By on March 9, 2022

Roman Samborskyi/Shutterstock.com

It’s a safe bet that most car enthusiasts are good drivers — or at least, generally speaking, better than the average member of the general public.

Even though we all occasionally run into trouble.

As a former co-worker once told me: “Podody’s nerfect.”

I’d guess each and every one of us has some sort of Achille’s heel when it comes to driving. You probably are perplexed by/struggle with at least one particular aspect of maneuvering a vehicle. I’d like to know what aspect vexes you.

I’ll start. Last week I was testing a Chevrolet Suburban and found myself getting nervous while making tight-quarters maneuvering in parking garages and approaching the car wash. Indeed, most of the damage I’ve done to press-fleet vehicles has involved taking a truck or large SUV and turning too tightly and scraping a bollard or pillar. I had similar issues during my dealer days.

For whatever reason, I struggle with long-wheelbase vehicles and tight turns. I’m generally competent at placing a vehicle where I want it, but in this situation, I get it wrong sometimes.

I almost put parallel parking here — as a child of the suburbs, I wasn’t very good at it when I first moved to the city. But living in densely packed parts of Chicago for the better part of two decades has helped me improve, and today’s camera and parking-sensor tech helps (though I suppose one could argue it’s a crutch that keeps me from further developing my skill). I’m a much better parallel-parker than I was a teen.

So, what’s your deal? What part of driving causes you issues, even after decades behind the wheel? Even if you’ve got track/autocross/off-road experience? Are you a bad parallel parker? Do you, like at least two people I knew in college, struggle with highway speeds? Are you not smooth with braking or accelerating? Are you klutzy when driving a manual? Bad at backing up? Terrible at trailering?

Let us know down below.

[Image: Roman Samborskyi/Shutterstock.com]

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72 Comments on “QOTD: What’s Your Biggest Weakness As A Driver?...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Getting lost. Without a GPS I’m pretty bad at knowing where to go.
    It was a problem for me before smartphones too (I carried many frequently used detailed maps in my vehicle back then) so I can’t really blame those either.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    I really struggle with driving in reverse. I can back out of a parking space no problem. But my in laws have a long narrow winding drive that they back out of. Even with a backup camera I do a three point turn and drive out.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’d rather have a pullup camera. The backup thing I’ve got down. With backing you’ve got mirrors and can sweep (the field). luckily I don’t have young kids around or retarded dogs. But inching up to make good use of a parking space, I tapped a tree the other day. OK, no damage, but I have to remember to memorize the layout/obstacles before getting in.

      Last week I was parked on a narrow deadend driveway/easement (party), so when trying to do a 4 or 5 point turn (leaving), I was going to pullup to a curb and wondered if there was a fire hydrant there and stayed a little back just in case. Oh yeah there was and there were broken bits of a tail light around it.

  • avatar

    i have difficulty driving in the rain after dark… hard to see the lines on the road with bright headlights shining in you face from oncoming vehicles… UGH!

  • avatar
    BEPLA

    I struggle with tailgaters/NASCAR wannabees – and people who are so overly-cautious and indecisive (slow, stopping where they should be going) that they put the rest of us in danger. So call my issue “Patience”

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      I HATE tailgaters. I usually start slowing down ever so slightly…1 or 2 mph at a time. Usually they run out of patience (or brains) and pass me. Even better when I pull up next to them at the next light.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        I once had a tailgater rolling right up my chuff. I completely took my foot off the gas. Got to 15 mph before he took the hint.

        Another time a chick in mommy’s Acura was tailgating. I did the same thing in the burbs and she got her idiot self honked at.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Definitely patience! Especially with people who insist on doing the speed limit in the left lane and refuse to budge, even with a line of disgruntled drivers forming behind them!

      I also can’t judge distances to save my life! Especially out the front, where my 2019 Accord seems to be as high and flat as my 1978 Cutlass was! No more low cowls on Hondas!

      And finally, my biggest nemesis, the left turn across traffic! I still can’t judge those worth a damn!

