By on December 11, 2019

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Eighty-five years after its debut, the Chevrolet Suburban is still looking to conquer new lands. This time around, that seized territory lies between the front and rear bumper of the vehicle, and that goes double for its shorter body-on-frame sibling, the Tahoe.

Introduced Tuesday night in the birthplace of it all, Detroit, the 2021 Tahoe and Suburban mark the greatest leap forward in the models’ lineage to date. There’s acres more room, but the big-ticket items lie under the hood and within the rear wheel wells.

Yes, General Motors’ full-size SUVs break with tradition and move to an independent rear suspension for 2021. Gone is the solid truck axle; in its place, a multilink setup that can be optioned with Magnetic Ride Control or a class-exclusive, height-adjustable air suspension that affords drivers four inches of up-and-down adjustment.

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Greeting buyers with an arguably terrifying face lifted, in part, from the questionably revamped Silverado 1500, the Tahoe and Suburban retain their boxy exterior proportions, as it turns out boxes are quite spacious inside. These ones are, too — considerably more so than the outgoing generation.

Dimension-wise, the re-platformed Tahoe sees the biggest gain in territory. Wheelbase grows 4.9 inches and overall length expands 6.7 inches, with the newfound stretch benefitting rear-seat passengers the most. Second-row passengers gain three inches of legroom; third-row passengers can now be adults thanks to a 10.1-inch boost in lower extremity acreage. Behind that seat, cargo volume expands to 25.5 cubic feet — a gain of 10.2 cubes.

Ray Ban-clad security details will appreciate the additional room.

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With less room to expand outward, the Suburban’s dimensions see less change, but it’s not insignificant. While overall length grows just 1.3 inches, wheelbase it up 4.1 inches. Legroom for second- and third-row passengers increases 2.3 and 2.2 inches, respectively, and rear cargo volume rises 1.8 cubic feet to a grand total of 41.1 cubes. Aiding those long-ignored third-row passengers are second-row seats that offer 10 inches of back-and-forth travel.

With seats folded down, available cargo room in the Tahoe and Suburban grows 28.2 and 23 cubic feet apiece.

That’s the size news; up front, two big changes are afoot. For one, all powerplants will pair with a 10-speed automatic (previous Tahoes and Suburbans only paired that unit with the uplevel 6.2-liter; now, it’s available on the base 5.3-liter). Power for both Dynamic Fuel Management-equipped engines remains the same, though buyers will now be able to option their SUV with GM’s 3.0-liter inline-six diesel.

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In the Silverado, GM’s new oil-burner returns 33 mpg highway and 27 mpg combined in rear-drive guise, so figure something close to that when the EPA gets around to testing these things.

Elsewhere on the pair, standard LED lamps appear fore and aft, no doubt helping the models’ future standing with the IIHS. Flanking the no-doubt-polarizing grille appears to be air curtain front fenders that should reduce buffeting (and drag) around the front wheel wells. Grille shutters further aid this lengthy box’s aerodynamics.

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Trim-wise, the Suburban and Tahoe double up on choice. For 2021, the range starts at LS and moves up through LT, Z71 (a bonafide trim now), RST, Premier, and top-flight High Country. As with the 1500 and Heavy Duty Silverados, High Country offers the most appealing iteration of Chevy’s now-corporate grille. The 6.2-liter is standard on all but the topmost trim; interestingly, the 3.0L Duramax is optional on all but the Z71. (Nary of a mention of that four-cylinder GM won’t call a four-cylinder, but the dropping of the unpopular four-banger variant of the Traverse foreshadowed the 2.7-liter’s exclusion from these models’ powerplant list.)

As for those trick suspensions, the road surface-monitoring Magnetic Ride Control is standard kit on Premier and High Country, available on Z71. Those latter two trim are also available with the Air Ride Adaptive Suspension GM would love buyers to shell out for. Wheel sizes starts at 18 inches for LS and LT, moving through 20-inches for the RST and Z71, up to 22-inch hoops for the RST and High Country. Trim-specific grille treatments will help differentiate the models when spotted out in the wild.

