By on July 8, 2019

2019 Lexus LX 570 front quarter

2019 Lexus LX570

5.7-liter V8 DOHC (383 hp @ 5600 rpm, 403 lb/ft. @ 3600 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

13 city / 18 highway / 15 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

14.1 (observed mileage, MPG)

Base Price: $86,855 US

As Tested: $88,195 US

Prices include $1,025 destination charge in the United States. (2-row LX not available in Canada)

In the beginning, Willys created the sports-utility vehicle. Now, the sports was negligible and the utility was strictly for the military-industrial complex, and darkness was over two continents at war. And when the war ended, Willys said “let there be civilians who want to drink cheap beer and go rock crawling,” and there were knobby tires and lift kits.

Then the off-roaders began to multiply, each taking their own form. And it was good. But then one saw that the fruit of a tree in the garden looked like a half-used bar of soap — this tree, known as the crossover, represents all that is evil.

Lexus has embraced everything within the realm of the sports-utility spectrum. From tiny crossovers to this massive 2019 Lexus LX570, nearly all needs can be covered. But is this biggest Lexus good or evil?

2019 Lexus LX 570 profile

Yes, it’s functionally a Toyota Land Cruiser with Lexus touches. The Land Cruiser, legendary as an indestructible, go-anywhere people-and-stuff carrier, has long been the flagship of Toyota’s lineup. Within Lexus, however, the LX570 seems an afterthought — and interestingly, the two vehicles aren’t that far apart in price.

2019 Lexus LX 570 front

This is probably the worst appearance of Lexus’ predator grille. When applied to a truck of this size, it looks like it can eat small children. Beyond that and the blocky tail, it’s a benign looking beast, but I can’t get past that horrifying grille.

2019 Lexus LX 570 rear

The interior works well — mercifully, the LX uses an up-to-date version of the Lexus infotainment system, which, while by no means perfect, is much better than the clunky touchscreen used on the baby brother GX I tested last fall. I’m still not a fan of the mouse-style control for most audio and navigation functions, but it’s miles better than the older system.

2019 Lexus LX 570 interior

Seating front and rear is perfectly comfortable. I’m a bit surprised that this LX570 is available with the option of either two or three rows of seats — the two rows on my tester make for a cavernous luggage compartment, swallowing everything I could toss while asking for more.

2019 Lexus LX 570 cargo area

With so much mass grounding the LX to the ground, you’d think it’d be an incredible highway cruiser. And while the ride is sublime, the steering requires a great deal of correction to maintain a lane on anything but glass-smooth tarmac. Plus, the mileage is not good. Sure, you’re moving 5800 pounds with a 383-hp V8, so you wouldn’t expect Prius-level efficiency, but my drive time included more highway time than I usually encounter. Rather than approaching the EPA highway estimate, I barely met the city numbers with a 14.1-mpg average.

2019 Lexus LX 570 front seat

Honestly, I’d love to see some of the hybrid technology that Toyota/Lexus have perfected trickle up to their larger vehicles. I’d have to believe that a significant impact could be made if the LX, GX, Tundra, and Land Cruiser had some electrons moving their mass.

2019 Lexus LX 570 rear seat

I’m struggling to picture the market for the LX570. Perhaps this will attract an owner who needs the cachet of a luxury marque at the country club or at the office yet needs to haul a horse trailer or a boat on weekends. But none of these functions focus on the core excellence of the Land Cruiser platform within — off-road superiority. The light, vague steering that helps whilst rock crawling makes interstate drives more of a chore than needed.

2019 Lexus LX 570 center stack

Oddly, the LX570 can tow 7000 pounds, while the very similar Land Cruiser is rated at 8100 pounds. 1100 pounds doesn’t sound like much, but it can make a difference if you’re looking at travel trailers, enclosed race trailers, or a longer boat.

For the off-road fanatics, check out the suspension articulation at the, ahem, off-road park — better known as a mostly abandoned shopping mall.

