By on August 15, 2019

When General Motors debuted the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette, the automaker promised it would start below $60,000. It’s just barely been able to keep that promise at $59,995, which incorporates the obligatory $1,095 destination charge, but it’s still an impressively low target for a mid-engined performance vehicle. You can, of course, option out Chevy’s C8 Stingray to a much higher price tag.

Fortunately, even if you go absolutely mental on the options, you’ll still be saving yourself some cash vs any of the Corvette’s chief rivals. For example, a bare-bones Porsche 911 starts at $98,750 while the Corvette has to move up two trim levels and take on loads of extras before it surpasses $80,000.

The C8 also comes equipped with a 6.2-liter V8 putting down 490 horsepower and 465 lb-ft of torque. Porsche’s 3.0-liter turbocharged flat-six only makes 379 hp and 331 lb-ft in its base configuration. By the time Chevy customers can easily outspend Porsche loyalists, GM will probably offer the C8 with a beefier engine and Z06 badge, which will no doubt undercut the 911 Turbo.

However, rather than prognosticate on how the new Stingray will continue to remain dirt cheap vs its European rivals, let’s examine what Chevrolet is actually offering. Starting with the $59,995 base 1LT model, customers receive the aforementioned 6.2-liter V8, eight-speed dual clutch automatic, LED headlamps, 8-way adjustable seats, automatic climate control, rear parking sensors, a 10-speaker Bose sound system, 12-inch digital gauge cluster, and an 8-inch infotainment screen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The $67,295 LT2 trim adds a 14-speaker Bose audio system, heated/vented seats with a memory option, front-mounted camera, navigation, power-folding mirrors, satellite radio, colorized head-up display, and a performance data recorder. It also opens up the door for new color options. 12 different hues can be applied to the car’s exterior, with six seatbelt colors (each of which cost $395) and the same number of interior themes.

LT3-trimmed Stingrays incorporate leather-wrapped doors and instrument panel, suede trim and fancier GT2 seats done in Napa leather. You can continue adding suede and carbon fiber for more money, too, but the base LT3 starts at $71,945.

That makes the LT2 the most robust platform to build from if you want the perfect affordable supercar. Yet even base Corvettes can take advantage of the $5,000 Z51 package. That adds Michelin PS4 summer tires, a performance exhaust system, more hardcore FE3 suspension, upsized brakes, a limited-slip differential, improved engine cooling, and larger spoiler. Magnetic ride control can be added for another $1,895.

If you want the big wing by itself, it’s $1,150. Meanwhile, the performance exhaust can be had as a standalone (adding 5 hp, according to GM) item for $1,195. The front lift-kit system is exclusive to LT2 and LT3 trims and adds $1,495 to the final price tag. Special brake caliper colors are all $595 extra while adding racing stripes or dressing up the engine with an appearance package (red and silver) adds about a grand each.

However, the biggest-ticket options are easily the carbon fiber pieces. You can add the material to just about every inch of the car’s exterior and pay a premium for doing so. If you just want the mirror caps, you’ll spend $1,145. But it will take nearly $10,000 to do the entire exterior.

This is, of course, just for starters. Chevrolet hasn’t announced all of the paint/wheel pricing and we know it’s bending over backwards to provide “an unprecedented level of personalization” with the C8. It wouldn’t be impossible to option the mid-engined coupe well beyond its $59,995 starting price. But, even if you did, you’re likely still walking away having spent less than you would have anywhere else. Just don’t expect dealers to be as a kind as the factory, they’ll be issuing markups anywhere they can.

[Images: General Motors]

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62 Comments on “2020 Corvette Stingray Pricing Revealed...”


  • avatar
    R Henry

    Despite my dislike for GM and its products, I wish them luck with this new C8! I hope the make lots of money with it, and keep the assembly plant in Bowling Green, KY, and all its NA suppliers, humming with prosperity. We all win if that happens!

