By on November 11, 2019

2018 Ford F-150 , Image: Ford

A family member asked me advice about a possible vehicle purchase over the weekend. The vehicle in question was something they had been thinking of for a while, seeing it as just the thing to support the day-to-day lives and vacation preferences of a traditional nuclear family. While lesser vehicles could easily cover most of the family’s needs, albeit with some concessions on the part of kids, pets, or luggage, this one did everything.

It may come as no shock that the mystery vehicle here happens to be the world’s best-selling vehicle.

Yes, the Ford F-150, especially an off-lease one with a lowered sticker price, offers the broadest of appeal. There’s no sale yet, but it’s leaning that way.

Earlier, the family looked at a Nissan Pathfinder, finding the three-row crossover to be spacious but entirely forgettable, with a tow rating that fell below the desired tonnage. Then came the F-150.

The “once-bitten” phenomenon is real. After one spin behind the wheel, any doubts that existed about the suitability — and perhaps most importantly, the desirability — of this vehicle melted away. They were converts, though concerns still exist re: fuel economy.

You can’t get everything in life, I suppose.

The experience of this family member repeats itself daily in North America, with individuals from all walks of life finding themselves irresistibly attracted to the go-anywhere capability and commanding road presence of a full-size 4×4 pickup. Any full-size 4X4 pickup. If sales numbers tell us anything, it’s a hard attraction to shake.

Our question today is this: If you happen to be one of these people, did you ever go back to sedans, hatches, or CUVs? Could you?

[Image: Ford]

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88 Comments on “QOTD: No Going Back?...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I haven’t made this move, but a number of my friends have. Typically, they turn around and in short order buy a replacement pickup that has everything that their first tentative step into the pickup world didn’t have. Then, they keep that vehicle for a normal duration before buying another like it.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Every so often I get interested in a new truck.
    Then I test it out and realize that there is no way I’d enjoy owning it and forget about it until the next generation comes along to repeat the cycle.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    We always have a pickup or large SUV capable of towing 7,000lbs because we own several different trailers. The current truck is a 2018 Ram 1500 Longhorn. If we sold the trailers, we’d sell the truck for a minivan or car 100%.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Frankly with cars becoming continually less appealing and significantly less durable in multiple ways, and with choice in True SUVs being nearly non existent, the only place most Americans have to turn are pickups. I’m not far off myself, a 7.3L F250 is calling my name as a good daily driver and vacation vehicle.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I doubt I would ever make an HD truck my only vehicle, but I would never be without one either. They are too useful at too many things with too small a tradeoff. I can’t imagine going back to a half ton, let alone being without a truck entirely.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I feel similar in that I prefer 4 full doors and an 8′ bed so that means no 1/2 ton, and I can’t see using it as a daily driver. So I have a car for that. But if I had to have a multi-tool to cover as wide a range as possible there is no doubt it would be a 1/2 ton, crew cab, 4×4.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I agree in that if you forced me to live with only one vehicle it would be a 1/2 ton crew cab.

        It would be a real challenge for me to give up the 8 foot bed as you say. Plus I prefer the HDs for their component durability and simple engine design.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I do like the beefier components of the 3/4 ton and larger trucks too. However today’s 1/2 tons, in the right configuration, can out tow and/or carry nearly as much as the 3/4 ton trucks of my youth.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I previously owned an SUV (Rodeo) and I still own a truck (Dakota). The SUV lasted just 8 months before I was sick of it. I’ve always owned smaller, sporty cars (no kids, no pets) so me and SUVs just didn’t get along. I keep my truck for boat towing duty only because as a daily driving its a snooze that I’d rather avoid.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I saw a brodozer with stretched tires on Friday. I could have done without seeing that.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Nope, minivan and sedan for us.
    I have no need for a truck. I get everything shipped to our door and don’t own expensive mantoys like a boat or RV.
    I don’t do my own major renovations, I’d rather pay someone to do it, so no need to haul materials.
    Even if I had to get a new engine or transmission for my project car I’d get it shipped on a pallet.