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Inside, all Tahoe and Suburban buyers are greeted with a 10-inch infotainment screen, with a 4.2-inch driver information center appearing in the gauge cluster for LS, LT, RST, and Z71 customers. Premier and High Country buyers see an 8-inch info display. The uppermost trim also gets a 15-inch (diagonal) head-up display that’s available on the Premier.

As for backseat passengers, they won’t have to use their imagination to pass the time, so long as the buyer opted for dual 12.6-inch LCD touchscreens — each one programmable by passengers on that side of the vehicle, regardless of seat. A Wi-Fi hotspot and standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity should lessen the boredom, regardless of where you’re sitting.

As for price, that’ll have to wait until closer to the Tahoe and Suburban’s summer 2020 release date.

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[Images: General Motors]

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77 Comments on “2021 Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe: America, Your Ride Awaits...”


  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Let the money printing commence!

    Honestly, these look fantastic.

    Never a GM guy but they know how to do this kind of vehicle and I suspect they hit the nail on the head here. Lord knows if they didn’t cost such a pretty penny and I had more pennies I’d be in a Tahoe today. And I think I like even more what I see here.

    Though I must admit I actually like the new front end on the Silverado.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      GM is not holding back here – this is sincerely (on their part) the best work they are capable of. I think I understand what they are doing for the most part, although I don’t agree with all of it.

      I am genuinely curious to see how a short driver deals with the hood height, cowl height and the ginormous dash bulge over the instrument cluster. Maybe the power driver seat moves up 12 inches? Otherwise we might need to exercise additional caution in the school pick-up lane.

      Well done on the additional legroom and the sliding second row.

      Also curious to see what the view of the outside world is from the third row of a Tahoe and from the third row of a Suburban (from here, it looks like the view out will be mostly C-pillar).

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Sweet,

  • avatar
    thegamper

    These do look pretty decent I must say. I saw some pics of the Z71 version for which GM has cut out the middle man and d’bagged it up for you right from the showroom floor. Think the Z71 would be a hot seller as that seems to appeal to many buyers but for that hideous grill.

    You also have to wonder if we are approaching the point where these things exceed the dimensions to fit in a single stall garage. Think that is the only thing that will stop the perpetual bloat of the truck segment.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Current Tahoes/Suburbans and their GM twins (and full size pickups from any brand) often can’t fit in single stall garages already. That doesn’t stop people from buying them-they just park them in the driveway.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The minimum single-car garage is 12X22 feet. If yours is 197 inches deep or some weird number, it’s substandard and not actual code.

        Standard garage sizes are always even feet, divisible by 2, like 14X24, 16X22, etc. Yeah, most fullsize pickups/SUVs live their lives outside, but it’s not that they don’t fit in the garage.

        It’s not clear why anyone would think automakers aren’t extremely aware of garage sizes, parking spaces, etc.

        • 0 avatar

          Said it before, will say it again. States can adopt or not adopt universal codes. Then some states and even local authorities can modify them. And in some places they don’t really apply at all. Where I live in the North east the majority of the housing stock predates modern codes. So you can say that but my guess would be that a significant percentage of garages don’t meet the standard. Of all my relatives I can think of only one house where the house could fit a full size crew cab 6′ bed. And that one they hid to tot ell the builder to make it oversized.

          As far as automakers they are concerned with what their customers buy not where it fits. Despite cold winters here in the NE the majority of people I know leave their cars out of the garage most of the time and as such not really an important factor at all.

  • avatar
    Deontologist

    Mary Barra for jail 2020

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    I like it, but I haven’t driven or priced one yet.

    So, what do we know?

    Fixed are years of GM-denial that Ford’s independent rear suspension is the proper way to go. Watch GM bray like donkeys over this “new feature.”

    Fixed (maybe) is the PREVIOUS REDUCTION of cargo space and insanely tall load floor of the outgoing model.

    Fixed is the lack of diesel engine availability on many trims.

    Probably not fixed is the painful BOOM-BOOM-BOOM noise most GM product have over small bumps and road imperfections (thank the GM incompetents to let that continue for decades).