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Heaven help me, I’m liking the C8 more and more. I’m generally critical of GM products, and before now the only Corvette I’ve liked is the C4.

      But more than anything, I applaud GM’s willingness to take some risks with its flagship product.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Whooooooooooooo somebody else admits liking the C4!

        I was born in 1977 and I’d love a C4 from 1996 with 6 speed manual. My wife was born in 1983 and can’t stand the C4 (and she professes a love of all things Corvette.)

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Heck yeah I’d own a C4! But I’d yank the V8 in favor an SVO 2.3, stroked to 2.5 and 500 reliable HP tuned. Normally I’m a V8 lover but this chassis is too good. Moving the center of gravity as far back as possible would make all the difference in the world, plus weight reduction.

          If I became a millionaire, I would not have a couple million dollars cars locked in a temperature controlled vault.

          No Sir, I’d have a barn full of bastardized monstrosities with with no limits (within reason). I don’t care who I anger. A mud bogger 911 Turbo with f/r engines? Yep. 1,000 HP IROCz? Yep Yep!

          Like I always say, money is wasted on the rich. I’ve been hoarding a T-Bird 2.3 T-Chicken for a while and now I know why.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          A C4 with an LS/6 speed swap might actually be better performance bang for the buck than a c8. I love them too. The ZR-1 may as well have been a Space Shuttle to young me.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Despite my dislike for GM and its products, I wish them luck with this new C8! I hope they make lots of money with it, and keep the assembly plant in Bowling Green, KY, and all its NA suppliers, humming with prosperity. We all win if that happens!

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Bookies, drug dealers, ex-wives and baby mamas rejoice! You’re all gonna get well on the ridiculous amount of dealer markup generated by the first C8s to hit dealer lots.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    At this point, I am convinced this car is a game changer in the sports car realm. This forces all the builders to explain their pricing beyond ’cause we can’.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    So is it now acceptable to call this car Kate? As in, C8?

    Kate is one [email protected] ride. A real sumday ride.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I’m not quite sure why it is more expensive to build a mid-engined car on an assembly line (note the Fiero was not a $60k car). There is nothing exotic about this car – the engine is moved from one location to another and the costs of development are spread over 30k plus units per year. What will be surprising is if you can even order and buy a $60k Corvette – my vote is not gonna happen with greedy GM dealers padding the sticker.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      The Fiero was priced similar to other cars in its class.

      Remarkably, the C8 Corvette isn’t priced much different from the C7.

      But the C8 is no comparison to the Fiero, or any other sedan. Its lighter weight requirement means more exotic materials and processing, and the structural demands for a 400+ HP drivetrain are substantial. Plus, it needs to handle safely and handle well, so you have to build in extra provision for that. The cooling system and HVAC are other big challenges.

      I’d also bet that GM made provision for a battery pack to hybridize the C8 with someday.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The Fiero was a Citation platform built with a Chevette suspension. It’s not like they can build the Corvette off a Malibu, although it might be very interesting. The original MR2 was a Corolla platform.

      I can’t believe the C8 can be profitable under $100K. At least not without printing 100K units a year. It might take $150K. The Corvette line doesn’t exist to show a profit. It’s a loss leader, just like most halo cars, especially when they don’t share a platform and or assembly line or even assembly plant with everyday, high volume autos.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      18 months from now all ADM will be gone – and some dealers will undercut out of the gate. Who goes into the dealer and negotiates these days. Internet baby — and I’d fly 1K miles one way to buy a C8 sticker and drive it home. At these price points, I’d pay sticker with a smile on my face.

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        ^ This. Everyone decries the ADM but the Chevy dealers will get it – for awhile. All the new “whiz-bang, wow” cars get ADM at first but it always goes away.
        I remember when the PT Cruiser first came out. My wife and I actually looked at buying one. The dealer had taken the Monroney and hidden it in the glove box. They were asking 10k over the sticker price! Needless to say we didn’t buy one

    • 0 avatar
      SirRaoulDuke

      You really compared a crap platform car to a C8 Corvette? Are you on the right website?

