By on August 26, 2019

Ford’s Escape has become the bread and butter of many Blue Oval dealership across the nation, usurping Explorer as the default choice for most families that choose to wander onto a Ford lot in search of an SUV or crossover. Sales have routinely hovered around the 300,000 mark for each of the last eight years.

The 2020 rethink, complete with styling apparently inspired by a Salofalk suppository, brings a solid amount of skin to this cutthroat segment, deploying new hybrid tech and all manner of driver assist technology. Its build and price tool is now live, allowing us a peek at what it’ll cost the Smith family to trade up.

As you can guess, your author is not a huge fan of the Escape’s new styling direction, feeling it leans too much towards the 1996 Taurus (a car that was a tribute to the noble lungfish) and not enough towards the squared-off Explorer. I guess the upcoming Baby Bronco will take care of that in this size class. At least designers did away with Escape’s weird amber fog lamps that used to denote the base S model, a feature which used to loudly advertise the driver’s penny-pinching ways.

That entry-level model now starts at $24,885, a sum which represents a $780 hike over the 2019 base trim. That vehicle is only available with the 1.5-liter EcoBoost, making 180 horsepower. Last year’s S had the naturally aspirated 2.5-liter four banger good for 168 ponies. All manner of snazzy colors are available even on the S, including a nice Sedona Orange and Dark Persian Green for the weirdos. Adding all-wheel drive to this car siphons $1,500 from your bank account.

 

The volume SE starts at $27,095 with the SEL being a $2160 walk from that. For one’s extra cheddar, the SEL provides kit such as an foot-activated hatchback and reverse sensing system. Base engines up to this point remain the 1.5L, with the 2.0L EcoBoost being a $2,285 option on SEL only.

Titanium models, which feature a heads-up display that’ll surely be spoken of in every single Escape commercial for the rest of this calendar year, opens at $33,400 and tops out at $40,705 when every single box is checked.

CoPilot360 is standard on everything, bringing lane keeping and automatic emergency braking to the party, with CoPilot360 Assist appearing as an option on several other trims to pad your new car note by as little as $695. Those who choose it on the SE model, for example, will find themselves in charge of a car with adaptive cruise with stop-and-go. In some models, Assist is bundled with a spendy Premium package to include the likes of remote start, power liftgate, and an expansive panoramic roof.

An interesting new proposition is the $28,255 SE Sport Hybrid. It is powered by the 2.5L I-4 Atkinson-cycle mill paired with an electronically controlled continuously variable transmission and an 88 kW electric motor. The eCVT doesn’t turn my crank, but Ford’s efforts at normalizing the hybrid are commendable. They’ve packaged its liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery below the floor of the second-row seats instead of occupying a significant portion of the cargo area. The briefcase-shaped battery in the standard hybrid measures less than one-third the size of the old Escape Hybrid battery. In fact, cargo volume behind the second row drops only about three cubic feet compared to the gasser, from 37.5 to 34.4 cubes. This is good news. Expect around 200 horses from this powertrain. Again, all-wheel drive is a $1,500 proposition if you want it.

This fresh 2020 Ford Escape is scheduled to land in dealers sometime this Fall.

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

43 Comments on “Pricing Surfaces for 2020 Ford Escape...”


  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    I have a friend that has a 2020 Escape Titanium Hybrid on order for delivery in Sep based on dealer order guide. Ford has a 2020 Escape on display at the Minnesota State Fair. My friend came away disappointed. She wanted to like it but didn’t like the front end design or the interior (especially the shapes in the door panels). It was all ok IMO but I get where she found fault. The vehicle feels smaller than a CR-V or even CX-5, especially in the rear seats. My friend will cancel her order and be considering other options.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    The Ford ECVT is a terrific transmission for day to day use.

    it’s not sporty, but then neither is an Escape.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      I have a 2017 2.0T and I would disagree. As far as CUV’s go it is fairly fun to toss into corners. Fun enough to call it sporty.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        That’s good to know, the 3rd gen Escape with the 2.0T is still on my short list for next purchase

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        “As far as CUV’s go”

        That’s an important qualifier. My daughter has a 2017 Escape and I do agree it drives better than most, but even compared to my Fusion Energi it’s a more isolated driving experience.

