By on July 30, 2019

2020 Cadillac XT6 Sport

The internet was awash with reviews of the Cadillac XT6 on Monday, with our own Tim Healey being of the mind that it is “pleasant yet forgettable.” In a sea of three-row crossovers, any new machine — no matter the brand — needs to have a killer app in order to stand out.

What form does that take for you? Prodigious power? Let-them-eat-cake seats? I think there’s one item in particular that would allow the XT6 to pole vault most of its competition … and Cadillac already has it in its parts bin.

Super Cruise, GM’s excellent foray into the world of semi-autonomous driving, is a piece of kit that works exactly as advertised in terms of shepherding a vehicle into its lane while significantly reducing driver fatigue. On the CT6 sedan, it was tremendous.

Trouble is, fewer people buy sedans than crossovers, meaning the technology isn’t being experienced by the masses. The segment in which the XT6 competes is brutally cutthroat, so a killer app is needed to stand out. Super Cruise would have provided that for XT6, just like enormous horsepower figures will do the trick for Aviator later this year.

To be fair, the chief engineer for XT6 told your author in DC that they are working on Super Cruise for this application and will roll it out in due course. Until then, we’ll wait for the quarterly sales numbers to see how XT6 does in the marketplace. Note well: he also told us that Super Cruise cannot be retrofitted.

What’s your killer app in a new car? Y’know — the one which makes you forsake all other competitors in its segment? Power, space, price … you tell us.

[Image: General Motors]

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82 Comments on “QOTD: What’s Your Killer App?...”


  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    If I’m paying for AWD, it had better be excellent. If the little Kia Sorento can do it, why can’t prestigious Cadillac XT6?
    >:/

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      GM’s Twin Clutch AWD with torque vectoring is a very good one too. We have a similar setup in our 2018 Regal TourX. The 31-33 mpg daily commuting and almost 40 mpg at 65 mph is icing on the cake.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        Maybe, but I don’t trust dry DCTs for towing, and I want to see some independent AWD traction tests too. My son’s Sorento can get to winter job sites that common SUVs/CUVs can’t (GM/Toyota/Honda). Regardless, Enclaves seem to hold their value crazy well here.
        :-)

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Ahhh, but if you want a Cadillac for towing specifically, thy name is Escalade. Don’t forget the BOF offering that most don’t have.

          Likewise, if I was at the Lexus dealer and I was towing, thy choice would be BOF.

  • avatar
    jtk

    This isn’t exactly what you asked, but I’m more interested in a competent overall experience than one specific thing. For example, I like the sportishness of my current Mazda, and the MPG is pretty good, but it could use better seats and more noise reduction. So for my next car I would look for the same qualities I have in the Mazda plus those.

    I have never succeeded yet. There is always something that’s not quite up to snuff.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Isn’t that the most frustrating thing? I have a 2015 Mazda6 and the noise and general squeaks/rattles make the car feel cheap. I want something quiet and solid-feeling. And cars that people *call* quiet and solid, like a Golf or a Fusion, are still too noisy to me.

      So I’m gonna say for me a car that’s quiet and has excellent visibility is my white whale. I just drove my aunt’s 2002 Camry and I never would have thought that car would feel like I was driving a fishbowl, but the difference is staggering.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Is your Mazda a manual? Change the transmission fluid to BG products SyncroShift II. It will shock you how much quieter your car will be. It’s expensive stuff, but most likely you’ll only need two quarts and almost certainly no more than three. I wish I’d done it the day I got my Civic Si instead of a decade later. I’d always assumed it was thin insulation and road noise that gave the car its reputation for being loud.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Luxury, I wish Cadillac would go back to being a luxury brand, Lincoln finally figured it out, or at least they’re trying, why not Cadillac?