      • 0 avatar
        brn

        The G2 Fiero was a pretty neat little car.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It was too little, too late. The Fiero had already burned its reputation, literally, thanks to engine fires. The “Fiery” was a better name for it, and its cheesy parts-bin build was no help, nor its 3-speed auto, no overdrive/lockup. Shame too.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            Auto? I forgot it even had one. I’ll agree with you there. You’re also correct on the parts bin comment.

            Otherwise, neat little car with a lot of potential. GM cancelled it too soon.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          The Fiero desperately needed the quad 4 H.O.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It was a sabotaged hack job, but it’s GM we’re talking about. The base ’85 MR2 had a sweet 16 valver with an 8,000 rpm redline (fuel cutoff at 8,200. Don’t ask me why I know), crisp short-throw 5-speed, Recaro style seats, Goodyear Eagles, to name a few. Toyota did it right. GM is GM.

    • 0 avatar
      GregLocock

      Give that man a stuffed toy. It isn’t. If you think about it a mid engine car is just a longitudinal engine with a transaxle. Citroen and Renault both had those as FWD cars, and they did not sell at a premium. There is no part in a mid engined car that is intrinsically more expensive than the equivalent in a RWD. Yeah the transaxle might cost a bit due to lack of volume I suppose.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    The current Corvette was the first Vette that blew me away. This one is off the charts, and I’m saying that as someone who has no respect for GM.

    You can tell when GM wants to build something good. Trucks, large SUVs and this. Maybe the Volt as well.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Same here. I bought a C7 because the tech and engineering is excellent, but they finally fixed the interior so the C7 was acceptable for a GM product. The C8 just raises the bar.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Holy screaming deal Batman. $59K and change plus $5K for the Z51 package?!?!

    $72K for LT2 and Z51???

    Hate all you want, this is going to sell and at base vs base, the Supra is utterly irrelevant.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My current C7 is a Z51 3LT (mag-ride with the manual) but yeah what you want is 2LT + Z51 + Mag-ride.

      Do NOT… I repeat do not buy a Corvette without the mag-ride and performance exhaust those two things complete change the vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “but yeah what you want is 2LT + Z51 + Mag-ride.”

        I really don’t think I want the fancy shocks. I’m also not spending $74k on any car. At that price a $49K Supra or $40K Mustang becomes relevant

        I live where the roads are smooth and I’m never going on a racetrack with turns. What makes magneride a “must have”?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If all your roads are glass-smooth, then maybe you don’t need it, but I’ve never been anywhere in the US like that. Magnetic shocks give you roll stiffness, body control, and a compliant ride all at once.

          If I ordered a C8 I’d get the magnetic shocks without a single question. I’d have to think about Z51. I want the limited-slip diff, but I don’t really care about anything else in it, actively don’t want the big wing, and $5K is an awfully expensive limited-slip diff.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Z51 option is completely worth the $$ for the bigger brakes + exhaust. The exhaust sound alone is worth the 5k.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            If you listen carefully to the C8 intro the sub 3 sec 0-60 was Z51 specific. So if its like Z51 package on the C7 they are using different gear ratios (and maybe rear end too?) to reach that number.

            And yeah the mag-ride allows the car to go from comfortable GT cruiser to on-rails track beast with a twist of a dial. I liked it during the test drive but after having my C7 for a year now (daily driver and occasional track day) its honestly the best part of the car after the 460 HP V8.

            Suspension feel is very personal and its totally integrated into the chassis design so you can switch out dampers and springs or you can just twist a knob and get a completely different feeling car. Its amazing tech that I totally swear by now.

            FYI – you can get mag-ride on the Mustang as well.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’m not going to drive it on the track, so the standard brakes would be fine. The exhaust is available separately for much less.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Z51, mag ride, and NPP exhaust are essentials to really unleash your car. I could not see ordering a Corvette any other way. If you just like the looks and would drive it like a Camry, well then the Z51 would be overkill.

