By on August 26, 2019

1996 Isuzu Hombre in Colorado wrecking yard, radio - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

Every gearhead reading (and writing for) this website enjoys the thought of a good road trip. One rule which should permeate all voyages decrees that passengers can complain about the type of music or its volume — but not both. This stems from my own belief that a person can complain about the brand or temperature of a beer given to you by a friend — not both.

Rarely do all hands agree, however. What’s your go-to music genre when hitting the open road?

Because I am actually twelve years old, it may surprise you to learn that this 6’6″, pickup truck driving, demolition derby winner enjoys listening to electronic dance music. There, I said it. Feels good to get it off my chest. Eric Prydz, Marshmello, and Martin Garrix all occupy space on my playlist alongside old-school deadmau5 and Skrillex. The beat keeps me awake for hours.

(We’re still processing this information and have not yet agreed on a firm but respectful course of action – Ed.)

On the opposite end of the spectrum, I once shared driving duties on a 14-hour trek with a person who perpetually listened to CBC News, claiming it kept his mind active because of the thoughtful topics being broadcasted. The dulcet tones of Anna Maria Tremonti and Michael Enright had the opposite effect on these ears, lulling me into a deep slumber. The station was quickly shifted back to SiriusXM 51 when it was my shift at the wheel.

How about it? When does your dial land on a road trip?

[Image: ©2019 Murilee Martin/TTAC]

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85 Comments on “QOTD: Your Favorite Road Tunes?...”


  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I’m not a huge AC/DC fan but they sure are fun to drive to. Or just about anything with a good hard rock beat.

    Of course I often dream of driving in the southwest listening to Dwight Yoakam – A Thousand Miles From Nowhere.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    No one particular genre, but any road trip where I am by myself requires a listen to Joni Mitchell’s “Hejira”. which consists of all travel songs.

    She pretty well sums it all up with the final cut, “Refuge of the Roads”.

  • avatar
    NoID

    I have a slate of cleverly-named playlists on Spotify, my two favorites for long drives are my full discography of Clutch and another I’ve made of cover songs.

    Long drives are also good for long-form lectures and podcasts, if I’m not feeling musical.

  • avatar
    Jon

    Silence, with road noise and engine hum.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      Purist.
      ;-)
      Some engines are just magical.

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        Yes. Rolling down the interstate while listening to a 460HP LQ9 sing its tune at 2400rpm is magical.
        But sometimes no music is necessary to make sure that your 200k+ Camry isn’t rattling itself to death.
        Or sometimes your kids aren’t in the car with you and its the only time for silence.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “rattling itself to death”

          My dad was a trucker and held the firm belief that when you sat behind the wheel, your job was to be attuned to the machine and not the radio.

          There are times when I’ll plug in the I-pod and let it run through my 1,700 song play list but I find that I’m starting to prefer no tunes at all.

  • avatar
    Menar Fromarz

    Oh, I alternate Cardi B with zen like spa music. It’s a great pick me up when I’m feeling too normal.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Being a 40 year old, I have realized I am completely stuck in time. The music I listen to is the same music I listened to during my Friday night dance party late 20s and early 30s.
    Call the genre what you will, indie dance rock is what I usually land one. Examples include:
    White Lies, Editors, Doves, The Sounds, Metric, Muse, Interpol, Kasabian, The Rifles.
    Though I also enjoy a bit of Electronica/electro-rock like:
    Ladytron, The Whip, Shiny Toy Guns, and – more modern, Grimes.

    Check out my playlist on Spotify: Indie Dance Rock of the 2000s if you want to know what we rocked out to in the mid to late 2000s club scene.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I’m also 40.

      My opinions on 90s music hasn’t changed since the 90s. I still like what I liked then, and the stuff I didn’t like hasn’t gotten any better.

      Except for Nirvana. They sound much different now, because I’m less naive about mental illness now then when I was 16. Practically every verse Kurt Cobain wrote just screams “get this guy to a psychiatrist before he kills himself!”

      The guy was a really good writer, though, which was easy to miss on the casete tapes I was listening to – Weird Al’s parody was spot on. The kids rich enough to have both a CD player AND a CD collection had a much different listening experience than I did.

