By on July 9, 2019

Are you sitting around waiting for a Tesla Model S or Model X update before spending your hard-earned money on the high-end electric vehicle of your dreams? You might as well just buy now because, according to Elon Musk himself, there is no major refresh or updates coming to either of Tesla’s top-end models. Cue the sad trombone.

In response to a tweet from last night, Musk answered the question as to whether there would be an update on the horizon. “There is no ‘refreshed’ Model X or Model S coming” said the CEO, “only a series of minor ongoing changes.” Musk went on to then say there there might be small updates over time, like integrating the motor from the Model 3 into the S and X, but that just happened recently so there’s nothing in the pipeline. 

The Twitter user then asked if there’d be any interior updates, because there have been alleged leaks of testing a new minimalist interior. The answer from Musk was quite direct.

“No.”

Other than the change in electric motors, which resulted in improved range, the only major update to the Model S was the removing of the grille from the front of the car. The X hasn’t had any major changes. While the automotive industry does update more slowly than big tech, most manufacturers would have looked into a full refresh at this point.

While there isn’t a need to update for the sake of range — the Model S’s 370 miles of range is fantastic — there are some areas of the car that could be improved upon. Interior materials are fine for a semi-premium commuter, but other cars at the Model S price point have nicer places inside to spend your time. Most just don’t offer a 100 percent EV experience. Not yet, anyway.

Though this should be good news for people looking to buy. Purchasing now before the federal tax credit goes away completely will save the buyer a few bucks in the long run, and customers don’t have to fear an update coming out that makes their brand new car obsolete. It appears Tesla is currently focusing most of its efforts on the upcoming Model Y and future products.

[Image: Tesla]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

66 Comments on “No “Refreshed” Model X or Model S Coming, Says Musk...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    Just bring back the original grill for the Model S, the refreshed face looks horrible. It was a downright looker before the update, the current grill is very unappealing and hurts the whole cars appearance. Hell put the original face of the S on the X too. Tesla’s new corporate front end isn’t just hard on the eyes but it’s rather bland for a supposed luxury car.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Beauty and the beholder, I suppose. I like the current look. To me, the former nose resembles a largemouth bass.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        You don’t take the grill off and leave the spot where it is supposed to go. The current design looks like a supplier simply forgot to cut the opening and install the grill. If you want to do grilless the early 90s offer a wealth of examples…the Original Lexus SC, the Gen 1 Saturn’s, and the 300z of the period all got it right. The Tesla looks like they tried to skimp on tooling for new body components and wrecks an otherwise stunning car.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      There is nothing more ridiculous than that original Model S giant fake grill where no intake was present or needed. I’m intrigued now that used Tesla prices are finally starting to fall, but not enough to take one with the singing Bigmouth Billy Bass face. Give me the new duckface Tesla all day.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Personally I can’t stand the new face, it just does not look right to me at all, sure a grille isn’t necessary for obvious reasons but they could have done just about anything else in my opinion and it would have looked better than an acre of plastic with a sharp curve at an odd place.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    sounds like a desperate cost-cutting move (YMMV).

    Not many carmakers can get away with a long model cycle.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > Not many carmakers can get away with a long model cycle.

      What are you talking about? MS had its mid-cycle refresh less than 3 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Nah. I think full size luxury buyers are just conservative that way: they want the manufacturer to get it right, make running improvements, and avoid needless cosmetic revisions. This frankly protects their investment. It’s hard to tell a Lexus LS 400-600 or Mercedes S class apart from one decade to the next, and that’s by design. Tesla has quietly made hundreds of running improvements — they don’t do model years in the conventional sense — and IIRC they just upgraded or are about to upgrade the air suspension.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        > IIRC they just upgraded or are about to upgrade the air suspension.

        Already in production for a month or two. It is a HUGE improvement. The new suspension is excellent.

