles,” Spina said. “GM is traditionally a full-line company, so we’re going to compete everywhere.”

Image: GM

There’s two things behind the automaker’s sudden EV product push. First, the development of a dedicated EV platform, which Spina says “will get us more compelling products than platforms that have to be flexible” — meaning capable of accomodating gas, hybrid, plug-in, and BEV powertrains. The second thing is falling costs for battery packs, which traditionally make up the biggest single expense for an EV (resulting in an inflated sticker price).

GM claims it’s spending less than $150 a kilowatt-hour on battery packs, which is a small fraction (15 percent) of the expense when the Chevrolet Volt launched at the beginning of the decade. Battery costs are projected to fall further in the years ahead, opening the door to widespread consumer acceptance — and profitability.

Still, Spina holds out hope for “the holy grail of EVs” — a cheaper battery that’s far more energy dense, and thus less bulky.

While the recent UAW contract revealed GM’s plans for a series of large EVs bound for its Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant, 2019 saw more EV teasing than just the Caddy concept. Back in March, CEO Mary Barra announced $300 in funding for the underutilized Orion Assembly, home to the Chevrolet Bolt and destined-for-death Sonic. The cash will pave the way for a future Chevrolet crossover built on second-generation Bolt architecture. A few weeks after the announcement, GM filed a trademark application for the “Bolt EUV” name.

Many question the public’s willingness to get on board with GM’s (or any other mainstream automaker’s) green plan, but Spina seems optimistic. Despite EVs making up just 1.9 percent of U.S. new vehicle sales in the past quarter, the exec feels that, by mid-decade, the tide will turn, especially after the technology filters down to low-end, low-cost products.

[Image: General Motors]

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35 Comments on “Awaiting the Flood: Cadillac’s First EV Draws Closer...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Holiday travel by EV looks awesome. I’m sure its better in places where they don’t have as much Tesla infrastructure as California though.

    https://www.facebook.com/shanon.stellini/videos/10221275983794800/

    There seems to be a disinformation campaign to create the impression that the lines were only 15 cars and 40 minutes deep, but the reality was obviously much worse. For some reason, the only media to pick up this video is Infowars. Is anyone brainwashed enough to dismiss it as fake?

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      Wait till’ the wind starts blowing.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      the only brainwashed here are those who get their “news” from InfoWars.

      • 0 avatar
        CaddyDaddy

        the only brainwashed here are those who get their “news” from NPR. There fixed it for you.

        • 0 avatar
          Nick_515

          Just googled InfoWars. Is this a joke?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          you fixed nothing. #1 I didn’t posit NPR as an alternative, and #2 even so I’d put more stock in them than I would a shrieking hysterical demagogue who makes a living selling horsesh*t “male virility” supplements to a paranoid audience who apparently thinks masculinity is something you can buy in a little bottle.

          • 0 avatar
            CaddyDaddy

            JIMz I don’t buy Infowars products. But hey, at least AJ is not some leach who gets his funding from stolen money. Just like Tesla and all EV’s, in reality just schemes to rob the taxpayer. …. and Tesla like .gov, still lose money / deeper in debt after all the fake funding and subsidies.

            On another note, TFL Truck is doing great work with real world testing with their Model X. Showing it to be worthless for towing, or even mild off roading. EV’s are worthless for road trips, deep snow and turn into torches when going across small streams.

            In the end: EV’s will be relegated to delivery / in town service trucks, virtue signalers, and daily drives in the CA coastal regions.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “But hey, at least AJ is not some leach who gets his funding from stolen money.”

            I’d say hawking bulls**t products and lying to people is effectively doing just that.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Has anything InfoWars put out ever not been fake? This is the guy who said Sandy Hook was a false flag operation and deservedly got his pants sued off by the grieving parents.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “For some reason, the only media to pick up this video is Infowars. Is anyone brainwashed enough to dismiss it as fake?”

      Asked and answered. When ABC news runs Kentucky gun show footage to create an anti-Trump narrative about the Kurds, who is more trust worthy than Infowars? And I’m not saying Infowars is trustworthy, but if you can’t look at source material and determine what is true than you are a defenseless sheep being led to slaughter.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “For some reason, the only media to pick up this video is Infowars. Is anyone brainwashed enough to dismiss it as fake?”

      Anything involving Infowars is a red flag suggesting that whatever you’re reading is not valid.

      You must corroborate news with other sources, just like when you’re flying partial panel IFR.

      You’ve just stated that you cannot cross reference a news article you found on a known-faulty site.

      Based on what you just told me, your article is completely invalid!