        I did have a late model rental Rogue. It seems that Nissan did whatever it could to disconnect the driver from the road. It was roomy, though.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      True dat. “Ask the man who owns one,” as we do. I was put off by the descriptions of CVTs that leave the motor droning like a motorboat as you accelerate. My Ford C-Max makes that noise too, but not for very long. With enough HP (198) for an 8 second 0-60 time, you don’t hear that noise for very long. By the time I notice it, I’m reaching freeway merging speed.

      It’s worth noting that the Ford ECVT works differently, without belts or cones. Quoting an owner on fordfusionhybridforum, ”
      continuously variable transmission. No matter what is between the driving force and the output shaft, the end result is the same. The planetary gears do the job to the same effect as the sheaves, The Main reason for the gears is it makes a much more robust and stable transmission, less likely to wear, and can take more power input. Added benefit of the CVT, no clutches to wear out, no valve body to clog, and no torque converter to blow out. So in theory, as long as its kept cool and lubed, it will last far longer than any other transmission. The only time a planetary gearset has failed is either due to poor material quality, damaged due to something else failing and contaminating the lube, or over powering it. So the only thing that could potentially cause a failure is poor material quality. “

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Count me as a fan of this car’s styling – not because it’s particularly good looking, but because it’s not trying to BS everyone into thinking it’s a rough, tough off-roader. It’s a lifted family hatch with AWD, and that’s that the design says – nothing more, nothing less. It’s simple, clean and somewhat elegant. I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I’m not crazy about it, but I don’t mind it and also value the honesty. I just can’t quite tell if the shape comes at the expense of practicality. It doesn’t look good enough for such a tradeoff.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        Agree with both of you. This is literally the Focus, Americanized. The layers have finally been peeled off, and that’s why I like it. It does in fact mark a departure of sorts in the long transformation of the design of the Edge. So it will be really interesting to see customer reception of this generation.

    • 0 avatar
      Lichtronamo

      IMO, it’s only the front grille and headlamps that is an issue style wise. The rest of the body has a better shape than the CX-5. However, the slope of the D-pilar does cut into the cargo space and there did not seem to be an abundance of head room in the rear seat (this model had a panoramic sunroof which was how my friend ordered hers also).

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      It’s much better than what Honda and Toyota have been sending our way.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        No joke…I rented a new RAV 4 last week, and that thing was pretty much awful – ugly as hell and slow, obnoxious start/stop, and nannies that couldn’t be shut off. It was roomy and quiet on the highway, and got good mileage, which is the extent of the compliments I could give it.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Mike was that the new generation of Rav4 you tried out? Sad to hear Toyota’s getting into the start/stop crap too.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I drove RAV4s of both the last gen and this gen.

            The new gen is quieter, rides smoother, and feels heavier.

            The interior atmosphere has changed from exceedingly cheap to mostly cheap.

            I’ll let my wife sum up the styling: “Why is it so angry?”

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Brand new, gtem. You can defeat the start-stop, but you have to it every time you turn the car on. Entune also stunk.

            Plus, added bonus…the hood appeared to be misaligned.

            I’d have done a rental review if I’d had more time with it, but it I just had it for a day to run my kid up to college in. It sufficed – that’s about the best I can say.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          I hate the butch styling of this current gen; especially against the backdrop of the milquetoast powertrain options. I feel like this RAV4 is a big step back for the model. I miss the version that had the V6.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Agreed. Despite the obsolete 4-speed auto, the taffy-pulled RAV4 with the whomping V6 was a going concern. I liked the Tesla-powered EV version even more…but it was crippled by short range, high price, and Toyota’s refusal to adequately service what they’d sold.

  • avatar
    readallover

    With that grill and an oval badge, I first thought it was a KIA.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Not really a fan of the new styling. Too soft?? I don’t know, but for Mid $30’s for a well appointed Escape, you really open yourself up to a lot of alternatives. Which is where I usually find myself when ever I look at these compact crossovers. A few more grand and your are squarely in the crosshairs of much more desirable vehicles.

    10 years ago, if someone offered a 4 cyl hatch at $40 grand and it wasn’t some sort of factory rocketship, it would have been nailed to showroom floors. Somehow, add a few inches of ground clearance and the same hatchback is somehow flying off the shelf. Adjust for inflation and the same would hold true. The small crossover just doesn’t offer a lot of value IMO. What sort of power does the 2.0 ecoboost make anyway?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This, my jaw about hit the ground when I saw a base price of $25k for this, I can’t imagine actually paying that much, much less 35-40k to have a decently optioned version. It’s the modern Ford Pinto, only people are paying arseloads more for the privilege of being in a modern version.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Same argument can be made about anything in the dinky-CUV class, really – they’re ALL spectacularly overpriced.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        The only reason I balk at the loaded price is you could get a (as an example) 2020 Legacy Limited XT (the one with the turbo) for roughly $36K and that is if you offer to pay MSRP.