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      Agree Cactuar
      No ranch, no boat, no trailer and any project big enough to require a truck I hire someone to do it. Small project materials easily fit in our CUV.
      AWD RAV4 V6 (winter mountain travel) and Accord for me.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    I’m on my 3rd F-150. The first one replaced a 2011 3-series, and I chose that route for a number of reasons. BMW had stopped making drivers’ cars, and the subsequent generation 3 felt cheap and numb. I was tired of Ohio roads bending rims and deteriorating suspension components. I had a boat, which required some sort of additional vehicle to tow it if I wanted to keep it. Speed limits and traffic made driving a fun, fast car frustrating much of the time. I found myself hauling trailers and stuff and people far more often than I found myself hauling @$$, in other words. The trucks have been fine. Not especially reliable, to the point that I’m probably changing brands next time to see if maybe someone else knows how to make a truck that doesn’t glitch all the time. I fantasize about getting an old Tundra and a Boxster or something. But I probably won’t.

  • avatar
    redapple

    I hear the New Ram with air suspension rides like the old luxo barge lincolns.

    I d like that.

    • 0 avatar
      PM300

      I haven’t driven one with the air suspension but the ride with the standard coil suspension on my 2019 Ram is fantastic compared to my buddy’s 2019 F-150. 9/10 times I don’t bother to swerve Michigan potholes and they barely register inside the truck. Coming from a Chrysler 300 on 20 inch wheels/rubber band tires, it’s a nice feeling not to have to fear our crumbling roads. Also, the dang thing is basically as quite inside as my wife’s Cadillac. She has lower wind noise but my suspension is quieter so they seem equal to me. I just have the Big Horn edition, I’ve heard the Limited’s are even quieter.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @redapple – don’t get an “air ride” Ram if you live in an area that has cold winters. I know a fellow who’s truck suspension freezes up every time it gets bellow -20C.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I buy what I like and can afford. My vehicles have to do at least one thing very well. My 73 F250 has served me and my father before me well. My 2000 F250 is probably the last heavy duty truck I will ever buy unless it gets destroyed in an accident. It has the 7.3 diesel and nothing made currently by Ford or any other brand is tempting. My wife had a 2018 F 150 with the 5 liter v8 as a loaner while our Fusion was waiting on it’s takata airbags to be replaced. She absolutely loved it. We averaged about 22 mpg over 4000 miles and she said the seats were the most comfortable she had yet experienced. So I strongly lean towards one of these replacing our Enclave when the time comes. The only thing that gives me pause is the 3 foot long timing chain that ford puts in the 5 liter v8 as well as the 3.5 ecoboost. They stretch over time and best case will likely require replacement by 100,000 miles. If only I could by the Ford with a small block gm V8.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    My example is hardly a fair representation, as the one pickup I owned was a rough old 2WD single cab F150 that struggled to get 15mpg, but after that, everything I’ve owned have been small four-cylinder cars. Granted, I liked the F150 fine (A/C is probably the only creature comfort I really wanted), and I’d own it again if I had a big piece of property. But, I live in a condo, and any hauling needs I have are better met by a minivan.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I probably have my last truck and yes I did recently buy my neighbor’s low mileage 2012 Lacrosse but I also have a 2013 CRV which is a perfect compromise vehicle especially since I will retire in the next few years. Don’t really have a need for an HD pickup but I fully understand those who do have a need for one including my nephew with his 1 ton Cummins Ram Dually. About 20 years ago I could have used an HD pickup when I lived on the family farm now I plan on downsizing after retiring. The trucks I have had in recent years have been midsize and that is about the perfect size for my needs. My 2008 Isuzu I-370 4×4 crew cab has a towing package but I never have used it and I doubt I will. It is my only truck and it has more than enough power and room for my needs.

  • avatar

    I had an extended cab Toyota than an extended cab Dakota. Those were preceded by various full size and midsize SUV’s. After the Dakota got a minivan which lasted a few months before the current Durango. Minivan’s are awesome but towing is much better with the Durango. I really want a pickup again but this time it will likley be a crewcab fullsize. Taking out seats or hooking up the utility trailer is sometimes enough of annoyance that I try to avoid it, whereas the pickups were ready to go run to the lumber yard or dump without a 2nd thought.

  • avatar
    Jon

    I grew up driving trucks because I needed one for work. I no longer need them for work since i now commute to a desk and computer. Now i drive a Camry and feel sad every time i drive it. I would love to drive a truck again but cant justify the price and mileage.

    New diesel half tons and midsizers give me optimism on the mileage metric but still fail the price metric miserably.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I love trucks – but have only owned (or wanted to own) the mini or mid-sized. Nissans and Toyotas. Full-sized trucks, especially in my close-to-the-city suburb would be a pain to park, plus I would only need its capabilities a few times a year. So no truck for me – though if I could find a minty first-generation Tundra, I would be happy. Or a 1972 Chevy!