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Cadillac absolutely succeeded at being a luxury brand 10-15 years ago in the sense that they figured out how to make large sporty cars. But hardly anyone interested in a Cadillac wants something that can go toe-to-toe with a BMW. Now they’re building “nice” vehicles because American luxury is supposed to be about comfort and not substance, but they’re in trouble because GM system-wide has cheaped out on car interiors.

      I wouldn’t say Lincoln has figured it out, though, just because they have some opulent-looking SUVs now. The Continental is just a few years old and was a colossal misfire. But again, with Lincoln, it won’t matter how those SUVs drive at all. Lookin’ fancy is all you need for American luxury.

      • 0 avatar
        cprescott

        Cadihack has not succeeded 10-15 years ago. They’ve had above average engines and handling platforms but they have phoned it in on exterior design and interior materials and design. It is odd that a company that spends so much time on the performance half steps on every other detail. And Cadihack has been in a slow decline for over half a decade.

        While you say the Continental is a “colossal misfire” that is depending on how you measure the situation. The Continental was really the first of the new Lincolns and they did waste the effort on a car, but this is no misfire in luxury or style – it was a precursor to the new Lincoln and for that it was a huge success. And with Lincoln now investing time in segments that matter (points to Cadihack and laughs at their insistence on cars), there is simply no comparison when looking at interiors between a Lincoln and a Cadihack. Even Hyundai and Kia on their new SUV’s is superior in every way to a modern Cadihack. Unless you want to coachbuild your Cadihack and spend the money to do so, you are better in a Lincoln or in the low rent Kia’s and Hyundai’s.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Those of you who deliberately make derisive puns out of automakers’ brands must think you’re very clever…especially when you do it more than once in the same comment.

          • 0 avatar
            King of Eldorado

            Kyree — I wish this site had a “like” button for comments. As a Honda guy, I’m especially bugged by the totally baseless “Honduh.”

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I agree, Kyree, unfortunately cprescott’s very valid points were lost with the over use of “Cadihack”. For a moment there I thought Deadweight had taken on an alternate personality

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          cprescott a.k.a. DeadWeightLite

  • avatar
    jack4x

    >8 cylinders.

    There is literally no vehicle I wouldn’t consider if it came so equipped.

    More realistically, the answer is natural aspiration. Turbos are fine, but when everything is turbocharged there’s nothing special about it. A good NA engine is still the gold standard for me.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This, it’s what sets the apart the boys from the men. Your either a competent American luxury division or your an also ran. In an age where we can get nearly 30 MPG from V8 cars the fuel economy argument is more out of date than the ox cart it came in on.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “the fuel economy argument is more out of date”

        I think it is more because of displacement taxes and regulations in other countries than strictly due to “fuel economy”.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Similarly, I won’t buy anything that’s not a V8. Or it has to really impress. Historical examples are MR2, SVO, GNX, X19, Fiero, XR7 and a couple others.

      There’s no real reason not to “V8”, especially when talking 4,500+ lbs SUVs, Wranglers and such, or so called “luxury”.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        While I love a good V8 as much as anyone, my killer app was MORE than 8 cylinders. There are enough V8s out there of varying quality that I can’t say I’d automatically consider anything with one.

        I can’t really think of a bad V10 or V12 though. Maybe the 2V Triton.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I’ve seen more Vipers than I have Dodge Ram HDs with the V10. Did they sell many? I see Triton V10s quite often, usually with horrible issues relating to ejected spark plugs, cracked exhaust manifolds, failed timing chain tensioners, bad coils, and broken exhaust studs on the engine blocks. Tritons are the Fordiest Fords of them all, but they’re still common everywhere except in working condition in junkyards.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            The V10 Dodges used to be reasonably common in the Midwest, but by now the youngest are old enough to vote and the vast majority have rusted away. Even Cummins trucks from the 90s are basically gone now. Never heard a bad word about the V10 itself though.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          I’ll take the worst V8 over the best V6.

          edit: American V8

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      I’m with you on the NA point, Jack. In fact, it doesn’t even have to be a V8. I think the ’18 Passat GT, Lexus GS, Regal GS and even the Toyota Avalon have an appeal that their competitors lack, and it’s the linearity of power delivery compared to turbo engines.