      All of this came up because my 9-year-old was asking who Kurt Cobain was, after some YouTuber he’s obsessed with mentioned him or something.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        I don’t know why, but I was never really into Nirvana. I want to say it was because of the company I kept who degraded them as a power chord band. What I can’t explain was why I was so into Stone Temple Pilots at the same time.
        Cobain changed a generation and made it “ok” to be miserable. Other bands took that and ran with it, specifically one of my favorite bands of the late 90s and early 00s, Stabbing Westward. Any time I was depressed about some girl breaking my heart, I would listen to them and instantly feel 100 times worse. And I sought it out every time.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    Gotta be Shovels n Rope.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Love the picture of the old Delco head unit. Reminds me of the days when I would make mixtapes of all different kinds of styles or moods and give them (IMHO) clever names. Like “Mellow Majority”, “Deep Violet – Two Shade Beyond the Blues” and the ever classic “Gut Wrenching Rock N Roll”.
    Now-a-days it’s all on a series playlists on Spotify. But oftentimes, I just shuffle-play my entire list of liked songs. It’s interesting to hear “Walk” from Pantera immediately followed-up by “Adia” from Sarah McLachlan.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I don’t know any of the songs previously mentioned. :-(

    But then I am of a generation where on a Friday or Saturday night we would chip in and put $5 worth of gas into the car. Flip the air filter cover so it sounded ‘meaner’. And cruise up and down the main ‘drag’.

    The easy answer is to just put on the sound track to American Graffiti.

    Failing that:
    6) On the first nice summer/spring day of the year, something by the Beach Boys. Say goodbye to winter.
    5) Born to be Wild. Steppenwolf. Stereotypical and I find Easy Rider to be unwatchable now. But still this is iconic.
    4) Green Onions. Booker T and the MG’s. One of the great largely forgotten groups. 2 of its members appear in the Blue Brothers band. This song is the one in American Graffiti when they are going to the drag race.
    3) Roll on Down the Highway. BTO. A great way to start a road trip.
    2) Autobahn. Kraftwerk. Electric Eurotrash music. Wonderful at night on a two-lane highway.
    1) Radar Love. Golden Earring. Another European band. This is the ultimate driving song. Bar none.

    Honourable mention, just about any early work by The Boss.”I got a 69 chevy with a 396 fuelie heads.”

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      My favorite Booker T song is Hang ’em High – four minutes of Hammond heaven courtesy of Booker T. Jones. I think their best road song is Melting Pot, it has a really nice groove. I accept no responsibility for any speeding tickets gotten while listening to it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Honourable mention, just about any early work by The Boss.”I got a 69 chevy with a 396 fuelie heads.”

      That’s “Racing in the Street”. Springsteen has a whole list of songs you shouldn’t listen to during a mental health crisis, and that one’s right near the top of the list (I’d add the entire album “Nebraska.”)

  • avatar
    labelnerd

    I Can’t Drive 55 (or 65 or 75)!

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Ran out of ‘edit’ time (on my previous post).
    Matthew, CBC radio is my ‘go to’ station Your driver was right, keeping the mind active and learning while you are driving is a good example of multi-tasking. And I can’t stand the inane chatter of DJ’s on ‘popular music’ or ‘call in’ stations. But not a big Enright fan. For many years, would bring along my collection of Vinyl Cafe CD’s for long trips with my family.

  • avatar
    threeer

    If it’s a late-night, solitary run…Phil Collins’ “In the Air Tonight.” And if Boston’s “More Than a Feeling” comes on, the radio gets cranked high. Every. Single. Time.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Wheel

      Loved it when they played “In The Air Tonight” on Miami Vice when Crockett & Tubbs were heading out in the (fake) Daytona in the middle of the night for a showdown. Just watched it again on Youtube last week.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    All manner of metal, but depends on the type of driving being undertaken.

    Spirited driving – thrash – municipal waste, Havok, iron Reagan
    Long road trip – sludge – neurosis, high on fire
    Getting in the right headspace to go play sports – heavy and loud – goatwhore, 80s/90s death, obituary

    90% of the time I’m listening to sports talk radio, however, when driving locally.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    “What’s your go-to music genre when hitting the open road?”

    Discovered Trad Jazz and never looked back. It has built in wheels. Ragtime, Swing, Carolina Shag, Rockabilly, and of course Motown are also awesome, plus the usual suspects previously mentioned by others.