    • 0 avatar
      RSF

      I always thought small trucks would be easier to park also, until I had to rent one for two weeks. It was a Frontier and an absolute pain to turn into a spot to park. The wheel was heavy with a slow ratio and the turning radius was huge. My F150 is much, much easier to park and live with daily. Fuel mileage with my 3.5L ecoboost crew is better as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Can’t claim to have ever driven a Frontier but I have to say I never had that kind of problem with any other “compact” pickups I have ever driven and certainly my Colorado is anything BUT clumsy. I had an F-150 (1990)and the thing was simply a Road Whale™ while my ’97 Ranger was fun to drive–but grossly underpowered. That little Ranger was quite agile though, an ease to park in any regular parallel spot. I don’t doubt that as they got bigger, they got heavier however, which could make the steering heavier if they didn’t adapt to the heavier weight of the truck. I expect because it was a rental it simply was not properly maintained by the rental agency.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The confluence of impulsion that lead to the first purchase of a truck is very likely just one decision point in a sequence of choices which favor capability over practicality, convenience over necessity.

    For many it might be a graduation into a secure self-sufficiency….a resource for land-owners, a doomsday vehicle, a big ATV you get to take to Walmart, a safe, all-season family getaround, the new lampoon Wagoneer.

    It is an integral part of this great, liberty loving, DIY nation we’ve built here in America. I think there is a distinct life before Truck and life after Truck.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Not sure where you are getting the F150 is the worlds best selling vehicle. Ford does not disclose the sales numbers of the F150.

    The “worlds best selling vehicle” isn’t even a vehicle. It’s a series of 4 different vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      NeilM

      EBFlex writes: “Not sure where you are getting the F150 is the worlds best selling vehicle. Ford does not disclose the sales numbers of the F150.”

      I wondered that myself. See: https://www.best-selling-cars.com/global/2018-full-year-international-global-top-selling-car-models/
      F-Series 1,075,153
      Corolla 934,348

      Me, I drive the best truck there is — the one my neighbor parks in front of his house and lets me use anytime I need a truck. Otherwise I prefer my Golf R, the E36 M3, or my wife’s Audi Q5, depending.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        If it helps settle any questions of legitimacy to Ford’s claim to best selling, it isn’t like Corollas aren’t tailored to the markets they’re sold in to the point that they have different dimensions, bodies and engine families to suit regional regulations and desires.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “F-Series 1,075,153
        Corolla 934,348”

        Thanks for proving my point. The F-Series is not a vehicle. Ford does not make a 2019 F-Series. You cannot get insurance on a 2019 F-Series. You cannot get parts for a 2019 F-Series.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      They share a body so not all that different and they report full-sized truck sales like everyone else.

      I own my truck and lease my fun car. I never loan my truck out…it’s like loaning out your wife…you don’t want anyone throwing a rod in either one.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I can see the appeal if you live in a place where things are never crowded. Pickups are endlessly configurable and pretty versatile, especially if you splash out for a tonneau cover.

    But for our life in the city, even the half-tons are just too big for everyday driving needs. At my house, I can’t park one anywhere; it’s too long and wide for the garage, too long for the driveway, and too wide for the parking lane next to my house. We’d also have trouble either (1) getting into or (2) finding workable spots inside many of the parking garages we use on a regular basis.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      This is a bit of a mystery to me too. I had use of a double-cab, eight-foot bed Tundra for a while. I liked the truck and enjoyed driving it, but I really didn’t want to use it when I didn’t have to unless I knew about parking options before I embarked. I live in Virginia Beach now. When I go Krogering, I see all the pretty Navy wives parking their crew cab trucks on the outskirts of the parking lot. I’ve been a fan of parking far from doors and crosswalks for decades, but only fairly recently have I noticed the phenomenon of big pickup drivers who don’t park close in either because they can’t or don’t want to.

      When I’m in California, I see a huge percentage of traffic always consists of diesel pickups. I have no idea what they do when they’re not in traffic, as most parking spots are intentionally too small for anything bigger than a Harley-Davidson.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        There’s a guy who works in my building who drives a diesel, crew cab, medium bed F-250 to work every day. He has to drive to the very bottom of the (six-floor) garage, where there is a spot where he can wedge in by folding his right mirror and where the fact that his truck sticks 3 feet out of the spot doesn’t block anyone like it would elsewhere in the garage. That’s just too much trouble to go through every day.