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Left lane bandits aren’t A$$ holes (although they could be), they just want to be left alone. They would stay in the slow lane, but they hate interacting with all those merging on and off the freeway, expressway, etc.

        Merging is a lost art. There’s no good way to test (new) drivers for it, but drivers that rather take surface streets (they’re not safer) no matter how much longer it takes, they simply hate or are scared of merging.

        It’s why roundabouts and cloverleaf interchanges failed in the US.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          If you’re merging at 50mph into 65+mph traffic in Northwest Ohio, consider yourself fortunate!

          There’s ways to drive as to conserve gas at appropriate times! Entering a 70mph freeway doing 40mph with oncoming semis ready to punt the poor Miata at the end of the funeral procession-cum-merging traffic line into low-Earth orbit isn’t one of those times!

  • avatar
    jack4x

    No matter how much I practice it or “know” what the right thing to do is, I don’t think I will ever be very good at backing up a trailer.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I’ve been backing up my boat for 20+ years and once in a blue moon I get all confused like I’ve never done it before and the trailer just fights me. The other 99 times I can weave backwards around parked cars and place the trailer with laser precision. Can’t explain it.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Same. Not that I practice much. I had a roommate once who had a small boat, he could maneuver the trailer into the tightest, hardest to reach parking spot you could imagine. Truly impressive.

  • avatar

    Blind spots. I can be alone on a six lane interstate and there is always a remora on my flank. I bought remote displays for my Valentines for this reason. I’ve fit euro mirrors to the passenger side-and my current car has a sensor, so that’s fixed.

    Patience. I know there is a wide variety of people out there, about half of whom have “stab brakes and say hail mary” for their entire emergency driving portfolio, if they can be bothered to put down the phone…but I don’t get why people can’t keep a steady speed, instead of doing 50, then doing 85 when you try to safely pass them. I never woad wage or crowd anyone…if you are incompetent I don’t need to interact or be near you..but some people are oblivious.

    Phones. I very often see someone holding a phone and talking, in a car that you know has bluetooth…..

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I drive too damn fast!

  • avatar
    NigelShiftright

    For some inexplicable reason, I am not good at evading potholes. I think I’ve put them in the right place relative to the fender crease, and then WHAM!

    God knows it’s not from lack of practice, given the roads where I live.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      With my poor judgment of distance out the front, If I’m going around a slow curve in something like a drive-thru line, I overcompensate and curb a wheel! Needless to say, my wheel/tire warranty has paid for itself!

  • avatar
    gasser

    I have a Mercedes GLC. The HVAC and Infotainment is HORRIBLY designed. I can’t turn the temp up, turn down the fan speed or flip around the vents without taking my eyes off the road. Then when looking back at the road (age 74), it takes my eyes a moment to readjust to the correct distance. This current trend in stupid control design led us to NOT buy a Tesla. Best HVAC system controls ever were in my 1995 Ford Windstar. Why do manufacturers need to re-invent the wheel??

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Preach it and Amen.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      If anyone wants to start a protest convoy regarding the ludicrous placement and use of HVAC, radio and other controls in vehicle, that is one protest that I will join.

    • 0 avatar

      LOL. Based on “how often do I have to touch it”, a simple temp/fan/vent three wheel system is perfect. Auto is nice but you turn on Auto…thermostat…then adjust fan when it’s too high, or you need more windshield air….but the three wheel NOT AUTO system is better.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I couldn’t disagree more. Most auto systems (except for the awful one in our former Forester) are set-and-forget for me. The three-wheel systems are a nightmare of constant temperature and fan adjustments.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Exactly this!

          I’m into my fourth Accord, all of which have had automatic climate control. Most of the time, I set full automatic mode and the temperature, then turn off the A/C and let the system do its thing.

          Now, if I’m in a manual climate vehicle, I’ll constantly be fiddling with the controls!