2019 Lexus LX 570 articulation

I’m sure there are a few crazies out there who will happily wheel their $88,195 luxury SUV out in the wilderness, and for those, I’m certain that you’ll be satisfied. The only true sin I found is gluttony — it’s so thirsty! But, you say, first cast out the beam of thine own eye, and you’re right. I’m afraid that my brief foray in mall crawling is a more realistic representation of the life of a Lexus LX, and for this, it is less than ideal.

2019 Lexus LX 570 rear quarter

[Images: © 2019 Chris Tonn]

 

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84 Comments on “2019 Lexus LX570 – Deep Within the Garden...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    “14.1 (observed mileage, MPG)”

    Nice.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Folks, this is why they invented crossovers, everybody loves the SUV until it gets to mileage, enter crossover. Nothing has changed

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Crossovers aren’t even in the same arena as SUVs, there’s not a single crossover sold today that could handle 25% of what this truck can take.

        Crossovers are the worst of all worlds, but because manufacturers make money hand over fist selling minivans with 4 doors for SUV money, they’ll continue selling to the idiots buying them.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          People who buy crossovers could care less about “what this truck can handle,” just as someone who buys a V-8 Mustang could care less “what this car can do on a track.” That doesn’t make the Mustang buyer an idiot.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Tell that to the people tearing up unibody crossovers on potholes because they think their FWD minivan has SUV capability. And yes I’ve seen this on more than one occasion in my town, twice as a right on red where trucks and SUVs drop into a 1 foot deep crater off the asphalt to pass other cars. In one case it was a Jeep Compass sitting on its frame with one tire dipping into the hole.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            ” tearing up unibody crossovers on potholes”

            What?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            jmo, I have no idea what point he’s trying to make, aside from the usual “what I like is best and anyone who doesn’t agree is an idiot” stuff that he posts.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’m not really sure what’s difficult to understand, putting a vehicle into an application it’s not designed for causes damage that a vehicle designed to handle similar situations does not endure.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            This November will mark 40 years of “applying” FWD sedans in all kinds of places with winter climates and s*itty road maintenance. None of them suffered any kind of major damage because of potholes.

            But I suppose I’m lucky. And I’m sure that no pickup truck or full size SUV has ever suffered pothole damage. Right?

            Again, I have no idea what point you’re trying to make

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I never questioned the attributes of FWD cars, they’re great for cheap transportation. But comparing a FWD crossover to a BOF SUV is a far reach. A Suzuki Samurai was a compact SUV capable of going off-road, a Jeep Compass/Cherokee/Renegade is a unibody FWD car. Both vehicles were/are sold as off-road vehicles, do you not see the issue? Both the BOF and crossovers have similar fuel economy averages on fuelly, yet only one is actually capable.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I think your “issue” is that people are buying stuff that you wouldn’t.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I wish we did have small cheap SUVs, a first gen Blazer like vehicle would be perfect, even with 1987 tech mine can get 23-24 on the highway.
          Modern tech in a small SUV could easily hit 30mpg without losing capability.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          What I meant about crossovers as opposed to SUVs is that people think they’re equal, because most people won’t tow anything or take it off-road, but ride height, AWD and carrying capacity is the same as an SUV, but much easier on gas. Crossovers generally ride and handle much better as well

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Totally disagree. I bet the Telluride, Pilot, Highlander and Ascent can handle 80%+ of what this can do.

          Meanwhile, the front end is hideous. And from everything I’ve seen in tony parts of town, the Landcruiser holds plenty of cachet at the country club unless you’re new money. Old money prefers stealth.

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            This thing is ugly from any angle. The interior is nice but way too busy. The gas mileage figures would put an Escalade to shame.
            This is for upper middle class women who think a high price means that it’s valuable.
            Lexus has lost its way.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        At 12,000 miles per year and $3/gallon, it’s about a $750 annual difference in fuel costs between this and a 20 mpg crossover.