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I saw the video posted on facebook, linked to the woman who filmed it. I looked to see if it was picked up by any of the news outlets spreading disinformation about the extent of Thanksgiving travel disruption experienced by Tesla drivers. They used other videos shot in the day when most people were having dinner instead of the night time disaster of people trying to get home. Infowars linked to the night video on facebook. You dismissed it because “Infowars equals red flag in my coding.” You’ve been defeated as a sentient being.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Cadillac’s SECOND EV draws closer.

    “And there will be a number of them, Spina claims.”

    A number of ELRs await you.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      10s of Cadillac EVs will be sold!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The ELR was a disaster because Cadillac didn’t understand where the ELR fit on the market.

      There was some wishful thinking about their brand being strong enough to pull in Veblen pricing.

      Anyone who wanted an EV had a choice: for the same money, they could buy a started up Chevy Volt without back doors, OR they could go all in and get Tesla Model (with a full EV drivetrain). Tesla’s value proposition was just much better for the same money.

      If GM had priced the ELR as if it were a sporty trim of the Chevy Volt, they would have sold a lot more of them.

      This isn’t the first time GM Marketing has totally misunderstood the green car market. They spent a decade assuming green car hippies couldn’t read the MPG numbers on the window sticker… And with the ELR, they assumed we couldn’t read the price tag either.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Eugh. Cadillac is nothing and somehow people still buy into their paper-thin veneer. That looks exactly like the Nissan concept that came out the week prior to its debut, and they both look like that hunday hydrogen thing. I wish Cadillac would have kept some distinction and launched the design language of the Ciel instead of becoming as unforgivably generic as they are now.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      They will do the exact opposite of what is best for the marque if they think it will make them a quick buck and its been that way for decades. What I don’t understand is, who keeps buying this sh!t?

      • 0 avatar
        Greg Hamilton

        Two types of people. Old people who remember what Cadillac used to be and poor old people, because they bought one and now it broke down.

        • 0 avatar
          Greg Hamilton

          And I will admit to being both. I purchased an SRX (even DeadWeight thought it wasn’t a bad car. I remember his Aunt had bought one) because my father thought Cadillac was a great car. Soon after I bought it many things started going wrong. I think I brought it into the dealer six times (each time for a different problem) before I sold it. The principle at my daughters school had one too. She brought it to the dealer multiple times because various alarms and buzzers were going off. She was told, “They all do that.” My father was very disappointed. He wanted Cadillac to return to it former glory. Now I drive a Toyota.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Whatever it is, it can’t be worse than those stupid CUVs they’re making now.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    Success is assured if $300 is allocated for Orion Assembly. GM is finally getting serious about EVs.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It’s a bit depressing to see everyone but Audi rush to copy the Tesla Model Y. I agree that way more electric CUVs are needed yesterday for EVs to succeed, but I don’t think every last one needs to be low, sporty, and cramped inside.

    Audi at least has a different sort of product with the e-Tron, but it’s overpriced by $10k.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    “…so, we’re going to compete everywhere.”

    And win nowhere.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Will Cadillac electric drive motors have unique windings (thicker wire, upgraded insulation, etc.) or will they just pawn off the Chevrolet stuff as premium? :-)

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Pawn off? That’s a good one. Surely you meant palm off – that’s the huckster’s trick at a carnival. Show the little boys and girls a big balloon, and when you buy yours, it’s a quarter the size of the one the huckster waved about. All Cadillacs bar a few they’re canning outright as non-sellers seem to be exactly that. Chevies with a huckster selling them.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        “Surely you meant…” Are we so sure? This one doesn’t seem to be a full-blown malapropism. According to this, mine is the more-frequently-used collocation these days (while that’s no defense):
        https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/pawn-off-vs-palm-off-usage

        But now that we have that unsettled, do you have any original thoughts of your own? (It adds to the depth of the site.)

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Cadillac should have been the first GM brand to introduce an EV.

      Cadillac (or Buick) could have been GM’s high tech brand.

      We wouldn’t be asking this question if GM realized that electric cars are highly desirable, for those of us who want one. I’ll gladly pay extra for an EV, but I won’t pay extra for a badge whose brand equity was harvested during my grandfather’s time.

      But Chevy is GM’s high tech brand, so why are they bothering us about Cadillac?

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        GM’s first EV was an experiment that helped develop the EVs around today. There was nothing luxurious about it. The range was short, the comfort was indifferent at best, and it wasn’t powerful. They didn’t want to tarnish any of their brands with it. I love bashing GM and EVs, but they did pioneering work that EV proponents should acknowledge. I suppose you don’t get to be an EV proponent by knowing anything.

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