          • 0 avatar
            tankinbeans

            When in a vehicle with manual controls I usually set and forget two. Winter setting for me has always been just to the tail end of the blue temperature, low-medium fam, with defrost/feet. With the auto climate in my current car I usually have to smack the defrost button and turn down the fan in the morning because it can’t quite get the defroster right. “Hey car, let the engine build some heat before blowing off its meager supply making noise but not much else.”

            I hate being in a car with somebody who can’t find the happy medium. The typical scenario I get in somebody else’s car is full temperature, full fan. Then the car is too hot after awhile, so we turn off the fan completely. Back to full temperature, full fan. Rinse, repeat. Drives me nuts.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Patience is a virtue in the driver behind you and a vice in the driver in front of you.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    As a general personality trait, I dislike people who can’t handle periods of silence and feel need for constant conversational engagement. My friends know this, but I don’t want yappy passengers because then I’ll start missing turns, etc.

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    I have little patience with people who leave their high beams on, the ones who cut in and out (repeatedly) of traffic nor the ones who drive slow on the left lane.
    My wife tells me to get over it but I just can’t.

    • 0 avatar
      NigelShiftright

      You would not like driving on semi-rural roads in WV, where every pickup has apparently been modified with USAF surplus B-52 landing lights.

      • 0 avatar
        eng_alvarado90

        I’d definitely not but here in So Cal the biggest constraint are the roads have been overcrowded for years and low speed left lane drivers are fairly common and contribute to that and me losing patience over the years.

  • avatar
    cook_diesel

    I do not like backing out of a parking space at any time anywhere day or night. I normally back-in to a space because it’s easier for me to maneuver between parked cars or stationary objects. I always fear I’m going to hit some phantom moving car or phantom pedestrian in a split second when backing out even when using my cameras, mirrors or a 3-point turn. I’m that person who drives painfully slow when backing out of a parking space.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      Agree. Parking lots terrify me. I park far from an entrance because I always need exercise, but also to avoid other movement s.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      It is always safer to back into a stall. I developed that habit decades ago driving large vehicles with poor rearward visibility.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Yeah. Backing out painfully slow. With no visibility, and doing that, I’ve never had a problem. Isn’t that how it’s supposed to be done?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I always get freaked-out if someone comes in behind me and starts to follow me around the lot as I try to find a space—because ** I ** get impatient if I’m behind someone who can’t seem to make a decision!

  • avatar
    JMII

    I’ve only parallel parked a handful of times in my life, so if you asked me to do it the results would be ugly for sure. I’ve lived in the suburbs all my life where everyone has a driveway and strip malls offer plenty of parking. When I worked in downtown my building had a parking garage and we walked to lunch so I’ve just managed to avoid parallel parking situations.

    I tend to misjudge where the front of my C7 is. The hood is just so long with a sizeable front overhang plus you sit in the middle of the vehicle so it completely messes with the sense of the car’s size. Even on track I find the front end vague (in position and feel) as to the my front wheels are vs apex curbing. In normal driving I reverse into parking spots because its so much easier to see thanks to the backup camera. After a few model years GM added front parking cameras and now I fully understand why. The C7 is so low your typical curb/car stop will wreck the front splitter. Its about the only park of driving it that makes me nervous. Well that and rain since 460 RWD HP and wide tires is asking to hydroplane so I drive grandma slow in wet weather.

    • 0 avatar

      Having lived in NYC and suffered Alternate Side of the Street Parking, which is mostly a revenue device….I’m quite good at that one task, even the left side of the street version. You can squeeze a car into a space six inches longer than the diagonal measurement of the car, with some patience, and the car behind you can wait, this is a free space in NYC, thank you. More deceptive are the curbs some Towns use to look rustic. Instead of being flat, they are an uneven/rough hewn surface, and will DO your rims with even a casual touch, whereas flat curbs/poured concrete wouldn’t contact, much less maul. I don’t actually think I’m good though..in Europe, those folding mirrors exist for A REASON…and there, I’ve seen some things….