    Now if I want to buy one, all I have to do is endure the:

    – Engine auto-shutoff (which is a deal killer).
    – 2+ years of me finding and fixing bugs from the “customer-last” GM culture. (Hmm: Frame shake. Piston slap. Transfer cases that drill holes in themselves. Premature frame rust, and rocker/fender rust. Steering shaft rattle. … )
    – Overly busy and hugely expensive GM dealers, a result of cutting many community-centric, independent GM dealers in the bankruptcy—which was just an executive-clown scapegoat smokescreen. I do look forward to driving a Spark or Trax when the Suburban is in service a week—NOT.
    – Trick suspension? Like trick you out of your money? When does it break? Can the dealer find the problem? Will the dealer say “they all do that?”
    – 10” infotainment screen? What does that cost, noting a 10” tablet is $200. I prefer real controls, as do the Military fighter pilots.

    Really: GM is still second by two years in the significant improvements in Ford’s latest Expedition.

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      For someone who hasn’t driven or even seen one yet, you seem to know an awful lot about them.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        I own a Suburban, have followed them closely, I have the Internet, and many GM neighbors.

        • 0 avatar
          don1967

          Detroit-X, do you really think you’re the only person in the world who has a GM truck, an internet connection, and neighbours?

          The only thing that makes your opinion truly unique is which evidence was used to build it, and which evidence was ignored to protect it.

          It’s called confirmation bias, and you know you’ve got it bad when you use “premature frame rust” and “expensive dealers” as excuses for avoiding GM trucks specifically. These complaints are as common among truck owners as farts at a chili cookoff.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-X

            At the cook-off, our psychimicholigal term we call it personal opinion based on personal experience. My frame is still rusted, my time was still wasted, my money sent elsewhere, the dealer still a turd, unnecessary disappointment, etc. But thanks for the tip, doctor.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I have a 08′ suburban, 05′ Vette’, and now a 17′ Volt. What is this boom-boom-boom nonsense you speak of?Please list in order the GM vehicles, year make and model (we will have to trust your honesty here) you have owned as I am suspicious that you rented one GM vehicle once that made a noise when it hit a pot hole.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        Not all have it. Many have it. (A whole story on that.)
        Cold is worse.
        Poor road states are worse.
        People who have good hearing, hear it worse.
        People who are not oblivious to such things have it worse.

        If you possess a few of the worst case of all the above, and still do not think it is a factor then, sir: you have GM management potential!

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Your complaints would make more sense if most of them didn’t apply to the Expedition as well:

      -Standard stop start
      -Quality complaints
      -Busy/expensive dealers
      -Ecosport loaners
      -8″ touchscreen

      Plus these offer a V8 or diesel (if you’re into that sort of thing) which can’t be bought in the Ford for any price.

    • 0 avatar
      Spartan

      The booming, or buffeting as it’s formally named, is indeed a real thing. However, it is a lot more prevalent in the LWB than the SWB vehicles.

      We owned a 2016 Yukon XL Denali. Our roof was re-done twice. After the second time, we said forget it and bought a 2018 Escalade. No more booming or buffeting.

      At any rate, I like the new models but we’ll wait before upgrading to the new Escalade. I refuse to be an early adopter and deal with the inevitable first model year problems.

  • avatar
    NoID

    it’s not pictured in this article, but the Z71 they showed reminds me of those jacked-up mobility minivans.

  • avatar
    PM300

    I like this a lot and the Duramax seems especially appealing; however, unless there is a drastic price drop (lol yeah right), I could not ever see myself paying the $15k premium for one of these over the equivalent loaded GM truck version unless I had 4+ kids to tote around.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    “The 6.2-liter is standard on all but the topmost trim”

    Ok that is confusing. So the 5.3 liter is standard on the most expensive model but the bigger engine is standard on the rest? I really hope this is a hit and puts some pressure on the ridiculous prices ford puts on the expedition and navigator. I want one of those for the aluminum body (live in the salt belt) but I would much prefer a pushrod v8 over the 5.0 v8 or ecoboost v6.

  • avatar
    TimK

    Bigger interiors — the wide rides need a wider ride. A bigger “infotainment” monolith, greaaat. The first thing I do with a rentals these days is find the menu that blanks the damned thing. GM will sell a butt load of these.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The big news is the Tahoe. Yes, it was always wide, but second and third-row space was tight. Now that they’ve removed the solid rear axle (which, I’m sure, less than 10% of the target audience noticed or needed) in favor of independent rear suspension and extended the wheelbase…it finally looks like it’s worth it’s large dimensions.