  • avatar
    Asdf

    Elon Musk should be focusing ALL his efforts on fixing the inherent DEFECT in ALL Teslas ever made, namely the EXTREMELY LONG charging times. It shouldn’t take more than five minutes to fully recharge a Tesla. Since all Teslas take more time than that, Musk needs to prioritize fixing this problem ASAP, and then recall ALL Teslas ever made that are still on the road today, and retrofit the fix free of charge. If he’s not actively working on this, he needs to be fired, as that means he’s not doing his job.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      He’s currently the longest-serving CEO in the auto industry. I guess the board doesn’t agree with you.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Elon and Tesla may have more imminent pronounced problems from the on-going investigations in China.

      I’m NOT a fan but my guess would be that “extremely long charging times” are not high on Tesla’s list of what needs Elon’s attention. You plug it in and it recharges overnight – you just can’t go very far in it.

      Not on the same scale as Boeing’s 737-MAX debacle, but Tesla’s problems could very well be an existential threat to Tesla.

      I would like to see Tesla succeed and be a vibrantly profitable, self-sustaining EV maker, not for myself, but certainly for all the BEV fans that desire to buy a vehicle of their choice.

      Everyone should be able to drive exactly what they want, within their means. That includes BEV fans.

      • 0 avatar
        Asdf

        The extremely long charging times should be at the very top of Tesla’s list of things to address, because it’s one of those basic things that needs to be fixed for Tesla to become a viable automaker. If that’s not a prioritized goal for Tesla, then I don’t know what is, and the company should close up shop, as it doesn’t have the required competence and know-how to make cars.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      The two main fallacies of your argument are that every ICE vehicle is full every time you start it and that they are always driven until the low fuel light comes on. You cling to an outdated analog argument that it takes sooooo long to charge a Tesla. Does charging time really matter when you plan for it and you vehicle is fully charged when you’re ready to go? Or do you go the gas station every day or call AAA as you drift to the side of the road, out of fuel? Same analogy applies to dry cleaning; you drop it off and pick it up at a set time. Most people are willing to make the dry cleaning/ironed shirt trade-off. Most of my friend who own EVs also have ICE vehicles. Their flow chart kinda goes like this: take extra time to stop at mini mart get gas for 4runner, get home a tad later; or pull in garage, plug in Tesla, open door, walk in house. I do not understand your rants against “unacceptable charging time” when EV owners are doing something else. Evil Grin; perhaps you’ve never wanted to say; “Hey baby 90 minutes until the EV’s charged”.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Realistically, it makes no sense to spend development resources on the S and X. The 3 sells 10 times their volume, and Tesla has long stated that the 3 and Y are the future.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      @SCE, seems like you forgot about the profit margin Tesla was making on the S/X. $40k Model 3s aren’t even close.

      And 10x volume is incorrect as well, check the 2019 delivery forecast, back out the projected S/X sales and get back with the info. We’ll see if they update the projected deliveries after Q2 is done.

      I’d be willing to bet that many potential buyers aren’t interested in a 7 year old interior, even if they installed the Model 3 rear motor in the front.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        OK, 4x. Pardon my hyperbole.

        • 0 avatar
          civicjohn

          @SCE, thanks, I wish they would have updated 2019 shipments guidance, we’ll see if they release any information with the Q2 numbers. Guidance was 360-400k cars for 2019, and usually about 100k were S/X at a much higher margin.

          They’ve shipped about 155-160k cars in the first half of 2019, so I don’t know how they are going to hit that guidance. Perhaps that explains the leaked email from Guillen to employees that said they were “making preparations” to raise output.

          The claim is they can make 1000 cars per day now – so 180 days X 1,000 = 180k units, still under guidance and at a much lower margin. We shall see.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “so 180 days X 1,000 = 180k units, still under guidance and at a much lower margin. We shall see.”

            You forgot about the new factory, so add at least 30k more units at a much lower margin.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      As Musk said yesterday, the Tesla vehicles will soon cease to be a consumer product, the automated taxi service will be so wildly popular and financially profitable that most production will be diverted to commercial service. Taxi customers really won’t care about refreshes.