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        One thing about having lived in cities my whole life is that I’m pretty good at jamming cars into tiny parking spots, both parallel and in garages, without contact. During my single days I learned that the casually easy one-try parallel parking job into a tiny space with the wheels 6″ from the curb was a surefire way to impress girls.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’ll throw in that I’m also terrible at parallel parking. I’ve done it a handful of times since taking my test in 2004, but living in the burbs I’ve not really needed it.

    Another thing I cop to is more me as a spectator, rather than a driver. My coworkers insist on backing into a parking spot, which is fine. I also back in. However, instead of doing a rough facsimile of a 90° backing park, they do this weird 170°-180° backing park. They pull into a spot on the other side of the one they want and then pull straight back. To top it off their cars aren’t even remotely straight. I get unduely irritated.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    To quote one of the funniest comedians of all time, George Carlin: I don’t have pet peeves. I have major psychotic (blanking) hatred. So it’s very safe to say that my weakness is my patience behind the wheel. Time is our only nonrenewable resource. Over eons, that oil will be formed in the Earth, we can replant a tree, and the sun will shine, but we will NEVER get that second back in our lives. It’s gone forever. So I have ZERO patience for those drivers that feel like the laws of driving and traffic flow don’t apply to them. In Louisville, there is this strange quirk where way too many drivers merge onto a highway at 35mph. It’s constant. And it causes too many wrecks and swerves. I learned how to drive in Philly. It’s part of that Thunderdome/Mad Max part of the country when it comes to driving. Pull that crap in Philly and watch what happens. Best case is a finger in your direction. Worst case is being driven off of the road. And I will brakecheck a tailgater with an evil grin on my face. Or I’ll mess with them. Just this morning driving to work in a light rain and wet roads, some clown in a Mercedes-Benz (complete with the “please look at me and my Mercedes because I have no self-esteem” light up grille badge) was riding inches off of my rear bumper. I’m going 70 in a 65. The left lane is empty. And if anyone is going to ride me that close, I want dinner. So I did the very gradual slowdown 1-2 mph at a time. Eventually the clueless one finally went around and the Philly in me gave him a LED headlight blast for several miles.

    Other weaknesses…pulled ligaments in my left middle finger due to overuse. Wishing a slow and painful demise on the driver next to me blasting that 100% AutoTune “music” at a volume that can be heard on Mars. And I have to suppress the near constant urge to use large amounts of turbo torque to not speed up and block out the mouth breather who knew 2 miles back that the lane was ending but waits until 50 feet before the hard barrier meets them up close and personal…

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “So I have ZERO patience for those drivers that feel like the laws of driving and traffic flow don’t apply to them.’

      I hate people that swerve in and out of lanes to gain a car length on traffic. I’ve come close a few times to getting hit on my motorcycle. If I see them coming when I’m in my pickup I’ll play subtle mind games with them. I can see them aiming for an opening next to me and I’ll slowly close the hole. I’ll then slowly speed up. they’ll swerve behind me waiting for a gap to form in the next lane. I’ll drive at the same speed until the gap is almost there then slow down very gradually. They end up weaving back and forth behind me expecting to get past.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I have a buddy who was a volunteer firefighter for a few years, and after witnessing the aftermath of a double-fatality incident where a Trans Am ended up halfway up a tree and wrapped partially around the trunk, he started to resolutely and without any exceptions whatsoever, never exceed a posted speed limit! Riding in his car was a white-knuckle proposition, and even following behind him was dangerous, as I found out one time when I was following him on the freeway, and he forgot about the 65-to-55mph zone ahead momentarily, so I backed-off and made sure I had room to my left. Suddenly, he realized the limit had changed and locked the brakes, and I dodged over two lanes!

      Not long after that, an irritated driver managed to shoot past the line of traffic behind him while on a connector ramp and cut into his lane, forcing him off the road and into the grass! I told him that he probably had that coming! He’s since driven with the flow.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @sgeffe – I taught my son’s to follow the flow of traffic in a safe manner just like my dad taught me.