    Other than that, I do like the interior/exterior styling on these, with the exception of the Z71 (which is apparently a bona-fide trim now). GM placed the push-button transmission buttons smartly, too—although I’m sure folks will lament the loss of the column shifter.

    And the diesel I6…that should be an interesting proposition. I expect it will retail somewhere between the standard 5.3 and premium 6.2-liter gas V8 engines, although likely much closer to the 6.2.

    That said, we’re getting into some expensive territory here for future maintenance, and these cars will last long enough to have that play out on the road. I would definitely skip the diesel, and the air ride. Probably an LT with some options would be the perfect balance.

    Overall, I’m impressed. GM didn’t rest on their laurels, and they could have.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Nailed it Kyree.

      I think the take rate for the Tahoe will increase dramatically over the Suburban. The fix for the rear seats, plus the 30% more space behind the 3rd row seals the deal. Most don’t need the cavernous space behind the 3rd row in the Suburban, but the current Tahoe gets a bit tight with the 3rd row set up.

      The air suspension just seems to be a problem looking for a place to happen, especially in cold climates. I would take a pass. Load mine with the 6.2 and Z71 to eliminate the fake chrome that gets pitted by Mag-Chloride.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      I don’t think resting on their laurels was really an option. Ram looms large in their rear view mirror and has embarrassed them with superior cabins and IRS. Ford has embarrassed them with aluminum, to the point where GM made that awkward attempt to steal their thunder with the fake carbon fiber beds (actually, as I understand it, ordinary composite with some carbon fiber bits sprinkled into it). The public noticed the crappy look, compromised space and quality problems, and the money they’ve had to throw on the hood had to have been God’s way of getting their attention that they were finally running out of mulligans.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “The big news is the Tahoe. Yes, it was always wide, but second and third-row space was tight. Now that they’ve removed the solid rear axle (which, I’m sure, less than 10% of the target audience noticed or needed) in favor of independent rear suspension and extended the wheelbase…it finally looks like it’s worth it’s large dimensions.”

      Kyree – As the owner of a 2007 ‘Hoe you’re dead on. The room between the front seats and 2nd row buckets is surprisingly tight. Fine for me as 99% of the time my kids are riding back. Deciding to extend the wheelbase on the new Tahoe was a smart move on GM’s part.

      My ‘Hoe has been pretty relegated to nothing but towing duty, so I like the solid rear axle for that. Regardless I still agree with GM’s decision to move to an IRS. As long as it has tow ratings comparable to the previous generations it wouldn’t stop me from buying another one.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “And the diesel I6…that should be an interesting proposition.”

      Here in MN & WI, the snowmobilers that head out west every winter in tow with their fancy enclosed trailers will be all over that diesel option. Trust me on that.

  • avatar
    Mnemic

    Great job GM, can’t wait to see the Denali. $100K SUV though….

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The Escalade version of these will be competing against Range Rovers that can top $200k. Finally it will have a suspension that at least has the potential to ride well enough to compete.

      • 0 avatar
        NeilM

        “The Escalade version of these will be competing against Range Rovers that can top $200k.”

        I didn’t think that could possibly be, but I managed to get a Range Rover up to $248,490 on the online build-your-own, and still left a few boxes unchecked. Mind you, that did include a $23,460 two-tone paint job, but who wants to skimp on the finer things, right?

  • avatar
    Jon

    I hope my wife doesn’t see this.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Mine has indicated that a standard length Yukon in SLE or SLT trim will be fine. No Denali necessary. But it’s her money and her car payment so when she’s ready in a few years that’s her business.

      Fortunately by then this platform will be a known quantity.

      I’m happy about the 10 speed being standard across the board so GM can stop being cheap SOBs and making you pay up to get more than 6-8 speeds.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Yuck. I was already resigned to the ugly front end from the trucks but that busy C-pillar area on the SWB makes it look like a Traverse. The big fake chrome piece there on the LWB isn’t appealing either.