        It’s not nothing, but it’s less than one lease payment for this baby. I doubt it’s swinging too many purchase decisions.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I just got back from a trip that involved a fair amount of 4-LOW beach driving. Of the three off-road vehicles we brought for the task, only one of them has ever averaged 14 mpg for an entire tank of gas. The V8 Dakota and V10 F350? Nope. Was fuel consumption a topic of discussion on the trip? Not that I can remember. Did anyone ask for gas money for their guzzling trucks that were used to carry a total of ten people on the beach every day? Nope. Gas just isn’t a meaningful expense. Throwing away a vehicle over turbo/HPFP/carbon burned valves/Rube Goldberg transmission failure will be a meaningful one though.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Gas just isn’t a meaningful expense.”

            It is a consideration to fleets. The company my brother works for buys 100’s of pickups at a time. They look at fuel economy.
            Commercial transport trucks saw aerodynamic improvements decades ago due to reduced fuel costs.
            I consider fuel costs since I have to shift where my disposable income gets spent as fuel costs fluctuate. I’m not going to go out and buy a more fuel efficient vehicle right now since my truck is paid off. I won’t buy a replacement that gets worse mpg. I’d take more vacation road trips if it didn’t cost me $400 a pop.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “Throwing away a vehicle over turbo/HPFP/carbon burned valves/Rube Goldberg transmission failure will be a meaningful one though.”

            As someone mentioned above it’s $750 extra a year vs. 20mpg. When any of the parade of horribles you mentioned happens in 8 years, you’ll have spent $6k extra on gas. Most of the things you’ve mentioned can be fixed for far less than $6k.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Lou_BC,

            I meant more in the context of a vehicle with real off road capabilities used for recreation. Gas didn’t matter on our trip where other costs amounted to hundreds per day per person. At my current local gas price, $400 of unleaded would take this $90K SUV 2,256 miles. Maybe it’s time to find your own Donald Trump.

            jmo,

            Fun for you to say, but that $6K in fuel cost means that when the $90K SUV buyer gets a shiny new one, the guy who buys it for $35K won’t have his budget decimated by a $5K expense, or more likely two of them. That’s why this will be worth $35K in seven years while Cayennes that age are one skipped oil change from the junkyard. The oil change gets skipped because the BHPH ghetto fabulous new owner can’t afford to have it done on the $6K Porsche that they just financed for 104 weekly payments of $100.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Safe to say someone who’s spending 90 large on a luxury 4X4 isn’t going to be overly concerned about fuel economy.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Still 13 City MPG made me giggle a little. Sorry Toyota.

            It’s not like it’s a Lamborghini or John Deere. Eventually the BHPH 3rd owner, single mother of 5 will go: wtf???

  • avatar
    jh26036

    The profile of the LX is much nicer than the LC variant. They really should just combine this with the front end of a 2008 Toyota LC and it would be a fantastic match.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    That’s the first high end interior that looks like a high end interior that I’ve seen in a while. What sort of infotainment does the Land Cruiser have? I want a 2020 anniversary LC in a very bad way.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    Horrible inside and out.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Interior soft touch materials that looked like used wax paper at the last autoshow it was so worn. The value isn’t that great either.

      A new Land Cruiser is $76K while an Escalade is $64K on cars dot com. While a 2009 with less than150,000 miles the LC is $26K and a Escalade is $17K.  A new LX570 3-row is $92K while a 2009 is $27K.

      So the LC drops $50K and the Escalade only drops $48K.  Toyota LC is not luxurious and should not have that depreciation compared to another luxury marque.the LX is more like a luxury vehicle in it’s high depreciation of $65 in the last decade.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Is that how you really want to compare the GM junk you shill for to Toyotas? By resale value? Thanks for the laugh.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        LOL @ norm with his mental math.

        Sorry the Chinesium-encrusted GM fullsizers are absolutely disposable as far as quality of materials is concerned, if not durability in general (GM still did okay on the GMT900s there).

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Even granting him his optimistic and cherry picked numbers, the Cruiser depreciates 66% in 10 years, vs. 74% for the Escalade.