        My dad also used to say, “The traffic light just turned green but it doesn’t mean it’s safe to enter the intersection.”
        I worked part-time as a paramedic for 20 years. Adherence to that mantra has saved my butt on the job and in civilian life.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Gas approaches $5/gallon, so I drive like my grandmother – and she’s dead and never got a driver’s license. If you’re behind me, tough toenails.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Parking…! I used to laugh at folks with their back up cameras…Now its must have. I’m on my second Epsilon Impala you just can’t see the where the rear end is. I would rather drive it into a spot, and back out of it..By todays standards the Chevy is big, but I can live with it.

    I’ve always wondered about a Tahoe/Yukon …I’m an old guy, so a local dealer handed me the keys to a Demo ..I took it for a ride through the urban environment where I live . Parking garages, Costco parking lot, and tight older narrow streets …The the” pucker factor” came into play more than once !… ..I had it out for an hour or so , handed the dealer back his keys…No Tahoe for this guy.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I have no idea how people drive even full size trucks as my mid-size Dakota makes most parking spots seem 1/2 sized. I learned to drive using a Dodge Omni then spent the all of high school and college driving a Civic hatchback. I feel so much more comfortable in small vehicles. Even my C7 seems massive compared to my 350Z.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        JMII – I was lucky enough to learn to drive on a 1960 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88. 18 and a half feet long, 6 and 2/3 feet wide, and weighed around 2 tons. Used it for drivers test including the parallel parking portion – that took 3 tries but I passed. Set me up to drive pretty much anything after that. LOL!

        • 0 avatar
          SilverCoupe

          bullnuke – We had a 1959 Oldsmobile Super 88, but by the time I learned to drive, my parents had gotten a “small” car – a 1964 Riviera!

          Having learned on that, I sure felt like a pro at parking when I had my Audi TT. I could squeeze that car into just about any space!

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s all relative. Jumping into a fullsizer after driving a commercial 8.5 ft wide and 30 ft long, they feel like compacts.

        Yet everyone I loan my F-150 to that comes from a compact, I can tell from the tires they clipped curbs when cornering.

        So you have to drive them a little different than compacts is all.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I’ve never developed enough feel to hit that fine line between bogging and peeling out with consistency. So when I nail a launch it just feels like a happy accident.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I am the type of person who relaxes by going on long drives, yes even with current fuel prices. And the best conversations that I have had have generally been in a vehicle. Looking out the windows instead of at each other.

    Recently getting fitted for a pair of glasses, night driving is no longer an issue.

    As posted previously I would no longer purchase a vehicle without blind spot monitoring. Mostly due to the amount of traffic in the Toronto are and the number of erratic drivers.

    I dislike back-up cameras. The glare disturbs my night vision. We used to practice driving around the neighbourhood in reverse as teenagers. However I do have to admit that the rear cross traffic warning is now something that I appreciate.

    Lack of patience may be my greatest fault as a driver. I really get upset at drivers who keep applying their brakes on major/divided highways to slow down or open a gap between themselves and the vehicle ahead of them. Don’t they understand how to use the ‘gas pedal’? How to pace themselves. Using the brake creates one of those ‘waves’ that often ends up in an collision hundreds of yards behind them.

  • avatar
    JRED

    My night vision is awful since I wear contacts, especially when it’s wet out.

    I can’t navigate for crap. Blame it on my ADHD (diagnosed and I should still be taking my medicine but I quit), but I am terrible about getting lost. In my old job driving a box truck to many remote locations, before smart phones, it was a huge problem. Heck it was a month before I knew how to get to my kid’s daycare in the middle of a little nearby town, with all the different little roads there. I still can’t find wife’s church, near the same daycare.

    Last, I’ve been known to push a little too hard through curves just enough that one wheel goes over the white line, where there happens to be a big hole, and I end up with a bent rim. Has happened 2x in the past 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      @JRED – you and me both. I have a type of (crazy expensive even with insurance) contact lens that corrects astigmatism and helps with small print at the same time. The downside is that at night there are halos around most light sources. And if it’s raining, ouch. All of the light bouncing around really requires a lot of focus just ahead of me. Not saying that nighttime driving in the rain is a hazard to both me and everyone on the road (the VW is responsible for that), but there is just extra eye strain to focus.