          • 0 avatar

            I had the CTS-V for a day or so. It totally sold me on the adjustable suspension. I’d not buy a new Vette without it.

          • 0 avatar
            jh26036

            They all have limited slips. You don’t get a fancier eLSD (still mechanical) one if you stay base.

      • 0 avatar
        Michael S6

        For my own curiosity sake, does anyone drive a Corvette as a daily driver in midwest winters ? I see plenty of Mustangs on my drive but never a Corvette.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Also, I think the LT2 is a must for the front lift-kit which is super cool with it’s memory feature.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Agree with that. My driveway is steep enough that I doubt I could get a C8 into my garage without using the lift.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Well, 2LT+Z51+magneride+front lift is going to be out of my price range.

        1LT+magneride+exhaust is $63K. That’s doable.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Wait about 2 years and these will be available for thousands under sticker.

          Even if the roads are glass smooth and you aren’t going on track, you can have a lot of fun with mag ride even on an onramp. I wouldn’t buy a GM performance vehicle without it.

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    A full carbon fiber exterior from the factory for $10,000.00? That’s a bargain!

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    As a Gm investor I’m concerned they will be losing money on every sale.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      As a GM investor, why are you concerned about maybe losing money on 30k cars?

      A tiny sneeze in full size truck and SUV sales has more of an effect on GM’s bottom line than doubling Corvette sales.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Profitability is overrated. Especially at GM. But after all our tax dollars invested, GM finally builds a car we can use.

      It’s a whole lot better than losing billions on Cobalts, Volts, etc. Wouldn’t you say??

  • avatar
    thelaine

    If it turns out to be what it appears to be, and is reasonably glitch-free, it is GM at its very best. The template is to put a team together and, as much as possible, leave them the fk alone. Ford does this with its pickup team. It has worked pretty well.

  • avatar
    SharkDiver

    The Forum Dealers on Corvetteforum.com have been selling the C8 for MSRP, although first year production is essentially sold out at this point. I ordered my current Vette from a Forum Dealer in New Hampshire for FAR less than local dealers would sell for, and had the factory drop ship it to a local dealer in Colorado. The local dealer charged me $400 to receive and process the drop ship.

    I will be ordering a C8 ZO6 once they are introduced and have been out for a year or two, and will use the same drop ship process again. You can currently get up to 15% off remaining C7’s from Forum Dealers if the current model is more your thing. And the idea that GM is selling the C8 at a loss is laughable…Not sure where that pearl of wisdom came from.

  • avatar
    Sid SB

    LT2 + Z51 pack + magnetic ride control

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I love this new Corvette. I am all about Toyota, Honda, and Porsche. Add the new Corvette, the Tahoe, and the F150 to this list. Three American vehicles I really like. Good job GM. I hope the F150 continues to be a desirable vehicle. I almost bought one, but the deals were terrible. So, I have a Tacoma … much much cheaper.

  • avatar
    RSF

    Yeah I really like this also. I suspect it will take some time to get the bugs sorted out by GM, but in the long run it will still be more reliable and more usable than the other supercars out there.

  • avatar
    Crashdaddy430

    I’m happy that gm will put a mid engine sports car in my garage for less than 100k. What I have a problem with is the styling. For what it is i expected it to look a lot, cooler. It’s not completely terrible, but neither does it have a since of drama to it. IMO, it looks like a car that would be made for a movie if they couldn’t use an actual production model for legal reasons or something. The nsx has the same problem, for a mid engine sports car I find it as exciting to look at as a slice of wonder bread.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    My third try at the Chevrolet dealers to try to order one and turn on the same, sign up and go on a waiting list and when you name comes up, we will call you, do not call us! You have to place a $1.5K-$3K deposit and a fill out a purchase agreement too. They say that their allots are all filled out for the entire 2020 year. That sucks!


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