By on September 10, 2019

On Monday, General Motors confirmed the 2020 Chevrolet Convertible will debut early next month. The official date will be October 2nd, giving Chevy a few weeks to build excitement. We wish them a lot of luck.

Beyond removing the materials typically located above your noggin at the press of a button, we aren’t absolutely positive what the automaker has planned — but we’re confident. Leaked details have suggested a hardtop foldaway design that axes everyone’s view of the engine compartment for added rollover protection. A handful of renderings even made it into the automaker’s C8 Corvette presentation this summer, briefly showcasing the safety humps and indicating there would a sufficient gap between them for the rearview mirror to do its job. 

The rest of the vehicle should be unchanged, however. We don’t expect Chevrolet to abandon the 6.2-liter V8 that already lives inside the Stingray, nor the eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox it’s mated to. Package offerings should also be more or less the same, too. That leaves the officially official debut (which will be official) to wow us with high-resolution images of the Corvette Convertible’s minor changes. Expect substantially less reward glass and maybe an added vent or two.

Chevy’s open-air flagship is believed to come in about 100 pounds heavier than a similarly equipped coupe. General Motors will likely have the official numbers for us in October, as well as the how many seconds it takes for the new clamshell to consume the roof.

 

[Image: General Motors]

 

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12 Comments on “2020 Corvette Convertible Reveal Scheduled for Next Month...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Just yesterday I was wondering when the convertible version was coming. I can’t wait to see how this is going to work.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      I’m guessing almost identically to the Ferrari 458 Spider. I keep getting this feeling that was the car everyone at GM was looking at when they started designing the new Corvette.

  • avatar
    MeJ

    To me, just like the previous generations, it seems redundant to offer a drop top on the Corvette. The Targa top is 90% of a full on convertible. I don’t see the point.
    But hey, to each his own…

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The C7 didn’t look good as a convertible, but I believe the C8’s profile will translate better as a convertible.

      The targa does get you 90% there, the problem is you have to remove it, but with the convertible you just push a button. I’ve removed the targa on my C7 about 4 times in a year, its kind of a bulky item thus not the easiest thing to do. On the plus side its very light, easy to unlatch and stows nicely in the hatch.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        I’d have to differ with that assessment. The C7 looks outstanding as a convertible – with the top down that is. Top up, meh…like most verts, they look way better topless.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Too much noise from the b pillars at speed on the targa. The ‘vert, while windier, is much less compromised that way.

  • avatar

    With the Volt and CT6-V facing cancellation, the Corvette maybe GM’s only world-class vehicle. Barra has just about cancelled all of GM’s interesting cars. Even the Camaro is not safe. Is GM future selling truck and SUVs with cheap interiors?

    Disgraceful!

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      We’ve been down this road several times before. They (car industry) builds a gaggle of interesting vehicles and then slowly kills them off. Fast forward 20+ years and they repeat.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    Oh good, a C8 convertible. That was quick.

    Like the Corvette needed another reason to kick the Supra’s ass.

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    This styling reminds me of an 80’s Ferrari. Which is a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      This is the first modern Corvette I’ve had any interest in. I know someone with a C7 and I’ve driven it. Very nice car but not “me”.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        You know, I felt the same way. As a “run silent run deep” kind of operative, the Vette was too much of an extrovert. But all the glowing reviews regarding the driving experience made me take the plunge. While that first year drew a lot of stares, much of that has faded. The driving experience, however makes it all worthwhile.


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