        But at least he doesn’t work at the Columbia Center a block down the street, where the garage height limit is 6’0″ and his truck wouldn’t fit inside at all. Or go to the co-op grocery near my house, where there’s one corner that a vehicle over about 16 feet long can’t fit through without a several-point turn.

        Our larger vehicle is a Highlander. It’s about the biggest size that’s practical if you are often parking in downtown Seattle.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        It’s California. They are never not in Traffic. The pickups you see, start their commute from somewhere in the back of beyond Hesperia or Salton sea at 3am, and arrive back home around 2am, if they are lucky. If they are not, they just have to turn around before making it all the way back home.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Those full size trucks are lifestyle vehicles. The real workhorses are the one those dirty workers drive daily, and around here they are usually 20 year old Tacoma with a camper shell, not a late model F150. Those F150 owners if they are in the construction businesses are always the “management”, “adjusters”, “owners”, “quote providers”, etc, not the one with actual tools doing actual work.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I travel enough and am observant enough to know that vehicle preferences have strong regional trends, so I don’t doubt that what you’ve written is true where you are. Where I am, you can’t go a mile without seeing four F150s being used by guys who earn their livings with their hands and backs. They probably didn’t buy them new, which is all the more reason for them to drive the same brands and models chosen by big earners.

  • avatar
    ilkhan

    I went from a ’16 Mustang GT to a ’17 F-150 lariat 3.5EB 4×4. Wanted the cargo space, towing otions, and all around everything. The 3.5EB has jaw dropping speed for a full size truck (not nearly as fast as the mustang was, but its a truck), comfortable ride, and mongo space for cargo both in the cab and the bed. Towing, hauling, camping, etc I’ve actually used it as a truck. My biggest complaint is the size, as a daily driver its just big. I take my wife’s vehicle (Outback) whenever possible on short trips around town.

    Can I live without a truck? Yes. I fully expect to add a Model Y come summer. Yes, *add*. I can live without the truck, but I don’t really want to. The things that a truck can do are not things that a compact CUV can really replicate.

    Of course, I’d scalpal the fuck out of it if I could afford my dream garage. F-150 raptor, Y, Mustang, Roadster.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    Maybe it’s just me, but not having a lockable “trunk” means it is a no go to me. When you are doing that why not just switch to a minivan with a roof rack or a 3 row SUVs? Because you never know when is that one time out of 5 years will you use all 3 rows right?

    Personally I think a station wagon + a pickup truck would be a good combo for a family. If you can only have 1, then minivan + a roof rack any day.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      We (family of four with a MIL or other kids tagging along from time to time) use the third row more often than we would use a bed. And, as described above, we find small size a huge asset given our particular driving environment.

      We are very happy with our current fleet: a Chevy Bolt, which does almost all of the in-city driving and will fit in any parking space anywhere, and a Toyota Highlander Hybrid, which gives us a third row when needed and is awesome for long-distance cruising. When something comes up that’s too big to fit, I’ll either rent a pickup or finally pony up for a proper roof rack for the HiHy.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Many modern trucks have lockable tail gates and most of the hard covers also lock. I’ve also seen weather strip kits for the tail gate to seal them up, so with a 1 piece cover that hangs over the bed rail you have a weather tight locking trunk.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “Many modern trucks have lockable tail gates and most of the hard covers also lock. ”

        Hard covers ruin the versatility of a PU truck. I’ve run soft ones both my PU’s. Don’t need to worry about locking them, out of sight out of mind or if it is something really valuable that can be picked up and walked away with fairly easily just put it in the cab.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      PandaBear

      An $800.00ish hard tonneau cover takes care of your concern.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        But then why buy a pickup if you have a top on it most of the time? I personally would keep it on if I have this, rather than taking it on and off on a regular basis. In that case why don’t I just get an SUV? and rent a pickup when needed?