      The will need to beef up the suspension parts though, to fix all those whompy wheel issues, most taxi service will be in pothole and curb filled city environments.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    All the Tesla models are one-trick ponies: very fast acceleration. 375 miles of range actually means 375 * 60% = 225 miles in every day use (i.e. not supposed to charge past 80% or go below 20% in daily use) in nice weather (subtract another 30-50% in very cold weather). Meanwhile a 5 series or E-class can typically go 400 to 600 miles and be filled up again in 5 minutes to go another 400+ miles every day of the year.

    Tesla cars don’t ride particularly well, and don’t have the adjustable damper control to allow both good handling and smooth ride that are available on other luxury brands, and the interiors are sub-par in quality and sound-proofing and more comparable to mass-market brands. How often do you need sub-3 second 0-60 times? How often to you want a really comfortable seat and quiet ride?

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      That sounds like some logical thinking about Tesla’s products. As cars, I think they have some limitations. I think that’s why Musk is dead set on autonomous driving. It’s the company’s best hope at gaining a competitive advantage and maintaining shareholder interest.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @Stingray: “Meanwhile a 5 series or E-class can typically go 400 to 600 miles and be filled up again in 5 minutes to go another 400+ miles every day of the year.”

      If you can afford a Tesla, 5 series, or E-class, you can afford airfare and can fly coast-to-coast and to Europe. Try that in an E-Class. How many hours is 800 f’ng miles on the road? I’m not doing that in a car.

      “(i.e. not supposed to charge past 80% or go below 20% in daily use) ” That’s BS. Total BS. I’ve been charging to 100% for five years and 85k miles and really haven’t lost any noticeable range. Still charges to 100%. Dropping below 20% isn’t an issue either. You can do it. Tesloop is another example. Also, if you’re good at regen and driving smoothly, or even heavy slow traffic conditions, you can go beyond the EPA ratings. I’ve managed 20% above EPA rating on long trips.

      The temperature thing is partially BS as well. What you don’t mention is battery preheating while you are plugged in. That reduces the loss quite a bit.

      So what you are saying is a Telsa isn’t good for 800 to 1200 mile daily commutes that most TTAC readers have. Okay. More than a 5 minute stop after 6 and a half hours is too long? 6.5 hours on the road and 30 minutes is too long to wait to then drive another 6.5 hours? Yeah, right. Doesn’t your astronaut diaper need changing at that point? Just curious, I’ve never worn them.

      Doesn’t have adjustable suspension??? What are you talking about?? Maybe you should watch this video review of Teslas adjustable suspension.

      youtu.be/xhGVTJ_FWAM

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        MCS – oh wow, my information is apparently 2 months out-of-date since the video is from May 2019, and the description of the adjustable dampers are not even in the Tesla manual at that time. And lots of the country goes on lots of road trips – not everyone lives in LA and NYC. Try flying from Lincoln Nebraska to Bozeman, Montana or Fort Wayne Indiana to Madison, Wisconin and driving starts to look pretty attractive. And not everyone wants to plan their journeys around electric recharging possibilities, and some people are even afraid to fly, and still have enough money to buy a nice car.

        As for battery life and charging – you are full of crap because all the manufacturers strongly discourage using the full battery capacity except on occasional long road trips.

        You Tesla fanboies need to cut back on all that weed you are smoking.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “As for battery life and charging – you are full of crap”

          I’m not. Newer battery tech and batteries that have an actual capacity greater than what is stated so that a 100% charge is internally 80%. Was originally told that by one of the manufacturer’s engineers and verified it with diagnostic tools. It’s also common knowledge on the internet that some manufacturers are doing it. One way I could tell was that my charge rate was staying near max rate up to 92% before is dropped below 50kW. Diagnostic tools that could see the extra capacity confirmed it.

          I have real experience with this stuff and use similar systems in robotics and unmanned vehicles. Not spewing uninformed misinformation on the internet for whatever purpose like some people. Some manufacturers are even criticized in reviews for being excessive with the hidden capacity.

          Besides, even if there was a real issue, the batteries have warranties and if something happens, you get a replacement like Tesloop.

          “You Tesla fanboies need to cut back on all that weed you are smoking.”