      And in the days before nav systems and Google Maps and Waze, I thought I could navigate pretty much everywhere. Heck, it took no time flat to figure out the craziness of the exit ramps on and off of the highways in Washington, DC. And then I went to Boston. That was as close as I’ve ever been to leaving a car on the side of the road with a note under the wiper stating that “I give up…walking home.” If you’re born, raised, and learn to drive in Boston, congratulations. You can handle any crazy town and psychotic drivers in Italy and Greece. I think even New Jersey drivers show a sign of respect to Boston drivers for they are the bravest and craziest out there. You have to be!!!

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    In my wee city my vehicular failing is adhering to the rule of law, apparently.

    I’m cheap so I don’t speed enough to ever get a ticket. Nor do I ever roll stop signs; roll right turns on red lights; or floor it to clear a bloodshot yellow light. I don’t want to incur any mandatory donations to our local enforcement’s treasury, frankly. The result of this frugalness is hilarity in the rearview mirror: double middle fingers for stopping at a stop sign are common. I’ve seen a woman screaming at her windshield because I came to a complete stop before entering a 100 Km/h highway, as required. I’ve even been obliged to roll a stop in the snow a few times, after seeing a car careening towards my rear bumper, out of control, because its driver assumed I’d break the law.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I get too angry too easily with other drivers. When I drove professionally I became really, really good at letting their stupidity roll off my back. Now, when I only drive occasionally, they provoke me into stupid acts of my own too often.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Yes if the rear axle is further behind you and wider than what you’re used to, you’re going to hit things if you don’t compensate for it.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “It’s a safe bet that most car enthusiasts are good drivers”

    • No, it isn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      That’s true and I was bad at the limit, or 9/10ths, like normal people I suppose. I couldn’t afford to do a driving school, but I knew there were books out there.

      I had to special order it from a book store, but I got a hold of Bob Bondurant’s High Performance Driving, studied it from cover to cover, practiced, referred to it again and again before I got it.

      I first was obsessed with drifting and reverse J-turns (Rockfords) and although it doesn’t refer to them directly, all the pieces are there.

      It’s required reading to get the most out of your sports or sporty car and safely to a point.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I have no problem with navigation. I am very good at knowing roughly where I’m at and when my mom, who got lost less than 2 miles from our house a couple of times, was alive, I used to play a game where I would come to a stop and say, “Take us home!”, and let her tell me where to go. One time, we started out on the west side of Toledo, and wound up in Indiana. She ignored traffic signs, the sunset to the west, businesses with phone numbers with non-Ohio area codes, and just kept going until she saw the Indian welcome sign. Sometimes she would suddenly blurt out, “Where the hell are we?” and we would be minutes from home! She insisted one day that I was just telling her we were almost home, but were somewhere “I’ve never been before!” Not only had she been there many times, but my grandmother lived less than a half mile from that spot for 10 years. The look on her face when I turned onto grandma’s street was hilarious. As bad as she was at navigation, she could remember people’s address and phone numbers from when she was a kid, even when she was 87.

    My main problems are I’m a terrible parallel parker, and I’m pretty impatient with, as my grandmother used to say, “Dawdlers”. Yesterday, I was going down a 45MPH street. It was sunny, dry, and the couple in the newish Blazer were going 30, and I was not happy about it, and made some very nasty comments to myself about them. I finally turned off, and went to a parallel street just to keep from getting really angry about them. I made it to the same place they were headed several minutes before they did, and was still shaking my head when they came into the store I was in.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      My general disdain for people who insist on never exceeding some arbitrary number on a sign despite the line of people stretching a mile behind them is even greater when the person in front of me, in a 35mph zone, say, mistakes it as a 25mph zone!