  • avatar
    PM300

    I recently made the switch to a full sized half ton truck after only having cars, most of which were manuals/semi-fun to drive, in large part to finish remodeling my house. I love the truck overall but I’m still on the fence if I want it to stay as an only vehicle as it’s kind of a pain to park living in the City and it’s not remotely fun to drive. Been toying with idea of picking up an older sports car once my home renovations are done in 2020 to supplement the lack of fun had in the truck. If I can realistically keep a separate fun car without the wife disowning me, I don’t see myself not having a truck in the household again for the foreseeable future.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I don’t haul dirty stuff often enough to justify a pickup bed. I do have need to haul 3 kids and the occasional friend around, so we recently bought a 3 row SUV after our minivan was totaled.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    dal20402, I understand if it’s a tight fit in some places, except everything you said goes against the Uniform Building Code of North America. Automakers are acutely aware of the limits, and obviously careful to stay within them. The more inept drivers of compacts have a hard enough time as it is.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Cities have very different codes for parking, and in any event much of the environment we drive in (including our house, driveway, and street) was there well before anything that looked like current codes.

      My street started life as a pair of streetcar tracks. The cars came later.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        So if I parked my F-150 against the curb on your street, would it get towed away? Are there signs prohibiting? I’m guessing 99.8% of North Americans live outside of pre Civil War Colonial villages.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          It wouldn’t get towed, but it would stick into the bike lane a few inches and might get a ticket. My Highlander is about four inches narrower than an F-150 and just barely fits. If I wedge the right tires against the curb (which is fortunately a low curb, so no danger of curb rash) the left tires are right on the lane line.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            There must be signs if they can issue tickets. Is it against anything over 76 inches, including fullsize autos/SUV? I’m facilitated by this, and does that include mirrors?

            But I’m even more intrigued by parking structures not up to code!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            It is a matter of fitting into the parking lane, which is marked by a solid white line. It’s part of city code, not posted on specific signs:

            “Where parking stalls or spaces are marked or painted upon the curb and/or pavement of the street, or alley, no person shall park any vehicle so that any part of such vehicle occupies more than one (1) such space, protrudes beyond the markings designating such space, or is in the adjacent area for use for safe maneuvering into and out of a designated parking space.”

            Most parking lanes in the city are 84″ wide, but there are exceptions in the oldest part of the city. My street was first paved sometime around 1903.

            My former neighbor had a full-size pickup and often stuck out a bit into the bike lane. i don’t know if he was ticketed but I do know of an incident where a cyclist got squeezed between his truck and a passing truck that was being careless about the lane line.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            That would be unusual for the Seattle police to ticket something like hanging into a bike lane, unless there were a lot of repeated complaints about a specific vehicle. They never ticket people for parking the wrong direction. They also don’t ticket for parking with wheels up on the curb so they aren’t hanging out into the street or bike lane.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    I had a rental Dodge Ram a bit ago and I can feel the appeal. My boys absolutely loved it and it was super handy for their sports equipment and a few runs for mulch. But I was much less enamored with its 17mpg instead of the 30mpg in my Accord. My commute was much more expensive for those two weeks. That extra gas added up fast.

    I would, however, be very happy with an old pick-up for a few more heavy duty needs like those mulch runs or a boat tow. But the insanity of old used truck prices keeps me from pulling the trigger. So while I’d like to get into a pick-up, long gone are the days of old 4×4 farm trucks going for peanuts.

    Our paid-off Odyssey does just about everything I need it do do except tow the boat. And since my neighbors are resplendent in their Rubicons, QX80s, Land Cruisers and GMC Denali’s, I’m set up just fine for getting in an out at the ramp once in spring and once in fall.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’ve not yet seen the need to own a truck full time. Any occasion where I personally need one is satisfied by doing a short term rental and being done with it.

    The CX-5 I recently picked up is about as large as I want or need. Much as I wanted to stick to sedans, it got harder and harder since I regularly drive family members around who have limited mobility. Dropping down into a sedan was a challenge for them, especially those who’ve had joints replaced.

  • avatar
    deanst

    I’m still confused about what this article has to do with the worlds best selling vehicle – the Toyota Corolla.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    I have several friends that drive full-size pickups. At times I see the appeal and think I would consider owning one myself as a primary vehicle. Then I drive my 1992 F-150 Custom standard cab/8ft. box and complain everytime I try to park it – just not easy. Also, I think I’m too cheap to suffer the cost of gas of an F-150 as a day-to-day driver when I put on 30K miles a year, mostly with just me in the car. An F-150 as a second (or third) vehicle in the household? My Dad always had a Suburban for this purpose. I think an upgrade of my current F-150 to one with 4WD would be perfect in this scenario.