          Not smoking anything. Not a “fanbois” either. Just stating facts to ignorant trolls with a paid agenda. People can do a bit of research and easily see you are wrong.

          In fact, here’s an article about battery management and what goes on internally:

          https://cleantechnica.com/2018/08/26/the-secret-life-of-an-ev-battery/

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        “If you can afford a Tesla, 5 series, or E-class, you can afford airfare and can fly coast-to-coast and to Europe.”

        An excellent argument for removing subsidies from Teslas.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @ToddAtlasF1: Totally agree with you on removing subsidies for Teslas. That’s happening now.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            @mcs: In addition to the direct subsidy to shameless buyers, there is also the little matter of the $5200/per car subsidy Tesla gets from the carbon trading scam in the US and even more abroad. Pull them and we’ll see whether Tesla has a business model that goes beyond rent-seeking.

        • 0 avatar
          SilverCoupe

          I have an E-class type car, and I can tell you I never drive from the east coast of the US to Europe. The extended submersion in salt water would be he11 on the car.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “How often do you need sub-3 second 0-60 times?”

      More often than I need to drive over 250 miles in one shot.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > not supposed to charge past 80% or go below 20% in daily use

      While most owners tend to do this, Tesla and Musk have repeatedly said that this is not going to affect battery health.

      > 5 series or E-class can typically go 400 to 600 miles

      As an owner of a BMW 550i and a Tesla Model S, I will testify in court that the two cars have very similar daily range, with the exception that the Tesla is always full in the morning. My 550i is lucky to get 300 miles out of its 16 gallon tank.

      > don’t have the adjustable damper control to allow both good handling
      > and smooth ride that are available on other luxury brands

      They do now. The new suspension on both MS and MX is very good. It has adjustable damper control and provides terrific ride in Comfort mode and terrific handling in Sport mode.

      > are sub-par in quality and sound-proofing and more comparable to mass-market brands

      While not quite up to 5er/E-klasse standards, the MS and MX are very quiet cars and have far better soundproofing than mass-market brands. Having said that, I will say that there are some extremely quiet mass-market cars that blow away a lot of premium models when it comes to soundproofing.

  • avatar
    downunder

    All this talk about “fast charging” and 5 min recharge time underlines that some people don’t understand physics. If you have to charge a 70kw battery from 0% to 100% in a normal situation that’ll take about 7-8 hours at 10kw per hour. Now reduce the time to 1 hour. You now have increased the charge to around 70kw per hour (average hour electric heater = 2kw/hour) so now you have energy that is 45 times greater than your heater belting down the lines and into the car. Now, let’s reduce that to 1/10th of an hour (6 minutes). now you have 700kw flowing down the power cable. How big a cable is that going to be? This is a massive amount of energy. Your battery pack would have to be cooled with liquid nitrogen to absorb the heat from that! A recharge station would look like a Saturn Five launch pad. Heat is the killer here. That is why BEV vehicles have decent cooling systems around the battery pack, never mind the occupants.

    The only reason that gasoline/petrol take five minutes is that petrol/gasoline is the most energy-dense product we can safely handle, without (mostly) killing our selves in the process. Try handling 700kw and spill a little! Barbeque anybody?

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      It would help if you used electrical terms correctly.

      What is a 70kW battery? kW is a measure of power, not energy. Presumably you mean 70kWh.

      You don’t charge at 10kW per hour. You charge at 10kW. One elapsed hour will then net you 10kWh of stored energy. kW times hours is energy or kWh. Stencilled right on your electric meter on the house. A commercial or industrial demand meter reads average power and is labeled kW.

      “kW per hour” is not an engineering or physical term. Sorry, that’s just the way it is. It’s like saying horsepower per hour, which means nothing at all to anyone.

      I get what you’re trying to say, I think – you just need to clean up your terms, so that your argument relates to accepted engineering or commercial terms.

      So, of course, applying 700kW – 1MW of power to a battery pack is ridiculous. The ampacity of the electrical wiring conductors within the vehicle cannot handle it for a start. Tripling the cross-sectional area of the conductors on-board with the resulting added weight is a no-go. The batteries cannot be charged at such a high rate without overheating either, due to their internal resistance.

