By on September 3, 2019

If there’s one thing the lads at Ram enjoy more than making torque, it’s making new trim variants for its various lines of pickup trucks. The old Ram 1500 Classic has enjoyed countless special trims during its long life, including a few colors which your extroverted author found to be quite fetching (Ignition Orange and Sublime, anyone?).

Now, the marketing arm of the company is applying similar treatments to the new Ram 1500. In addition to a Night Edition, which slathers the grille and other addenda in inky paint, the off-road focused Rebel gets a fresh trim as well.

Look and laugh at these paint-and-wallpaper editions all you want, but the simple fact is that the company wouldn’t be creating them if they didn’t make bank. Massive bank, actually. Truck owners are always looking for a way to either stand out from — or one-up — their neighbors; packages like these are an easy way for Ram (or any manufacturer) to juice sales. This helps explain why Ram has overtaken Chevy for the number two spot in American pickup volume.

If you’re looking for specifics, the Ram 1500 Night Edition, available on Big Horn and Laramie models, will have its grille, badges, and wheels all dipped in black paint. Its headlamps and taillights feature dark bezels. A similar Black Appearance Group shows up on the Rebel with similar styling supplements.

Rebel also gets new standard kit for 2020 including the likes of a power tailgate, wireless charging, and heated rear seats. An optional Safety Group, not previously available on Rebel, adds adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning, and lane departure klaxons.

Not to be left out, the beefcake Ram Heavy Duty also gets a yaffle of new items for 2020. Lane keeping and adaptive steering is now available across the board, much to the delight of fleet buyers across the nation. Blind-spot monitoring now covers the trailer and, speaking of hauling, Ram will now offer trailer tire pressure monitoring on all trims. In a response to GM’s camera-fest on its trucks, Ram HD’s auxiliary cam system now supports two different units. Crew Cab models with an 8-foot bed will also now have a huge 50-gallon fuel tank, providing a theoretical bladder-busting cruising range of over 1,000 miles.

Ram also stirred the paint pot, now listing a tasty Hydro Blue and Olive Green on both light- and heavy-duty models. RV Match Walnut Brown will also show up on 1500-grade trucks, an option at which — again — most will chuckle. What those scofflaws fail to realize is that most RV owners are flush with cash and would like nothing more than their truck to match their trailer.

Look for all these options, save for the Olive Green, sooner rather than later at your Ram store.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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24 Comments on “Ram Ladles New Options and Packages on Its 1500 and HD Pickups...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    50 gallon tank? That’s a refreshing sight to see, I’m tired of seeing trucks with these less than 30 gallon tanks and worse is cars with less than 20 gallon tanks. What do the automakers think these vehicles are being used for? Getting gas every 2 days is unnecessary if we could just have normal sized tanks.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The 50 (US) gallon tank is only available on long box crewcab trucks. That is most likely to keep long haul RV, fleet and hotshot drivers happy. It should be made available on all 8 ft box trucks since those are the ones most likely to be used for work. I rarely ever see a long box chrewcab HD anymore so it isn’t going to benefit most people.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I rarely ever see a long box crewcab HD anymore”

      For SRW it is rare, but for DRW it’s basically the default configuration. DRWs aren’t especially rare around here although we are 3000 miles apart.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I own a CCLB SRW, although sample size of one yada yada.

        Ram doesn’t offer an extended cab and there’s likely not enough room under a regular cab for a tank that size. The 48 gallon in my F350 is physically massive, and mine doesn’t even have a DEF tank to take up additional room.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @ajla – most of the duallies I see in pickup form are for RV use since they aren’t useful for industrial use in my part of the world.

    • 0 avatar
      kkop

      Duallies with the crew cab and long bed are thick on the ground where I live, with a majority used to tow gooseneck and fifth wheel horse trailers.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        For work/commercial use, the single-wheel HD pickups can haul/tow more given the 26K lbs (combination) limit, before requiring a CDL.

        Even if technically safer, the rule makes “duals” dead weight. Yet RVs can go way beyond 26K with zero special training or licence.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          A DRW truck (for RAM anyway) has a 3000lb higher GVWR. If you’re putting especially heavy things in the bed that extra payload is good to have even if you aren’t hooking up to a trailer. And, you’ll still be well under a 26K GCWR.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            All three have about the same payload. But the dually bed is the limiting factor of impressive 6 or 7K payload, not to mention the wide track. Flatbeds increase the versatility of (not towing) DRW 1-tons, but they (as “tractors” technically) can go beyond the 65 ft ‘combined’ pickups are DOT limited to, meaning 48 to 53 ft goosenecks.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Appreciate the seeming trend toward body-color bumpers and trim this year. The chrome on pickups has been excessive for a long time and has really gotten out of hand recently.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @dal20402 – back in the day when chrome was chrome it was vastly superior to paint. I recall my dad attaching a sheet of plywood to the grill of his pickup with bailing wire when he towed it behind his gravel truck to protect the rad/paint and windshield. He never had a problem. I don’t recall seeing rust on any of his grills or bumpers. Even my 1990 F250 bumper was amazing for holding up to the elements.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      Dodge/Ram has been doing body colored stuff for a long time. The 1st Gen Rumble Bee, the SRT 10 were out a long time ago.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The early ’90s Lightning and Nite F-150s have them beat. It’s the only look I like on a truck, along with black matte trim, door handles, flares/lips, etc, too not over do the color-keyed.

        Chrome looks “cheap”. Too much has been put on pickups.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I still have much desire for a 1500 Classic in Warlock trim.

  • avatar

    fun stuff. how exciting for Ram dealers!

  • avatar
    kkop

    The cool colors only come out near the end of a model run. I personally loved the lime green/black and orange/black paint on the ‘Classic’. – if those came on the current model I’d be tempted to trade.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    Are they going to offer a factory-available urinal to go with those 50 gallon tanks? Never knew so many people were averse to gas stations. I can see if you’re in a remote location on a ranch or something, but typically, they’d have their own fueling systems anyways.

    As for the current trend of color-matched bumpers/grills… whatever. I’ll stick with chrome… it’s FAR more durable. Generational thang, I guess… like black wheels. Reminds me of high school, when we’d pop the hubcaps off & paint the rims black to look “tough”… what comes around goes around!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I know the feeling. We’d pop the hubcaps off the borrowed ’82 Ford Fairmont to go to Mexico for the long weekend, late ’80s, early ’90s.

      That thing was like the “Platinum Edition”, chrome up and down it, tu-tone brown/tan paint, power everything, mint condition.

      So I’d hose it wet then do donuts in the dirt, run it through some mud puddles at high speed, hit the wipers and we’re ready to go! You gotta fit in, down there as much as possible.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      The big gas tanks come in real handy when towing heavy and single digit MPG are not out of the question.

      The only downside is I’ve rediscovered the joy of $100 credit card limits at the pump that I remember so fondly from 2008 and 2011. At least this time I’m getting 40 gallons or so for my trouble.


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