      I rented a high trim Fusion last month with 1k on the clock, and while I appreciated the new car smell and nice infotainment, it’s engine was unpredictable and driving nannies interfered with how I drive.

      It was the odd-feeling EcoBoost that soured me a bit on the Fusion, even though I kind of liked the rest of the car.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Agree.

        I’m more likely to make an exception to my policy for a turbo 6 over a V8 than I am for a turbo 4 over a V6.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          The problem is trying to find a V6 in a compact crossover/SUV, they just don’t exist anymore

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            The Blazer is actually smaller inside than a CRV. It isn’t priced like a compact, but it’s no more useful than one.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            US market automakers are following EU regs/standards/emissions when they don’t even what the fuk they’re doing.

            Next the EU will adopt CARB and “Knight” Mary Nichols!

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The Cherokee (nonGrand) still offers a 271hp 3.2L V6. With a 7.0 0-60 time, it isn’t a rocket but it is acceptable & it feels better than many 4-cylinders.

            The big win on the Cherokee is that there is *no paywall* to get the V6. It is a standalone option available on the base version. With every other manufacturer you have to step up several trim levels to get added power on a CUV.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            When I was mentored as a teen, the commandment went something like “Thou shalt select 8 cylinders if 8 cylinders are available, because they shall provide adequate power when needed but loaf effortlessly the rest of thine time behind the wheel, offering thee increased durability and reliability all thy days upon the earth.”

            Since that time, there have been some very nice relatively large-displacement V6 engines introduced.

            I have one 4-cylinder in the current family fleet (hangs head). One V8 and three V6’s.

            Fleet is 100% Normally Aspirated – like God intended.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    As jtk alluded to, it’s about competency for me. I want the vehicle to perform its “stated” mission very well. Of course every vehicle is a compromise to a certain degree, but I don’t like the ones that are “master of nothing.”

    ie – I prefer my 4X4s to be rugged and have the ability to do some serious offroading. I prefer my luxury cars to be, well, luxurious with powerful torquey engines. And sports cars should be concentrated on speed and handling, not luxury.

    I find most CUVs as “masters of nothing” – ie, they can’t handle, they usually aren’t luxurious, and they don’t have the offroad chops I would prefer. And they aren’t as good as moving people as a minivan.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Engaging handling and acceleration. After 5 years of driving a 3 row crossover that was competent but about as engaging as an autonomous transportation pod I have come to the conclusion that I need to be able to take curves at far over the posted suggestion, I need to feel a bit of visceral in the acceleration. I don’t need a Hellcat or an RX-8 (in the handling department) but I need to be more engaged than roughly 90% of my fellow man.

    Drove my in-laws Acadia Limited this weekend (you know the gigante first gen) and it made a mid 80s LeSabre Estate seem like a “driver’s car”.

    • 0 avatar
      d4rksabre

      Funny you mention the Estate as a driver’s car. I know it’s tongue in cheek, but a few years back when I was driving a TDI Golf we went to visit some friends and my friend’s wife drives a 95 Caprice Wagon as her summer car. She was absolutely tearing up the back country roads at speeds that I didn’t dare match in my Golf. Those old boats might have body roll for days but they stick to the road pretty darn well.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @d4rksabre – I enjoyed burying the needle more than a few times on B-body wagons. Best combo of ride and handling for me was the Pontiac Parisienne wagon.

        @quaquaqua – I think that’s why I’m OK with modern turbo charged engines as long as they put out the kind of numbers you’d expect out of an engine one size class up (4 cyl with V6 power, V6 with V8 power etc) because when the turbo spools up things move very quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        Aqua225

        Buick experimented with a Estate GNX back in the day. I do not remember the magazine, but it was probably either “Turbo Magazine”, Motortrend, or Popular Science/Mechanics. It would have been in the late 80’s.