  • avatar
    piratethecat

    I just wish Honda would beef up the Ridgeline. I don’t need to be able to tow and haul a house, but I also don’t want to drive an Odyssey with a bed. And it’s interesting that the Ridgeline doesn’t get better gas mileage than the F-150 with the 2.7L engine.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    I’ve owned three pickup trucks over my driving career (1986 Mitsubishi/Dodge D-50, 1998 Ford Ranger, 2004 Ford F-150).

    I’ve found all of these trucks to be useful tools, but they all sucked as daily drivers in one way or another (with the Ranger sucking the least).

    I don’t currently own a truck. My current car is a Mazda5 (family car) and a Honda Civic (long distance commuter).

    I won’t hesitate to own a truck again, when I need one. If I were to DD a full-size pickup, it would need to be an EV or PHEV for drivability and environmental reasons (my F-150 needed a 4.5L beast-engine just to keep up with our Prius) — but a weekend/beater truck is whatever I can get cheaply. Pick up trucks are useful tools, but I’d rather drive a Prius or a Civic when I’m not carrying a load.

  • avatar
    Dan

    This is me to a T. I did the newish sedan with an old truck for dead deer and furniture as a second vehicle for a while, and realized as soon as the old truck got reasonably up to date (08 GMT900) that in addition to doing all of the truck stuff it was also a better car than any of the cars. I daily drove that one for a while, then I bought a new Ram, now I’m in a 2016 Ford.

    Truck like handling: Everyone calls this a con. It’s one of the biggest pros. A car that doesn’t reward driving like a dickhead keeps you from driving like a dickhead. Traffic isn’t as frustrating. You don’t get tickets. It’s a revelation.

    Mileage: Everyone talks about this which suggests that no one can do math.

    Parking: Sucks. This knock is true. Three point U-turns. Hell, three point right turns. Back in everywhere. Open the doors halfway. Fold the mirrors. You can make it work but you can’t make it not suck.

    They should bring back Quadrasteer.

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      great post. I agree on all points.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “A car that doesn’t reward driving like a dickhead keeps you from driving like a dickhead. Traffic isn’t as frustrating. You don’t get tickets. It’s a revelation.”

      I’ve noticed whenever someone is trying crawl up my a$$ while I’m in the Volt it’s never a FS PU or SUV. It’s always someone in a small or midsize car/suv. Why is that?

      That said, having owned a CC PU you just can’t beat the versatility. My SUV will be replaced with a PU eventually and life will be good again!……….LOL

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “A car that doesn’t reward driving like a dickhead keeps you from driving like a dickhead. Traffic isn’t as frustrating. You don’t get tickets. It’s a revelation.”

      I’ve never really needed the incentive of a poor handling and/or slow vehicle to avoid aggressive driving, but YMMV.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        Come drive in Maryland some time. There’s a level of population density beyond which enthusiastic driving even without overt aggression is still stepping on someone else’s toes. We’re there. If it’s between 0700 and 2200 then someone else’s car is ahead of, next to, usually your other next to, and behind you. When there isn’t, and you finally have room to lay some rubber, it’s right next to the window of someone else’s house.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          There are several people on TTAC cursed by eternally terrible traffic and I completely understand not caring about your vehicle’s handling prowess beyond reasonable safety.

          This line is where you lose me though “A car that doesn’t reward driving like a dickhead keeps you from driving like a dickhead.” It sounds like if you were in a Q50 (or whatever) you’d be too tempted to go red mist through traffic so the truck keeps you “honest” on the road.

          Maybe it would be an issue in a GT350r or a 4C but the vast majority of cars (even performance-oriented ones) handle traffic and school zones just fine.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    It is hard to beat the utility of any pickup. A midsize extended cab pickup has more than enough bed space for most suburbanites. A crew cab has less bed space but a bed extender can give you additional space. I do have a bed extender for my crew cab Isuzu and I can make it work for my needs. I have used the 4 wheel drive a number of times.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Never understood the popularity of pick up trucks and the rest of the world outside of USA seem to hold the sane position as well. Unless you have to tow or carry a lot of cargo on regular basis, a pick up truck has capabilities that most people don’t need and waste by using it as a commuter cars. In Detroit metro area where pick up trucks rule, the number of pick up trucks actually towing or hauling cargo is minimal. A medium size SUV can suffice for most family’s vacation needs and has better ride, handling, and gas millage.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It would be like explaining, ‘why a log cabin’ to someone who’s never been out of NYC.