      But this place is filled with many commenters who have no engineering or technical training whatsoever. They can unfortunately, however, type, and produce giant opinions signifying nothing much at all, merely revealing their incompetence. Asdf is a prime example of such, and no amount of attempting to educate him on the physical realities of fast charging has worked in the past. Only magic will suffice to satisfy him.

      The site itself lacks any authority in technical matters, so no editor will stand up and tell any person with technical challenges to bug out and go bother someone else who may be similarly afflicted with lack of education and knowledge. Besides, they need the clicks. Welcome to an internet world where we all get to read any old rubbish and have to apply our own commonsense and bin the stupid stuff just like we ignore ads. Nobody takes responsibility for anything editorially, so if I tell you the world is flat and repeat it indefinitely, no editor will correct me. It’s all pretty sad. But it’s free. You wouldn’t pay for this low level of overall competence, so you extract the good stuff and move on.

      • 0 avatar
        Asdf

        I have seen this claim before, that somehow the laws of physics would prevent something like a five minute charge from being possible. For all I know, that’s true, but guess what – that means that BEVs are DEAD ON ARRIVAL. Now, think about it, would Tesla, and indeed an entire auto industry, KNOWINGLY bet on a technology that they KNEW from the VERY START was a technological DEAD END? It’s hard to believe, but if it really IS the case, it would be the most stupid decision ever made by the auto industry, and common sense would dictate that the sooner the industry pulls the plug (so to speak) on BEVs, the better, because every single dollar spent on BEVs is a dollar wasted.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Silly Asdf, EV charging is actually faster than fossil fueling. Fossil fueling is an activity where you are dedicated to that single task. EV fueling is something that can be done in parallel with other tasks and in most cases cancels out any time loss. You have 5 minutes of fueling and 5 minutes of another task with fossil cars for a total of 10 minutes. With an EV, both tasks can be accomplished in 5 minutes.

          Wait, 5 minutes EV fueling – is that possible? Yes it is. You can push about 60 miles worth of charge into a Model 3 in 5 minutes which for me is more than enough usually to make it to a destination charger. On the road, you dan’t always need to charge from empty to full. Just enough to make it to the destination with a little to spare.

          Day to day when you’re not on long trips. you never have to worry about charging. For me, the car always has 100% every time I get into it. No stopping for charing. Again, less time spent fueling than with a fossil car. Therefore, fossil cars take more time to fuel than EVs. Asdf, fix your own defects.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @asdf: “Your statement that “EV charging is actually faster than fossil fueling” is blatantly and obviously false. ”

            In simpler terms that maybe you can understand. I plug my car in when I get home. I plug my car in when I get to my office. 90% of the time I don’t even have to take 5 minutes to go someplace and fuel my car. Every time it’s at 100%. It’s ready to go from point to point without stopping without taking 5 minutes to fuel.

            Fossil cars require that you drive somewhere, pump in liquids, and engage in a financial transaction after waiting for someone buying scratch tickets. EVs, most of the time on a day to day basis, require none of that. Garage to garage to garage non-stop.

          • 0 avatar
            Asdf

            @mcs: Even for an EXTREMELY RETARDED individual you’re unusually obtuse. However, you’ve just ADMITTED that you plug your car in when you get home and that you plug your car in when you get to your office. Since the time your BEV spends charging the battery while being plugged in WELL EXCEEDS the five minutes it would have taken to top up the gas tank, you’ve indirectly admitted that you’ve been LYING when you said that “EV charging is actually faster than fossil fueling”, even though you probably don’t have the faculties to realize it or the decency to admit it. You’re still a LIAR, though, and resorting to irrelevant digressions about circumstance (as you’re wont to do) won’t help to conceal this fact.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @conundrum, Here’s a link to ChargePoint’s 500 kW charger. Liquid cooled cables and all.

        https://www.chargepoint.com/products/commercial/express-plus/

        Another trick I’ve used is to use two packs and two charging ports and charging them with separate chargers. Then join them electrically at runtime. Although, not at 500 kW. I suspect that’s what Porsche is going to try with the Taycan and the real purpose of those dual charge ports – probably for racing purposes.