          Next take a look at the 20 year numbers.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I did take a look at a 2015 or 2016 Yukon Denali with 64,000 miles on it the other day, just for grins and giggles. I was not impressed with the interior materials, which supposedly are nicer than the Tahoe Premier and Yukon SLT.

          I think the GM SUVs feel very phoned-in, and am interested in whether or not they’ll do better with the 2020/2021 redesign.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            A couple of weeks ago, my daughter and I checked out an Escalade Platinum parked next to a Navigator Black Label on the lot at Carmax. The Lincoln was far better finished – it wasn’t even close.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            They’re both junk. At least GM spends your money on decent mechanicals. The Ford is a better place to wait for a tow truck though.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        The Toyota LC isn’t luxurious? It’s the same vehicle as this sans wood and Napa leather.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Does one really care about mpg when you can afford an $88,000.00 SUV.

    Somehow I don’t think so.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Pouring $150 of gas into it every week might get tiresome.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        These are second and third cars for the most part. Besides, it wouldn’t get as tiresome as plugging in every night.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          True. That 10 seconds a day that I spend plugging and unplugging my EV really takes it out of me.

          I especially miss standing out in the freezing snow while dodging other people’s coffee dumps, tobacco spit, and gasoline spills, or waiting for them to return to their car after buying lottery tickets and cigarettes before moving away from the pump.

          Even the Lexus driver gets to enjoy these amenities.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I procure almost all of my gasoline from Costco, where I have yet to experience any of the hardships you mention.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “These are second and third cars for the most part. Besides, it wouldn’t get as tiresome as plugging in every night.”

          Why would they be a second or third car? I suppose if your 1st was an EV as well. Range is good on most cars now. A 240 to 320 mile range car is good as a primary car. A Model 3 has 250 kW charging now, so not long to charge if you have to go long distance.

          Model 3’s are getting common around Boston. Seems like any time you go out you see at least a couple of them on the road. I even saw quite a few when I took my 85k mile Leaf from Boston’s northern suburbs to central Vermont. Yeah, I had to get a single 20-minute charge halfway, but I survived okay. A Model 3 will do the round trip non-stop.

          As for plugging in, it’s actually easier than plugging in a phone. A quick one-hand operation. The nice thing about it is that it’s always full. No early morning surprise range anxiety like you get with an ICE when you’re running late and realize you don’t have the range to make it where you are going. In fact, some times my daughter uses that as an excuse not to drive. “I’m low on gas dad, could you drive?” She has her eye on the Leaf now and want’s it once I get the Tesla.

          On top of everything else, you don’t have to deal with the miserable torque lag that you get with an ICE.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            “I procure almost all of my gasoline from Costco”

            Top tier fuels and the best price in town (usually by 20 cents a gallon here in Indiana). They’re definitely the place to go.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Just about every Costco I have seen in the GTA selling gas has a line-up so long that you burn more fuel waiting in line than the money you save getting it slightly cheaper.

            The cost of fuel is not something anybody in this price range should concern themselves over. However for others, it is a major factor in their vehicle purchase.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I go to the Costco in Norfolk, Virginia most often. I’ve yet to wait for more than one car to finish pumping, and usually I’m surrounded by a mixture of vehicles that range from middle class to well over $100K. Maybe wealthy people go there because it is an island of civilization in Norfolk.

            I wouldn’t be surprised if most LX570s are in multiple Lexus families. If you don’t have a relationship with your Lexus dealer, it is ever so much more stylish to drive a Land Cruiser. That being said, if you’re rolling in it and don’t have too much dignity to accept a hand-out, this would be an excellent complement to a Tesla Model S.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            Another advantage of being retired…I hit COSTCO during the early afternoon, not much action at the gas pumps and the food samples are at peak delivery.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I end up going on weekends usually. I have to admit that most of the Costcos I’ve been to outside of Norfolk are nicer, but there are commonalities. The worst thing about the one I go to is that the line for the Café is usually too long for me to grab a slice of pizza.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            I’m a recent Costco convert, motivated by a need for cheap diapers initially). Between the cheap gas and their credit card that gets me 4% off (ALL gas stations) on top of that, I’m a huge fan. I hate how busy it seems to always be unless I go at a truly odd hour like 8pm on a weeknight, but I can’t argue with the deals.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    I have this bad feeling that, unless a conference room in a local Hampton Inn is reserved and a major intervention is performed with the Lexus designers buried in a couch, that in a generation or two, the entire front of every Lexus will be a Predator grille with tiny strips of lights hanging on for dear life passing for headlights. Stop the madness!