        I remember the special story because they had a picture of a fake wood sided Estate doing a burnout of epic proportions at the time. The article read something like, “3.8L Turbo V6 to be in the Estate wagon?”.

        I always kept looking at Estate wagon articles, hoping that the vaunted 3.8L V6 Turbo would make an appearance. Probably the only wagon I could stomach. I am not a wagon fan, unlike many TTAC’ers who want everything with a straight shift and wagon combo option package.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Unfortunately, a side-effect of modern engines is that they accelerate so much more smoothly/quietly, you don’t get that visceral acceleration feeling anymore. My mom’s Pontiac G6 (OHV 3.5L V6) went from 0-60 slower than my Mazda6 (2.5L i4), but the G6 felt SO much faster because it had that noisy growl any time you so much as breathed on the pedal. But my dad’s V6 Camry gets up to 85 so silently when I merge on the expressway, it catches me off guard every single time.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      I agree, though I would basically summarize it as “responsive controls with good feedback”. It’s my job to drive; it’s the car’s job to let me drive and do what I say. If it’s bad at that, it’s a bad car. This applies to the steering, the brakes, the accelerator, the instrument light dimmer, the radio volume and tuner, the HVAC settings, the power windows, the locks, the seats, and everything else.

      If I have to try more than once to accomplish anything, the car is basically dead to me. I am willing to learn how a control operates, but when operated in the prescribed manner, it had better work as described.

  • avatar
    gfurry

    Carplay – It isn’t the best but it is nice to go from car to car and have the same interface. It is also nice that it works in cars as old as my 1999 Mazda (with upgraded stereo) as well as my newest car. It is also nice to get upgrades with iOS at least once a year as opposed to never or via paid updates via the manufacturer.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      Similarly for me Android Auto. It has it’s quirks and needs some bugs worked out in it’s implementation in the car I own, but I wouldn’t even consider a car without it now.
      Secondarily Google Maps and it’s singular inability to learn anything about the simple traffic patterns it’s supposed to model have convinced me so-called AI is a long, long way from pulling a “Terminator” on humans.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Ergonomics make or break it for me. I’m 6’3 240 and my back hurts, I’m not buying a daily driver that I have to duck and squeeze in to ever again. Clear that bar, which half the market already doesn’t, and I don’t want a bunker that I can’t see out of either.

    It’s looking like trucks the rest of the way.

  • avatar
    d4rksabre

    I think my thing would be predictable responses to driver input. Newer cars seem to be getting harder to drive, especially in bad weather. They are loaded with techno nannies that do all sorts of insane things that don’t really help and sometimes make things worse.

    I would love to drive a car that was as predictable as my old GMT Suburban or my LeSabre.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    Petty? Yes. And not a real concern in today’s modern car market? Yes.

    But I won’t buy a vehicle with hubcaps.

    • 0 avatar
      TheDutchGun

      I think only the very lowest of base model compacts still come with steelies and hubcaps. Even that would surprise me.

      My brother’s commuter car is a 16 or 17 corolla and it does indeed have hubcaps.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I would still be OK with styled steel wheels color matched to the body, bright trim rings and bright center caps.

        I think it would look pretty good on many of today’s larger vehicles like Suburbans or crew cab trucks or even large 3 row CUVs.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    Beyond the usual responses, a good instrument cluster!

    Unexcuseable that Cadillac (a lagging premium brand) doesn’t make full digital displays standard across the entire line-up. C’mon.

    It’s the one thing you see every single time you’re in the seat.