    :-)

    PS If you’ve got kids, I highly recommend Sharon, Lois, & Bram. Especially the Sing’n & Swing’n CD.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @PigIron, Yes Sharon, Lois and Bram. Know nearly their entire catalogue by memory. Anne Murray’s There’s a Hippo in My Bathtub was another favourite.

      Which demonstrates that the tune(s) may be conditional on the location/time/weather/companions/your emotional state.

      For example on a rainy night, Riders on the Storm by The Doors or Taxi (a forgotten classic) by Harry Chapin.

      Driving to or from or around Kingston Ontario or Ontario cottage country, you have to listen to The Tragically Hip.

      North of cottage country, Gordon Lightfoot is a must.

      On a wide open stretch of highway, CCR.

      Motown is never frowned upon in my car.

      And two Canadian driving classics are Tom Cochrane’s Life is a Highway and Crowbar’s (RIP Kelly Jay Fordham), Oh What a Feeling.

      When I started driving, the person running shotgun had a very important duty. Their job was to change radio stations fast enough that we never had to listen to a commercial. Easier with a push button radio, much more difficult without. But then we had 4 ‘top 40’ AM stations and 2 ‘progressive rock’ FM stations to choose from and later an FM station dedicated to disco/dance music.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        The Hip is also required for road trips anywhere in Western New York, aka the Hip’s home away from home.

        Actually like Rascal Flatt’s cover of “Life is a Highway” from the Cars movie soundtrack. Now that I mention it, Sheryl Crow’s “Real Gone” from the same soundtrack is killer…now that I mention it, the entire Cars soundtrack is great road trip music.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    If I am doing a whole album on a long trip it is likely to be a Tom Petty one. If I am doing my own playlist it will likely be heavy on Alice in Chains and that era. If I am in my truck which still has the SiriusXM subscription I’ll usually just put it on Lithium and let it ride. Sometimes I’ll do classic rock as well. Typically nothing recorded after 1998 will be played unless Dave Grohl was involved with it.

  • avatar
    6250Claimer

    Red Barchetta by Rush, while dancing through the Santa Cruz Mountains, is tough to beat. Close 2nd: the sound of the BMW S54 at full wail.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    For a long, relaxing drive… my go-to is Paul Hardcastle… or Satin Jackets.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I just can’t stomach commercial radio … For me its Sirius XM channel 25 or 26 …!

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’ve always been against paying for radio when it’s literally free, plus I pay for Apple Music which means infinite music. At the same time I hate commercials, I would rather sit in silence than sit through commercials. I have a habit that I developed when I first started driving of immediately scanning stations when commercials come on, it annoys passengers but commercials are like nails on a chalk board to me. I honestly can’t remember the last time I heard a commercial on the radio… maybe riding with someone else?

      So I bought vehicles with the Sirius trial, and well, they got me trapped in the monthly payment… for now. Turns paying to not have to hear those commercials is worth some peace.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The trick is to wait until *after* they disconnect you from the free trial, at which point the price drops every few days. I re-upped back in March for like $30, which covered me through late September. I’ll see what they offer for a renewal.

        Terrestrial radio is pretty much crap. XM is worth it, as long as the deal’s right.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Exactly this Mike, if you let it run out they will drop that price pretty low to get you back, my 6 months for $5 a month ran out and they’ve bumped it back up to $20 a month or however much it is, I’ll have to call back up and see what I can do.

        • 0 avatar
          MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

          I still prefer CDs, but in my newest vehicles that don’t HAVE a CD player, satellite is a must.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Honestly I’m not sure how long I will keep Sirius XM though, the DJs have a bad habit of talking too long and that’s what I’m paying to get away from. If XM doesn’t put some reins on that soon I may call quits.

        And actually the worst part about XM is that Alt Nation has that insufferable Madison chick that is like an assault on your senses, I don’t know how someone so horribly lacking of intelligence is held in a position where she’s a spokesperson for that channel. I change the channel whenever she talks for more than 5-6 seconds, unfortunately her unintelligible rambling can go on for what seems like 30 minutes at times.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          But it’s “Downtown” Julie Brown talking. I like that lol.