    ToddAtlas – 100% agree. You can see where the money went. Even just by zooming in the pictures, quality stitching, leather, and switchgear – it’s all there. It’s hampered a bit by the platform, and the curse of Toyota trucks’ low seating positions – take a look at the back seat and the floor – but this looks to be more than lipstick on a pig. They actually went a bit further, but having the excellent Land Cruiser to base this on had to help a lot!

    Just ditch the front. Now.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Personally I can’t believe that many if any North American consumers who purchase one of these new would take it off road.

    Perhaps a smart 3rd owner who might be able to get it for Land Cruiser pricing?

    And again I am guessing that Lexus would have seen lighter use and received more regular maintenance than a comparable LC?

    I had a client who leased one of these as his 2nd vehicle the other being a 911. The Lexus was for ski trips, golf excursions etc. Carried everything, even through bad weather but still was acceptable at the Country Club and private ski club.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I know two people who use an LX and a GX like wheelbarrows on their horse farms. It hurts me to see what they do to the interiors, but the Lexus SUVs stand up to the abuse quite well. The guy with the GX also has an RX that he sunk in a bog. It caused some sort of short in the driver’s door that created a hard to diagnose draw, but otherwise the harm was cosmetic.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I guess that ‘there is one born every minute’. A pickup or a L.C. are both better suited for that type of use. The major reasons for purchasing a 570 instead of one of those are a) The ‘luxury’ interior. Which would take a beating if used as a wheelbarrow and therefore is actually a disadvantage in that application. b) Having a Lexus badge. Which is great at the Country Club or when getting service, but no advantage in a field.

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          What Todd posted doesn’t surprise me in the slightest. I used to sell hay to the horsey people and they are “unusual” to say the least.

          I didn’t deliver and would state “cash and carry” meaning (please listen carefully) folding U.S. currency and YOU haul it. They’d drive up and I’d do a walk-around before loading. Their vehicles and trailers almost as a rule were rusted-out crashes waiting to happen and I would refuse to load (horse trailers especially as horse pi$$ is very corrosive). I didn’t want to be an accessory to manslaughter or sued to oblivion. And half would bring a checkbook despite the firm warning. Anyone that has dealt with them learns to NEVER accept a check as it’ll be made of the finest insufficient-funds rubber. The gnashing of teeth was epic when they didn’t get their way.

          I finally gave up on them and sold to the dairy farmers even though their price point was lower. Using a Lexus as a field truck seems oddly in character.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Some horse people are just totally insane. I would say that both of the ones I referred to qualify, as the GX/RX guy funds a charity that brings terrorists into the country and the woman with LX is a walking dirt clot member of the landed gentry.

            I’ve got an ex-gf whose family was constantly trying to trick her into a forced marriage in Syria and broke up with me because I wasn’t ambitious enough when I was an IT consultant to Bear Stearns in Manhattan and she was a 26 year old undergrad at UVA. About twenty years later, she still lives on the horse farm her daddy had bought her then where she now teaches riding to other spoiled rich girls and I’ve made enough to retire twice in different career fields. I believe she could always pay for the hay for the two $70K a pop events horses her father bought her. Those horses were so well trained that they could make me look like I knew what I was doing on horseback. Considering I once created many an old money legend by attempting to fake being a polo player, that’s saying something.

            In my mid-20s, I crewed a Hinckley sailing yacht for a venture capitalist who sold off his private jets but retained an old airliner for carrying his retired thoroughbreds back and forth between Connecticut and Palm Beach Polo. For his own use, he chartered whatever the biggest plane was that could land where he was going.