      A friend that commutes for up to 5 hours daily gave up his Corolla for a Silverado puts it like this: “Life’s too short”.

      He arrives at both ends feeling fresh as a daisy, instead of beat to death. I used to fly to east or west coasts to visit family, or rent a cheap car, but now I just drive out my F-150, and there’s nothing better.

      I’ll drive for up to 20 hours straight and feel like I can go 20 more.

      It has way more to do with what a pickup can do for you on paper, towing/payload, etc. Yeah it’s a lifestyle, and you feel like you can do anything, go anywhere, anytime, except without having to get permission, fax docs, plan it months in advance, etc.

      Is it the spirit of adventure? Nah. They’re just vehicles. If pickups were never invented, we’d do the exact same things with the next best vehicles, probably 4wd vans of some sort, but with a tailgate to drop, sit on, work bench, etc. And a roof mounted 5th wheel some how.

      I don’t know about the rest of the world but it’s tough not to think it wouldn’t know “a good time” if it fell out sky, landed on its face and started to wiggle.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        In other words, the pickup truck has become the luxury station wagon everybody wants.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Pick up trucks

          Extended cab = coupe

          4 door crew cab = sedan

          Suburban/Expedition/Tahoe/Yukon/4Runner = wagon

          One of these days somebody in the executive suite is going to wise up and start offering rigid bed covers as a factory installed option.

          Then the sedan-ifcation of the truck will be complete.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I miss my Jeep Wrangler. My Colorado is a luxury car by comparison.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    I entered pickup land in 2015, when I retired and my wife had the crazy idea of buying an Airstream travel trailer and seeing the USA. Oddly enough, I learned to drive in a pickup while working on a ranch when I was 14, many, many years ago. Other than a few summer jobs while I was in college that involved driving a variety of trucks, some much bigger than a pickup, I left truck world a very long time ago.

    For people who haven’t been in one for 40 years, today’s pickups are surprisingly civilized rides. However, owning a full-size pickup as the family vehicle has two big drawbacks. First, while they get surprisingly good mileage on the highway when driven at legal speeds, their big engines suck gas like nobody’s business when idling. Moreover, their approximately 5,000 lb. [empty] weight takes a lot of energy to get moving, all of which is dumped into the air as heat when you have to hit the brakes in stop-and-go traffic. A suburban grocery-getter/commuter vehicle they are not. Secondly, even the “short bed” versions of full-size pickups are big. They are wide and completely fill a standard-sized parking lot space. And their length means that fitting into the typical street parallel parking space is a chore if there are vehicles parked at either end of it. I spend most of my time in a semi-rural area but maintain an apartment in the city. So, the pickup works fine for me, doing what I do with it, including occasional trips to my apartment. But if I lived in the suburbs or the city (as I did in my working years) I wouldn’t think of having a pickup. Back then, our family of 5 rode around in a minivan. They’re not cool; but they work.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I get why many have gravitated to full size pickup trucks that can do what sedans can do plus do truck things, hence the great market share growth of pickup trucks that while hauling a$$es and gear in the crew/club/quad cabin, mostly haul air in the bed (and yes, there are some, albeit a distinct minority of such truck buyers/lessors now, who do actually use the bed and/or towing capabilities for work and/or recreational use).

    As for me, I could never daily a pickup, lest my life requirements and preferences did a 180.

    Any full size pickup is a cumbersom, unwieldy thing, that has too much play in the steering wheel, too much lean in the corners and turns, too much wheel hop in the rear suspension with an unloaded bed, and a still too hard plastic-filled interior to feel tight, composed and refined as an enjoyable daily driver (the new RAM is by far the most acceptable of the lot though).

    Also, most of these things are ridiculous looking, especially from the perspective of the grill (GMC), the size and style of the rest of the vehicle (unnecessarily garish and large), and oh so Bro-Dozerish).

    Even many quite large SUVs have superior steering/tracking, ride quality, interior material material refinement (from dash to floors to doors), and ride quality versus full size pickups.