          Madison is fine on Lithium. I don’t really do modern alternative though because I’m not sure what makes it “alternative”. It sounds like modern pop, which sounds like fingernails on a chalkboard to me.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          I wish ALL the SiriusXM channels would go DJ free. I am paying for music not chit-chat. Sirius does solve the problem of what to listen to since their channels cover every possible genre. As high schooler in the 80s I tend to stick to 80s, 90s, First Wave & LL Cool J. However like the author I am an fan of EDM so BMP and Diplo occupy my presets.

          I’ve had Sirius for what seems like forever and love it! When I travel for work and get rental without it I just turn the radio OFF. Commercial FM is so horrible I’d rather listen to the wind coming thru the windows.

          And I too only pay $60 a year for SiriusXM and have it in all 3 of my vehicles. Every year my wife calls them to cancel unless they honor that price. They are under massive pressure with all these streaming services and unlimited data plans so they have to cut prices to stay in business.

    • 0 avatar
      ScarecrowRepair

      I was surprised to find that the old radio shows channel 148 is some of the best traveling music. It repeats every 12 hours with a two hour rotation, I think, and starts fresh every week, so it is limited. But some of them are good entertainment.

      For instance, Gunsmoke the radio show has William Conrad as the marshall. He is an excellent choice, except if you watched TV in the 60s, you will forever associate that deep voice with a certain short fat rotund private eye, and it’s very jarring even after you’ve heard a few dozen episodes.

      At least a good break from music once in a while.

    • 0 avatar
      6250Claimer

      Me too much of the time. Great lineup of DJ’s, with just the right amount of interaction – and zero commercials. Best of all worlds. My only dislike – too much of some of the staple artists, apparently due to either promotion by their record companies, lower royalties, or something.. Aerosmith, in particular, gets WAY too much airtime.

      Here’s the other SXM trick – they now include streaming with their lower-tier package, the one that’s easy to get for $30/5 months just by asking. If your car supports CarPlay or Android Auto, stream it instead of using the satellite stream. There are 3 bitrate options, and the highest is 320kbps – very near CD quality and MUCH better than the satellite stream. As long as your cell plan is unlimited, no worries. Sounds fabulous.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I have a 5 buck a month plan now. Last I saw though their app wasnt Android Auto compliant. 320K is as good as Spotify’s top tier. I will stream that but use lossless for any albums I actually care about.

  • avatar
    subuclayton

    1965. 21 years old. Driving through the Nevada desert en route from Ohio to LA in my 1959 Corvette with the 283 and non-synchromesh 3-speed. Hot time.
    “Summer in the City” by The Lovin’ Spoonful.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I just like something I can sing along with and want to crank up!

    Lately I’m a little obsessed with Midland.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ve been into ’60s lounge music, bossa nova and samba lately. Could be because remastered ’60s stuff sounds particularly good on my car’s sound system.

    Good stuff: youtube.com/watch?v=So718wk426c

  • avatar
    dal20402

    For local travel: nothing.

    For long distance: audiobooks. Normally I can’t stand them because they are so slow to convey information, but when you’re wiling away the hours on a road trip that turns into a good thing.

  • avatar
    readallover

    As a compulsive dial changer, I love XM. But whomever programs the Beatles Channel should be taken out and shot. You`ve got the greatest group of all time and it seems they are replaying Fab Forum on a loop with them droning on and on about somebody who once had a brush with fame with one of the Beatles. SHUT UP!!!!

  • avatar
    MeJ

    I start out road trippin’ to heavy metal. Metallica, Pantera. Black Label Society. Then when I settle in it’s more regular rock like Def Leppard, AC/DC, maybe some old Kiss.
    If I end up driving into the night it’s gotta’ be classic rock. Bob Seger, Elton John, CCR.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Tom’s top 3:

    1. Steppenwolf–Born to be Wild
    2. Aerosmith–Back in the Saddle (time it so there is lots of wheelspin and tire screech at the opening “I’m baaaack….”
    3. Sammy Hagar–I Can’t Drive 55 (the anthem of all freedom-loving motorists)

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    If I am going to drive, umm, aggressively I usually start with Cherub Rock by Smashing Pumpkins. Rocks start to finish and i will reflexively reach over and spin the volume dial clockwise. Back that up with early Nirvana (Bleach Album), and Soundgarden. Round it out with Mother by Danzig followed by Mother Mother by Tracy Bonham. Then I probably need to let the brakes cool.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    If anyone’s doing a trip alone through big sky country or the desert, I’d also recommend “Western Stars” by Bruce Springsteen.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I just connect my phone and randomly play the 8000 songs on the sd card.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Too late to edit, but no matter my favorites I like an eclectic sort with a lot of variety. I choose playlists that support that or like I said just put it on random and see what comes up.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    Australian country music is great. That same sound I grew up with, but without the ugliness that has become apparent in my native culture since 9/11/2001 and especially since 11/8/2016.