    Tahoe is a brand in itself and styling them after their shitty Chinese crossovers diminishes it. It doesn’t say VIP inside anymore. It says Real People(tm).

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    “In the Silverado, GM’s new oil-burner returns 33 mpg highway and 27 mpg combined in rear-drive guise, so figure something close to that when the EPA gets around to testing these things.”

    How did this verbiage get in here? Since when does anyone list EPA mileage figures for highway and COMBINED? It’s almost like it was part of a press release where they wanted to trick the reader into assuming they were receiving the mileage numbers in the usual combination of highway and city. I’ve only ever seen combined mileage listed in the company of both of the tested numbers.

    As it was written, the headaches of current diesel ownership almost seem worthwhile. 27 MPG city would at least prompt me to crunch the numbers for fuel cost per mile so I could determine what might be banked for the inevitable several hundred dollar oil changes.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      ToddAtlas, completely agree on the “highway” and “combined” stunt. I read that one three times. Guessing the city figure is 22. Shame on TTAC for being a press release outlet on this aspect, per its New Normal.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    It’s not bad but that chrome strip on the liftgate is unforgivable. It matches nothing, flows with nothing, and shouldn’t be there at all.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    If the diesel engine turns out to be free of gremlins ( engine is an unknown entity at this time) this truck could be without equal. A behemoth like this getting 30 mpg on the hwy?? Wow.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    What a pile of excrement, the IRS makes this as useless as the Traverse. GM has effectively killed the full-size SUV market by denying the fact that consumers demand the solid rear axle in their truck based SUV. Barra needs to go.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Not to be bomb throwing but I predict sales go UP.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I’m willing to take that bet, after an initial increase they will fall off a cliff, like every other competitor on the market that has done this exact thing with the same expected market response. GM is Not above that.

        There’s only so many people willing to pay 70k for a truck based vanity product that is incapable of work.

        • 0 avatar
          Carrera

          Work? C’mon Hummer. You and I know where the work will take place. In the loop waiting for kids at the local elementary school and at the mall in front of Victoria’s Secret store.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Okay so some people in large cities will buy these and not work them. That does not account for the rest of the country. Out of everyone on this website I would bet money I have bought more GM SUVs than anyone else here, all BOF. I know what I need in these vehicles, and minivan ride quality is dead last on that list.

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Hummer, that hasn’t happened with Ram pickups. Sales just go up and up. Face the reality that most SUV AND pickup buyers are poseurs who don’t haul anything heavier than groceries over anything more rugged than potholes.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ Hummer, that hasn’t happened with Ram pickups. Sales just go up and up. Face the reality that most SUV AND pickup buyers are poseurs who don’t haul anything heavier than groceries over anything more rugged than potholes.”

            Ram pickups have a solid rear axle, if anything they support my point based on the accolades they have been given for ride comfort. I have no idea what point your trying to make.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I don’t think many soccer moms even know what a live axle is. But they will appreciate the lower load height.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I appreciated the low load height on my GMT800 and parents 1987 Suburban – both with solid axles.

        Poor engineering of the GMT900 and K2XX does not forgive the loss of the solid rear.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      These things are going to print money for GM yet Barra has to go?

      You do realize that the percentage of people that care AT ALL about the rear suspension design is so amazingly small that it’s nearly impossible to measure?

      Has IRS hurt ANY of the SUVs sold today? The answer is no because people are buying SUVs like they are crack.

      GM was smart in sticking with SRA for as long as they did because it kept costs down and margins up. Also, the only competition was the Expedition which prior to the recent redesign was laughably bad. New one is slightly better but GM just dug the Expedition and MKexpeditions grave and threw them in it.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Don’t bother, the guy has gone on record as saying a Suburban without a solid rear axle is a sign of impending doom for America. Not kidding about that.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        “ Has IRS hurt ANY of the SUVs sold today? The answer is no because people are buying SUVs like they are crack.”

        The number of SUVs for sale on the market is lower today than it has ever been, so explain to me where this crack pot statement came from please.

        Solid axle GM is still kicking Fords rear even with the redesign, why? The solid rear axle.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    Noted in other internet press articles is a whopping 5.3 inch lower load floor?!