        Another factor ignored in charging rates is fact that batteries and vehicles are getting lighter. With 500 Wh/kg batteries on the horizon and 100’s of little labs promising to blow away that barrier, vehicle efficiency is going to improve. With increased efficiency, you can get by with a smaller capacity battery for a given range and a 300 mile range charge becomes much quicker.

        I think something that many can’t come to grips with is the concept of unattended charging/fueling. It’s multitasking. For me, it means that if I have a gas car and have to fuel it on the way home, it’s 10 minutes dedicated to fueling that car (I have to get away from my commute route to fuel). There is also lets say 10 minutes of time I have to spend reading and responding to emails. With a gas car, the 10 minutes of email happens at home. With an EV, the 10 minutes of emails happens at home too, but I’m home 10 minutes sooner because I can fuel my car at home rather than getting off an exit and dealing with traffic to get to a gas pump, then pumping gas. BTW, I timed this once when my daughter was driving and needed gas. It was at least 10 minutes out of our way total time.

        On a road trip, when I had a gas car, I’d stop to fuel which took time, but also stretch my legs a bit, hit the bathroom, and get something to eat. Maybe the fueling only took 5 minutes, but everything else took about half an hour. With an EV, the car could be fueling in parallel with the other activities and you might even gain 5 minutes by not having to take separate time to fuel the car. That’s why I say and will continue to say that EVs effectively fuel faster than gas cars.

  • avatar
    kwong

    I don’t think Tesla should feel pressured into designing and building generations of the same model car. If it ain’t broken…

    Most manufacturers roll out a new generation model to attract new buyers, attract old buyers, progress, and keep up with the competition. Tesla is niche technology car brand that updates older vehicles through OTA software updates, does minor refreshes, and does continuous revisements to its production components. It costs a lot of money to redesign and unless the old model is fading towards obsolescence, I don’ t see the point in taking the risk of turning a good model into a flop.

    Tesla seems to be following the Mazda Miata, Jeep Wrangler, & VW Golf. Yes there have been multiple generations of each, but the changes are relatively subtle and the older generations serve the same utility that the new ones do.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      While the NA and NB were similar, the NC and ND Miatas were pretty radically different from one another.

      Having said that, there is precedent for the if it ain’t broke approach with many of the luxury marques, such as Mercedes leaving their models in production for long periods of time back in the day.

      On the other hand, it’s an 80k plus car with a design that is best described as handsome, but “long in the tooth”. Really no reason to mess with it though unless the BMWs, Benzes, and traditional luxury marques start stealing more sales.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Like I’ve said before, Tesla is the high-tech version of AMC (bad), or Checker Motors (worse). They’ve spent plenty of money on battery and powertrain technology, but don’t have the money or the resources to do every five year redesigns.

    It’s only a matter of time before they’re overtaken by the traditional manufacturers (the ones that do have the money and the resources) with their own BEVs.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Not a chance. There’s more money in trucks and SUVs, and most mfrs aren’t committed to securing sufficient battery supply to make a dent in Tesla’s market lead.

    • 0 avatar
      markf

      Why chase less than 1% of the market when you can make some nice profits off SUVs/CUVs or full size pickup trucks? I would think the initial investment would be huge for low/no profits. Plus, no other electric car would have the prestige of the Tesla name.

      I am not a fan of Musk but I would like Telsa auto to succeed. I have driven a model 3 and though it is not for me I get the appeal.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Robbie: Ford is on track to become a business that exclusively makes pickup trucks for the US market. Downside: the...
  • ravenuer: Yeah, set up a car sharing thing in Brooklyn, NYC. What could go wrong?
  • SilverCoupe: I have an E-class type car, and I can tell you I never drive from the east coast of the US to Europe....
  • bullnuke: Trouble ahead. Chicago and Brooklyn are about to become “Car-Share Deserts” much similar to the...
  • PrincipalDan: Supposed to make it easier for rally drivers to jump into the car and start it at the same time. What...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States