    I’ve taken a particular liking to Australian trucking ballads.

    It’s so familiar and, yet, just a little off to an American ear: “Bobby Diesel put down the hammer and headed down the highway.
    On about 3am, he pulled his Kennworth and four trailers into a little truck stop for some chow and 400 liters of diesel. Bobby had barely finished wiping the 300 klicks worth of roos off his rig when Smokey pulled up behind…”

    Anyway, I find this fun! The Australians get it, but they do it their way. I’m sure Australian country has its own cultural baggage for Australians, but it’s not my problem — so I can just listen to the music.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Nowadays, I don’t play anything on a highway trip.
    But when I was younger, much younger, and driving at night, I would listen to AM radio.

    With the proper Ionosphere propagation conditions, one would be able to listen to stations a thousand miles away. Fading and crackling, I would keep listening, regardless of content, until I could identify where from the signal had originated.

    This poor man DX-ing would keep me wide awake.

  • avatar
    relton

    I have the Bentley programmed to play “God Save the Queen” whenever I leave on a journey.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    If I’m driving solo and aiming to misbehave, something like Queens Of The Stone Age is ideal. It’s a little on the nose, but Songs For The Deaf is a favoured choice (it’s meant to emulate a late-night drive out into the desert, with fake radio interstitials between several songs), but 3’s & 7’s off Era Vulgaris probably should have gotten my license revoked at some point.

    Road trips tend to skew a little towards the CanCon – the aforementioned Tragically Hip, Sam Roberts, Joel Plaskett, my wife will put The Arkells on pretty much at the drop of a hat. Although if I go far enough away from home, I sort of enjoy listening to local stations, usually something either alt rock, or classic rock/catch-all 70’s-80’s-90’s stations.

  • avatar
    Big Wheel

    First Wave on channel 33 on Sirius XM until the free trial subscription expires. Then it’s back to my CD’s & iPod since there isn’t much to listen to on current radio except for some older stuff.

    ZZ Top’s “Sharp Dressed Man” (love the video with the Eliminator) & AC/DC’s “Whole Lotta Rosie” (check out the Youtube video for the Live At River Plate version) are automatic crank-the-volume.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    My musical preferences tend to lag by about 20-40 years.

    I’d have to say Genesis, CCR, Tom Fogerty, Eagles, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Aretha Franklin, Frankie Valli and similar, The Supremes, Dire Straits. What wouldn’t make the cut would be country and most hip-hop; they’re just my jam.

    A song that almost got me in trouble once was “Hot Rod Car” by CCR. I was jammin’ out and the next thing I knew I’d sped up to 95. At that point I casually let off the accelerator and put on my “nothing to see here folks” face. I know to use cruise control when that comes on.

  • avatar

    I like a mix of genres as I like most of what is out there with the possible exception of rap and what goes for country music today (pop music with cowboy hats). I used to make cassettes – originally 8-tracks, now CDs – of favorites that were a mix of all kinds of tunes. Back in the day I would record my vinyl onto 8-track and whatever album appealed stayed in the car for several weeks – Who’s Next, Tales of Mystery & Imagination/Edgar Allen Poe, Road Food, Blow By Blow, Notorious Byrd Brothers, I Stand Alone, etc. I do have favorite tunes to drive to – Peter Gunn Theme (Mancini original recording), Absolutely Sweet Marie (Jason & the Scorchers), Freeway Jam (Jeff Beck), Going to Mexico (Sy Klopps), Arrow (Phil Keaggy), Where’s the Walrus (Alan Parsons), Make It On Time (David Lindley & El Rayo X), Need Your Love (Hawks), Bullet Train (Lost Dogs), Face the Face (Pete Townsend), American Roulette (Robbie Robertson), Last Plane Out (Toy Matinee), Waiting for the Rain (Giraffe)among others. It’s always a mix when I load up the changer.

  • avatar

    I used to like listening to Word Jazz (Ken Nordine) back when it was on the radio. Beeker Street was good too – especially on the drive home from a gig.