    Legible fonts, a color scheme easy on the easy, and with digital screens, lots if customization options

    • 0 avatar
      hpycamper

      Making digital instrument clusters standard would be a deal breaker for some of us. Bought a new Audi last year and specifically chose one without Audi’s Virtual Cockpit. Making it an option for those that want them is fine.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Gotta agree with hpycamper here, analog over digital every day. It’s sort of like the difference between a nice watch with three moving hands, and a cheap digital watch. Both tell the time, but only one will look good while doing it. There’s nothing special about digital displays, and we should stop being impressed by them in a era when you can buy a HD tablet at Walgreen’s for under a hundred bucks.

        I also think that having multiple configurations to choose from is more of a burden than a feature. More choice does not make people happier, just more anxious.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    A manual with the good engine.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Offering a bright or “loud” exterior color gets my attention. Especially in the “premium” segments where grayscale rules everything with an iron fist.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      along those lines—don’t offer two shades of gray for your cars, lol!

      The Enclave Avenir offers a “satin steel” gray and “dark slate” gray but of course no old-school silver, huh? (I imagine that the XT6 offers at least one of those same colors but with a different name)

      Give that RenCen color coordinator a bonus!

    • 0 avatar
      Giskard

      Exactly my stance as well. I don’t care how many shades of gray a vehicle is available in as long as they give us some good bright colors (other than the almost ubiquitous red). On a related note, customizability is a huge perk for me as well. I’ve driven 3 MINIs as my daily driver (one of each generation) primarily because they are always available in bright colors and have a ton of personalization options. They also happen to be a ton of fun to drive, but there are other cars that can compete with them there.

      • 0 avatar
        quaquaqua

        I also miss personalization! But people are part of the Apple generation now. Phones in two colors, two sizes, and don’t you dare use someone else’s apps. Cars are not much different now.

        I defiantly got a bright red Mazda6 as it was the only color offered that didn’t look like a shade of white/gray/black, and I still get compliments on it, but I would have absolutely gone with a bright teal-ish color if it were offered. If there’s one thing Geo got right (ha) it’s that all of their cars looked like Skittles.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    In a sports/touring car, a manual transmission.

    Since my commute doesn’t involve heavy traffic, I value an engaging driving experience.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Maximum engine speed and a manual transmission. I won’t buy anything for my primary use that can’t hit 8,000 RPM. I used to have a FIAT 124 Sport Spider with racing cams. It started making power at 6,500 and was supposed to drop off at 9,500 RPM. I don’t think I ever took it over 9,000 RPM, but it was nice having the headroom on longer straights.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Great seats for trips longer than 45 minutes and an excellent stereo. We recently took our GLC on an extended road trip and were disappointed with seat comfort after an hour or 2. On a lux vehicle, that’s not ok. Around town it’s fine, but will make sure that our next vehicle passes this test.

    Conversely we’re very happy with the Burmester option. It’s not the last word in hi-fi, but it’s a solid stereo that seems to be tuned well for the compressed crap I listen to when streaming, but sounds excellent when a wired connection to an iPod is made.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      A solid stereo is a good addition.

      My Toyota had the base unit (which did include bass/treble/balance) but was so thin and lacking in richness that I almost forgot how much I really ENJOYED music when alone in the car. I rarely turned the music up because there was little point.

      My Buick has the upgraded BOSE system and combined with the quiet cabin means I can actually enjoy music again and I’m picking up things in old songs that I had forgotten where there. (Hmmmmm… what’s that? Oh there’s snare drum in the background…)

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        One of the nice things about non-luxury vehicles is that stereo upgrades are possible. In my MKZ, I’m screwed because the stereo integrates the noise cancellation feature. Also, with more speakers than it actually needs, putting together a matched set in the odd sizes is near impossible. So, I’m stuck with the factory mediocre setup.

        In the Tacoma I was able to add an amplifier and set of Focal component speakers in the doors and it sounded glorious. A particular revelation was how good it sounded on single-mic big band, big room recordings of the 1950s (think Sinatra and the like).

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Great seats, low NVH, a great stereo and a unique, but visually appealing wheel design.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Solid axles.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    There isn’t one thing. I guess it comes down to the value of the package.