        This is why the small CUVs don’t make any sense to me.

        But I’m not the target market. When my wife bought her Terrain back in 2016 a conversation about how much sedan I could get her for the same money went NOWHERE.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The hybrid intrigues me. With leather and the panoramic moonroof I think this could be a worthy replacement for the MKX. I’m waiting for 1st year gremlins to be worked out and to see if the Corsair/Nautilus get better hybrid powertrains.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    I’ve had an 05 Limited and currently a 17 Titanium, and this new model will not grace my driveway. I don’t like anything about the exterior styling. But I really like the Lincoln version.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Reminds me of a Hyundai or Kia. My have the South Korean car companies have come so far when a Big 2 1/2 car company copies their designs.

  • avatar
    brettc

    I don’t think it looks bad. A little weird, but I drive a C-Max now, so whatever. I’d be interested in checking out the Hybrid option in a few years once Ford gets all the bugs worked out through a series of recalls.

    I really like that Dark Persian Green. It looks very similar to VW’s Great Falls Green metallic that’s available on the Alltrack.

  • avatar
    ronald

    I agree it looks good. It even looks like vision from the driver’s seat will be good. It seems like the trend for many cars was toward gun-slit type windows.

  • avatar
    TheDumbGuy

    It has the same grille as the Toyota TJ cruiser. Ugly on this car. Where is the chrome ? I take that back, it is FUGLY from the front. But my opinion is probably a minority one.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    It’s like they bought the stamping dies for the first generation Hyundai Santa Fe and then waited for the Hyundais to get scrapped before they reused them. It even still has the factory provided dents in the rear side doors.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Will be interesting to see how the hybrid version drives. They’ve bumped up the displacement of the gas engine from their previous crop of hybrids, but this is also a heavier car. Spec-wise it seems to be a near identical twin to the RAV4 Hybrid, but I think this styling is far more attractive than the RAV4’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      According to Edmunds/com, the heaviest 2020 Escape will be 200 lbs lighter than my C-Max Energi, but with similar HP. My C-Max is a heavy car, and it rides like one- smooth as a little LTD. But the suspension shows its Euro-tuned Focus roots. My C-Max lists a 0-60 time of 8 seconds, which is all I need.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I wonder if “heaviest Escape” Edmunds is listing includes the plug-in hybrid. If so, that’s quite the feat of engineering.

        I leased a C-Max Energi from 2016 to this past April, and quite liked the way it drove, although compared to my current Chevy Bolt it was quite an energy hog in EV mode.

  • avatar
    Kaplan

    Is it just me, or does the front end look like Ford styled it with a Peugeot and some tracing paper?

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    For it’s class it’s a fairly clean design. Just a modern wagon.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Terrible styling and overpriced.

    Definitely a step backwards just like the Explorer.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I think I’d have to see one in person to determine if the styling works. I tend to agree that the front end is a bit weird, but the rest is honest and simple.

    Am I correct in my recollection that the 1.5 is now a three cylinder instead of a 4? That’s the only bit that might give me pause, but then I have no experience with 3 cylinder engines and so have no reference point.

  • avatar

    I would rather buy CPO Lincoln Corsair rather than that generic Escape like unwashed masses will do. But I do not need SUV.

  • avatar

    Yet another post Fusion failure for Ford. What a disgrace!

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Did you not cover the Energi plug-in hybrid, or is that coming later?


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Art Vandelay: The 2 that stick out to me as practical options based on what is out there would be the Fit SI as...
  • Art Vandelay: As Ford is fond of “Retro” editions like the Mach 1 and the Bullitt, I was going to suggest...
  • Art Vandelay: I am praying for this. I love my Fiesta ST but it will need replaced one day and the Fit seems the best...
  • Art Vandelay: I have been screaming for this but regular cab, nice interior and Lightning badges. You may want the...
  • Art Vandelay: The Jetta GLI can be had for cheaper than the GTI and in it’s current form is more alike than...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States