    This is a BIG deal for me.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Test.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Sure, these are more technically advanced, but with the front styling they’ve also doubled (okay, tripled if you include the Silverado HD) down on ugly.

    The IRS design is completely different from what Ford uses on the Expedition, so I wonder what advantages GM see with this design over Ford’s? Less camber change? Built in toe-in/toe-out to improve handling and directional stability?

    The thing that keeps me away from GM products is the cheap parts and Chinesium content.

    Speaking of Chinesium, where’s DeadWeight?

    Also, I had to re-type this comment because it did’t take the first time. Technically speaking, this place is turning into Autoblog.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Looks like a Ford wearing a Silverado mask. The interior also looks like it is trying very hard to mimic Lincoln. Glad they are keeping the V8 around although for the anticipated asking prices the 6.2L should really be standard.

    I’d think that losing the SRA would be bad but everyone has been saying these already are only bought to be giant minivans so it probably won’t matter and nearly everything else already made the switch.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    It ain’t this American’s ride, but if it’s yours, then go with God.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    The 97 Ford Expedition called…it wants its IRS back =P

    The front cabin looks heavily inspired by the kia telluride…especially those grab handles on the center console edge.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    GM needs to put the team in charge of this interior to work on the Silverado, stat.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    As soon as the Denali version comes out, my Texas sister-in-law (who is not from Houston or Dallas, but from a small town in one of the reddest counties in all of America) will be off to the GMC store pronto. She’s going to love the fancier interior and the extra third-row space.

    I promise you she will not feel one pang, or even think one thought, about the missing solid axle.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      At one point it seemed like as high a percentage of my friends who once had E46 BMWs were driving beige Yukon Denalis. I had a Super Bowl party where my driveway looked like a fleet parking lot for the things. Then the current generation with the garish chrome grill came out. Suddenly the Denalis vanished from my life. I don’t know who buys them now, but they kicked the quiet money to the curb.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        This sister-in-law’s current Denali is her fourth GM BOF SUV, so not a trend response. She went full bling this time, with not just the Denali package but also black paint, the OEM polished 22s, and GM accessory chrome door handles.

      • 0 avatar

        They seem to come in go in waves in the wealthy neighborhoods near me. 07-14 versions were and still are everywhere. I see quitea few of the 14 and up but it seems like a little downswing from before. By the driveways I would say Nissan and Inifiti may have taken a few sales along with high trim Grand Cherokees, and some to FoMoCo. I think these will do well here thou. I think GM was having some trouble on this interior accommodations compared to the competition this should fix it.

  • avatar
    How_Embarrassing_4You

    LMFAO. One part GM ugly, another part steal from Ford. Yes, let the money printing begin! HAHAHAHAHA!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    “Elsewhere on the pair, standard LED lamps appear fore and aft, no doubt helping the models’ future standing with the IIHS.”
    IIHS has never tested these cars except for child seat latch anchors. IIHS will never test cars of this cost and low volume in the market place. You should present the real facts when reporting.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Did they forget to install the column shifter? A quick search shows it’s absent from all the glamour shots, like it’s too hideous or something. Or 1950’s tractor.

  • avatar
    How_Embarrassing_4You

    I love it. Any other car..lets just, for familiarity sakes, say it’s LEXUS..if it were Lexus man would these new GM trucks be hammered for those ugly AF grills. Good job aping Ford styling and rear suspension though GM. And are the back ends of these things pre-broken? They sure look like they’ve been cracked almost in half in every picture I’ve seen so far. GM does it again!

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Looks like quite an interesting design for a 4 link independent rear axle. I guess a unitized body was a step too far, but the suspension is as dependent on squishy bushings for actual hub articulation movement as a Mercedes. But at least the laughable stick rear axle has been jettisoned. If you still want to buck and heave and tow horse trailers there’s always pickups.

    I see on another site that BWI is making the air springs. They already make the magnetic ride dampers for all GM, and VW. If you want to be riled up about Chinesium, BWI is BeijingWest Industries, the folks who took Delphi Magneride off GM’s hands back in 2009. They have just opened a facility in Greenfield IN, so maybe the dampers and airsprings for these new SUVs will be US-sourced. Besides China, their other three factories up to now are in Eastern Europe and the UK.

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