    The G8’s interior was head and shoulders better than the Grand Prix/Bonneville it replaced, but lagged the competition and had dated technology before it hit US shores. But the entire package of handling, power, looks, easy to maintain/work on, proven technology, made it a winner in my book.

    The Lacrosse is nicer than other “mainstream” brands but the interior doesn’t cut it as luxury class and skates close to “mainstream,” if anything. But the exterior with the 20″ rims is very attractive, the AWD system is excellent, great power, all the tech that as a driver I care about (heated rear seats would be nice but I can count on one hand with fingers left over the number of rear seat passengers I’ve carried), the safety and semi-autonomous systems work better than a lot of competition. Again – it’s the whole package.

    Going back to 2001 when I bought my Avalanche I wasn’t a huge fan of the exterior styling and cladding, but the Midgate, cargo covers and panels, the side storage, built in bumper steps (that oddly died in 2005 and then came back on almost all GM trucks a decade later), the P/T – F/T 4WD system with 4Lo, towing capability, yet decent ride and ease of driving…again…the entire package.

    Same would go for the Porsche 944S, the Ford Probe, The Merkur xR4Ti, The S10 with the 4.3L V6, etc. etc. etc.

    There is no “single” feature.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      And the G8’s interior still wasn’t that good, for what it was. It didn’t feel premium in terms of material quality, but it was pleasingly designed and I actually found it charming. It was certainly better than the contemporary Charger and 300 in that regard, though, which were products of DaimlerChrysler’s cost-cutting era.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I bought a Mitsubishi Mighty Max over a Toyota truck, because it had intermittent wipers and day-night mirror. When I got my 2014 TSX Wagon, bluetooth was important. Today I think autonomous driving would be important. Mostly to keep me from doing those things that old people do and let me drive for a few more years.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Hahahahahaha!

      I have to admit, in soggy, dark Seattle I really like having the pedestrian detection. My night vision is going to crap and people here love to be Little Johnny Invisible Pedestrian.

      I still think Level V autonomy is decades away (is in a couple) but I’m cheering for it to get here, and get here faster.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        I still think I driver well, but in 10 years some lane assist and keep me from rear ending another, or the step on the gas instead of the brakes and ramming a store is all I’m looking for. If I get really bad, then Uber can be my chauffeur.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      The one thing I hated about my Tacoma was the lack of intermittent wipers.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        – Manufacturer cost of intermittent wipers (switch and harness revisions, CAN logic) is somewhere between ~$2 and essentially free, depending on standardization.

        – Value for some customers is clearly much higher.

        How a particular manufacturer balances these two facts can reveal a lot about that company.

        (Do you feel the love they have for you?)

  • avatar
    Luke42

    A minivan with a 5000+lb towing capacity would be irritable.

    I could buy a Tahoe or something like that, but the swinging doors are a drawback (with sliding doors, my kids cannot cause a door ding, and I get better access to put in seatbelts. Also, the extra ground clearance is a problem I’d have to work around every day.

    The closest thing I’ve found is a Mercedes Metris commercial passenger van (think compact airport shuttle). But it’s RWD-only and lacks modern green powertrain options and driver assist features. But I still crush hard on ones I see around town, sometimes.

    My current plan for the big family hauler is just to buy as many plugin hybrids/EV in as many shapes.and sizes as I can afford (Pacifica Hybrid, F-150 EV, etc). It’s suboptimal when one supervan could just do it all, though.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    Its so easy it can’t be done.

    Full PLC of the C/SUV.

    I’m talking lithe, high-feature-captain’s-chairs-for-all semi-electric/super internal combustioned, pano-roofed— Jeep Compass with Alfa’s turbo/hybrid in a TSi AWD for $34k type deal.

    We need full optioning across the board and the freedom of both reliability and luxury to trust any of these companies with the mass purchase validation they’re efforting toward.