  • avatar

    I also find AC/DC best suited for the road. And Metallica. And Saxons. And (drums) Bananarama. least suited: King Crimson, Yes, Procol Harum and list goes on. Absolutely unsuited is Schostakovich.

  • avatar

    Another my favorite song is “Deutsche Soldaten und die Offizieren”, esp when cruising on freeway. BTW it has nothing to do with Nazis in case you wonder just good marching tune.

  • avatar
    cicero1

    A few good driving tunes:
    Nightwish: Ghost Love Score
    Sabaton: Winged Hussars
    Delain: Here Come the Voltures
    Jason Adldean: Chillin on Dirt Road

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    On a long, lonely, dark highway, when you’re all by yourself at night, Robert Plant’s “Big Log” is downright freaky.
    On a congested Interstate expressway with 3+ lanes each way- for this you need White Zombie’s “El Phantasmo and the Chicken-Run Blast-O-Rama”, which is the only song I know that actually makes you drive more aggressively.
    On the street, cruising with your chums while scoping out the local “scenery”- The Gap Band’s “Humpin\'” or Beastie Boys’ “Looking Down The Barrel of a Gun”.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    As long as it is some form of rock and roll. Could be the Yardbirds or Metallica. Eagles, Skynard, Fireflight, Decyfer Down, Beach Boys, Weird Al. I like classical, but it would put me to sleep. I used to crank up Brazilian to 11 and take a nap. I don’t know why, but Phil’s staccato beat would put me out. There aren’t many Country songs I like, or Rap. Actually, I have a hard time saying Rap and music in the same sentence. Though I admit “Jesus Freak” is good, for Rap.

  • avatar
    essen

    Chuck Berry. Say no more.
    (“Dear Dad” is hilarious!)

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    I was at first excited by the possibilities of Sirius/XM; I thought, freedom from the computer generated playlists! Obscure cuts from classic albums, the songs never played/heard on the radio…but what did I get??? The same “Classic” songs in a rotation, aimless DJ chatter, etc. etc. The farce of “different” genres, yet recycling some of the same tunes across the spectrum. (IMO) It’s just easier to load a flashdrive with whatever ecletic mix you prefer and go with that, and you don’t have to pay for it!

  • avatar
    MWolf

    I’m sort of ecclectic. I like some classic rock, some 80’s stuff, some electronic..

    But I love driving to classic Bowie (“Suffragette City”, “Queen B****”, “Young Americans”), Led Zepplin, Lords of Acid, and NIN.

  • avatar
    55_wrench

    Bay Area brat here.
    The best road trips I had were to Texas (3x) Canada (2x) and Mexico (2x).
    Back in the day with one exception, all were driven in a ’65 Monza or ’63 Rampside.

    That 2.7 flat 6 with headers and 2 inch dual turbo mufflers made some wonderful music..

    But on that lonely stretch of road across Texas, nothing was better than

    Radar Love,
    Police’s Roxanne
    Boston’s first album,
    Frampton Comes Alive,
    Or
    ANY Emmylou Harris or Linda Ronstadt.

    I rode my avatar (KH400 triple, stock exhaust) to visit my grandparents in Truth or Consequences NM. I had a cassette deck inside a tank bag and that was fine, but the howl of the pipes when it got on its power band is something I miss to this day.

    • 0 avatar
      55_wrench

      (continued from last post) in Truth or Consequences NM in 1978.

      I had a cassette deck inside a tank bag , speakers inside my helmet and that was fine, but the howl of the pipes when it got on its power band is something I miss to this day.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Before we go any further, can someone please move that climate control knob one position to the right? Blowing large quantities (fan is on highest setting) of hot/warm air directly in one’s face is both uncomfortable and ineffective.

    Heat should come from below (or combined bottom and top, which the control pictured above does not allow for).

    The balance and fader control settings are interesting as well (budget for RR speaker replacement first).

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Looking further:

      – Is this a diesel model? There is a Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) setting.

      – I understand that many customers choose to have Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders in effect. But this vehicle makes that election automatically? This seems a bit presumptive.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Lots of good music here .

    Few of my vehicles have anything better than the stock unit, often AM only .

    The tappets and exhaust work well but gotta be careful not to get lulled to sleep .

    -Nate


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  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States