    I can do a MB E Class, Lexus ES, Toyota Avalon, Chrysler 300, BMW 5 (or even 3) series, Audi A4/A6, or the quite excellent for-money new gen Honda Accord Sport (as large inside with as much standard technology as premium sedans costing 2x as much or more), I can do a Durango or Telluride or X5 or Highlander or MDX or CX-5 or ML350 or many other SUVs and even some CUVs…

    …but to daily a big, heavy in front/light in back, unnecessarily large, numb tiller, hard to park, relatively industrial grade interior, cumbersome handling, modern full size pickup, when it’s rarely going to be used for what pickups where conceived to do, is a bridge too far.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Go mid-sized. While I’m not a fan of Ford’s choice of a single turbo four, the performance and handling are decent, if not great, and it’s enough smaller that it can serve more easily as a car-full-size coupe or sedan. And the way my Colorado feels doesn’t offer the ‘light tail, heavy nose’ sensation you mention, despite the fact it’s got a V6 under the hood and not four.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I had a 2015 F150 5.0L from late 2015 until March 2019. I moved on to a 2017 Focus ST for fuel economy reasons. Next spring I plan to move on again to an Accord 2.0T with a manual. That I will keep for its full life. I suspect the manual will drop off for the accord for 2021, or at its next refresh cycle anyway.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I would not go back to a CUV from any vehicle.

    That said, the new trucks are very tall to get in and out of. Unless I really needed a bed I wouldn’t buy another truck because of that.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I learned to drive on a 63 IH Series 1000 step side when I was 15. The IH had a straight 6, three on the tree, manual choke, all gauges, and the only extra equipment was a heater. The new full size pickups are taller than I like and I don’t really need the size. If you need their capabilities there is nothing like them but otherwise they are not much fun to drive on a daily basis. After having a crew cab and an extended cab midsize pickup the extended cab has the more usable bed and if I were to get a new one it would be an extended cab with a rear seat delete if offered since the rear seats are unusable for anyone except a small child. The extra space in the extended cab is nice for carrying items that you do not want to be exposed to weather and theft. My 99 S-10 I used to the fullest for 20 1/2 years and now it lives with my nephew. It is a great running truck and I used the bed countless times for hauling–it more than paid for itself. I miss the 5 speed manual which was fun to drive and very reliable the last manual I most likely will ever own because they are disappearing and are as rare as a unicorn.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Vulpine-My 2008 Isuzu I-370 is like a luxury vehicle as well. The ride is the smoothest ride I have ever had in a truck and with the heated leather seats and the auto dim mirrors and power everything I don’t feel like I am in a truck. Very easy to operate 4 wheel drive. It has almost every option that was available in 2008 (same truck as the 2008 Colorado and Canyon).

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    “Our question today is this: If you happen to be one of these people, did you ever go back to sedans, hatches, or CUVs? Could you?”

    Heck yeah. I have pickups and SUVs, but 90% of the time I prefer to drive cars of varying descriptions (sports cars, muscle cars, sedans).

    As for your family member, for something they will presumably keep for years, 15 minutes each driving the major players is time very well spent. I would never in a million years choose the F150 if I also took the time to test drive Sierra and Ram.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The answer is yes because of not having a car for about 6 1/2 years I bought my neighbor’s 2012 Lacrosse. I also have a cuv and a midsize crew cab pickup.

  • avatar
    don1967

    I went to a full-size truck despite the lack of any objective reason, and as much as I enjoy it there probably won’t be a sequel. Next ride will likely be an AWD wagon or possibly liftback.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I have almost always owned pickups. There were 2 years where I owned a Safari van but I did not like having my cargo occupy the same space as me. I just move between small truck, 1/2 ton and HD based upon my needs at the time.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree if you have dirty loads or large bulky items then a truck is a much better choice. The only question is do you use it enough to pay for itself which some of us do but trucks are not for everyone. I have utilized my trucks to the fullest but I will eventually reach a point where I will not but that is more of a lifestyle change.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I went from a coupe to a full sized pickup, back to a Pony car (Firebird), to another Pony Car (Camaro), then to a full sized old school SUV, a Blazer. From the Blazer to a minivan to a compact SUV, then to 2 Jeep Grand Cherokees, and then a Sierra 1500 Ext cab 4×4, and finally a Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4×4 when the GMC got wrecked. I loved the Ram. I had one single issue with it, fixed under warranty, and when it was almost 5 years old, I had to go back to a car after I was seriously injured in late 2007. Since then, I’ve had a Charger R/T, a Challenger R/T, and now a Challenger Scatpack. If I wasn’t crippled, I would almost surely have held onto the Ram, which I saw a few days ago, rusted, but seemingly running fine, for a winter vehicle. Anytime the weather gets bad, I miss the full sized trucks and SUVs I’ve had.

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