    Any of them can stop splitting and hedging— they’ll take the market once they deliver on all of a buyer’s needs.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    An interior that’s not a depressing, dark cave. Nothing luxurious about all-black interior that includes dash, seats, and carpet in black.

    Last 3 cars I’ve purchased have all had some color inside. Mustang with saddle-colored leather. Miata with parchment interior. GTI with plaid seats.

    I really like what Lincoln is doing with the all-blue interior option on its higher trims. Seats, dash, carpet, all in a matching light blue. If I wanted to spend luxury car money to get to work, a Continental with that package would be on my list.

    • 0 avatar
      crtfour

      Same for me. A black or gray interior is an automatic rule out from my standpoint. I’m looking for a truck and it’s hard to ignore the new Dodge Ram with either the 2 tone brown/off white and even better the blue/off white interior that is available on the higher trim levels.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I want a smaller wagon, preferably with a decent, tall greenhouse (although I’m also partial to a decent Saab-style 5-door fastback as well). I don’t like sitting up high, and with a one car family, max utility in a reasonably affordable car is ideal. The Golf wagon is probably close enough to my platonic ideal (added bonus for decent driving dynamics as far as appliances go, adequate power for normal driving, and restrained styling), were I willing to take on a new car payment again.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    That XT6 looks better in red, but it still doesn’t look right.

    Typical design staff process, there are several ‘competing’ designs and one is selected (regardless of trade-offs, which is another issue).

    It looks like here, there were four different designs and someone said, “Yes, let’s do all of those.”

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Matthew,

    Killer app (the question you posed):

    If I grab a pry bar or a clicker torque wrench or a shotgun, I’m pretty much guaranteed that it is going to function in the same way that it did last time – the controls have not moved or changed.

    By contrast, I got a new smartphone yesterday. The layout was different than the same brand I had before, so I spent some time working through it. Then overnight there was a software update and a lot of things moved again.

    I would like a vehicle that is more like a torque wrench and less like a smartphone.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    MUCH MORE TIRE SIDEWALL ON NEARLY ALL VEHICLES (excepting obvious niche segments such as high/ultra high performance coupes/sedans).

    The trend towards 20″, 22″ and even 19″ and 18″ wheels (on certain vehicles, even 18″ wheels are total overkill and done just for aesthetics), AND RUN FLAT TIRES, is killing ride quality, hitting consumers with horrific wheel and tire replacement costs (while brutalizing their ride quality), and is beyond ridiculous.

    In fact, going back to 18″, 17″, 16″ and even 15″ wheels (particularly on compact and subcompact vehicles) with nice, plump, thick sidewall will dramatically smooth out ride quality, help suppress road noise (assuming proper, quality tires), and save the consumer a bundle in the process.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Agreed, cars ride better and tires are cheaper and last longer with a tall sidewall. Rubberband tires are terrible on anything other then a sports car/sedan

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Small wheels and independent arm rests attached to each chair.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Yes, independent arm rests attached to captains and solo chairs.

    Also, make it easy to delete OEM installed stereo and speakers, give a credit for said delete, and make it easy for consumers to install stereo and speakers of their choice.

    SO many stock stereos/speakers SUCK that it’s an total, industry wide fail to foist such garbage on “valuable and desired” consumers.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I agree with you completely. Having worked in the industry, I know what good speakers cost and, also, how cheap some speakers are. The stuff that comes even in so-called “premium” sound systems are all in the under-$10 each unit cost range. It’s a very high profit area for manufacturers and is, frankly, a huge scam.

  • avatar
    Still thinkin

    Power. I really like power. I chose a Durango SRT because power. Its not a rocket ship but I love to drive it every day, each time I get in it I feel like its a treat.
    When I buy a vehicle that is priced above average I like to feel like it has something above average about the powertrain. Power is my first choice, but exceptional fuel economy with average performance also feels like a win.


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