      If I had a nickel for every time I’ve been behind some moron doing that on Front Street between downtown Perrysburg and the Perrysburg-Maumee Bridge, I’d have been retired at age 35! And I’m not the only one who gets annoyed by this apparently; last weekend after I went around the slowpoke in the Kia Sportage in front and moved over on the approach to the bridge by the park entrance, the dude in the BMW that had been behind me went shooting by that driver AND me like we were standing still, complete with a “you’re number 1” salute out the sunroof to the Kia!

      Unrelated to this, which I should have posted elsewhere: I get annoyed as all-get-out when semis are in the left lane, because unlike in Kentucky, where I’ve witnessed a line of trucks flying in the left lane of I-75 at a speed of at least 75mph—in a downpour—trucks in Northwest Ohio will inevitably slow traffic, especially in that infernal, eternal, I-75 construction zone!

  • avatar

    Driving a manual – I never feel like I’m using the clutch correctly or as smoothly as I should/could. Maybe the fact that my last manual went for over 350k with the clutch just starting to slip a bit indicates otherwise, but I never feel I’ve really got it down.

    I don’t handle tailgaters very well either. It’s obvious – to me anyway – that they want to drive faster than I, but choose not to pass, even when more than enough clear road is present, for whatever reason. I usually do what another poster mentioned. I slow my speed to ‘encourage’ the motorist behind me to pass – 1 or 2 mph at a time. Most will pass after a short while, but I have been as slow as 45 in a 55 before the person passes. I sometimes think it’s due to inattention on their part, but my brother thinks the fact that my car – especially taillights in the dark – is the same make as our state highway patrol cars adds to the situation. In the distant past I have had someone tailgate me on a 4 lane at night with virtually no traffic around either of us for miles. I think I got to 35 mph before they passed. BTW, speeding up doesn’t work as they continue at the same following distance.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Sometimes, when you’re in a place where it’s safe to do so, it can be fun to speed up 1 mph at a time and see how fast you can get going before they panic and back off. On one occasion I slowly got a tailgater up to 105 mph before they suddenly slammed on the brakes.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        If I get that desperate with a tailgater, if I get room enough on the right, or if I’m on a single-lane road and the shoulder ahead and behind is clear, I’ll veer to the right, and as Maverick said in “Top Gun,” “hit the brakes—he’ll fly right on by!”

  • avatar

    I cannot resist a big puddle/opportunity to “splash” with the car. I don’t do this to people (I’m not a psycho), but if there’s no one around? SPLASH!! I can’t help it. I have curbed wheels, slammed into potholes, and other such stupidity, and I never learn.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Maybe in the past you could get away with it, when vehicles didn’t have rubber bands for tires!

      Heck, I freak out if I’m not paying attention and miss a speed bump, so I’m sure you can imagine if I hit a pothole badly! I learned early in my driving career that puddles usually are hiding nasty stuff underneath, and have invoices from the wheel alignments and suspension work to prove it! Hence my skittishness on any rough patch of road today!

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      I’m with you on that one – I love to create a huge rooster tail when rainwater accumulates. Maybe those who don’t drive through the water but wish they would might dare to do it, and enjoy the moment, if they see me do it.
      It could just be that as the years add up, acting like a silly kid for a few seconds just for the hell of it makes you feel just a bit younger.

      What I do badly – hitting the curb with the bottom of the lower edge of the front bumper when parking. It doesn’t happen often, but every now and then is too often.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    I have trained myself to not become overly worked up about the following pet peeves: indecisive drivers, people who touch brakes repeatedly to slow down, people who pull out in front of you at a much slower speed/failing to speed up (augmented by going 50 feet & turning off when there was no one behind you), those who can’t merge properly, people who find my cruise controlled speed too slow, pass me – jump in front of me, and then I have to brake for them, people who can’t judge distances, and drive a 1/2 car length from the curb on narrow streets….I think that’s enough, although I’m CERTAIN that there are more that I could list! :-)

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