            I watched another horsey fool in a documentary talk about how ‘the American public’ wants the government to commit to wild horse welfare at the expense of many Americans’ way of life and most of our diets. Wild horses in the US are a luxury we can’t afford and that nobody who works for a living cares enough to pay for. They’re an introduced species, or at the very least a re-introduced one after many thousands of years of absence. The animal lovers(most likely literally) are well on their way to destroying horse racing via infiltration, and when they’re done we’ll need precisely as many horses as there are reality-deprived spoiled rich girls.

            My college roommate had horses, but he was also a dairy farmer. His family had 1,300 acres on Lake Anna, even then worth an unimaginable amount as building lots instead of cow patties. It was on his farm that I flipped a horse I was trying to help break, applying my college driving style to the equestrian world.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I know the GX and RX guy bought them new and abuses them as much as possible. He was a Detroit and German customer and wanted to see if he could really buy Lexuses and not have to trade them in every two years. I don’t know if the LX woman bought it new. It looks like it’s run five Camel trophies though.

          • 0 avatar
            Tele Vision

            The minute you buy a cow you’re making money. The minute you buy a horse you’re losing money. We have many horsists around here, too. They ( invariably women at the helms of Dodge dually trucks with $150,000 air-conditioned gooseneck trailers in tow – with one horse onboard, loaded at the rear for uneasy vehicle handling and easy washboard generation ) are worse drivers than the golfers, as the horse fanciers need to get their babies to whatever the Hell one does with a horse RIGHT NOW! Strange that I’ve only rarely seen one ridden around here. I’ve often stymied a request for a horse by stating that we can’t afford a dually and a trailer and the time to drive them around all weekend, which they apparently require.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    “I’m struggling to picture the market for the LX570.”

    -Someone who appreciates the unique virtues of the Land Cruiser and wants better on-road manners at the cost of the last 10% of offroad capability. The reason for the lower tow rating is the softer suspension.

    “Perhaps this will attract an owner who needs the cachet of a luxury marque at the country club or at the office yet needs to haul a horse trailer or a boat on weekends.”

    -This person already has a leather lined 3/4 ton diesel at home for that purpose. The LX is for their wife.

    “Honestly, I’d love to see some of the hybrid technology that Toyota/Lexus have perfected trickle up to their larger vehicles.”

    -Please god no.

    • 0 avatar

      You know I actually do see these lugging ski boats and horses around CT. While some wealthy people around here do buy top trim pickups, lots of the say professional job type wealthy (lawyers DR’s etc) seem to use fullsize SUVs for truck things.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    The lack of two solid axles is really the only downfall to this vehicle. Otherwise this is the pinnacle of automotive luxury and design, I would say outclassing even handmade Rolls. I can’t think of a single better vehicle sold today or within the last 15 years to spend that kind of money on.
    Despite the lack of solid axles I would love to own one, even used. The next best thing to this is the other Japanese SUV coming out of Japan, the 4Runner and platform mate.

    I hope they build these for a long time to come because I don’t believe the world will ever get another vehicle that combines the luxury, reliability, functionality, versatility, and downright class of this truck ever again.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Love the pic at the shopping mall, Chris.

    If I were in the market for something like this – and, for the record, if that happens, start looking for “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” pods lurking about – this is what I’d buy, grille notwithstanding. And I’d buy it for the build quality, which is remarkable.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    This is it, for those looking for an SUV that will last the next 20 years you can’t beat it. So, you’ve got kids, a boat, a cabin in the mountains, a travel trailer, assorted other towable goodies have we got the vehicle for you and by today’s standards $88K isn’t awful

  • avatar
    ajla

    Compared to the GX it doesn’t seem worth the $30K jump, but then again I don’t make $90K SUV money.

    • 0 avatar

      Toyota prices all their truck items at Because We Can level.

      Interesting thing is how the LC and LX have reached price parity over the past decade. And that wasn’t the case before. So is the LX now a bit better value, or are people just paying that much more for the LC?

      • 0 avatar

        I used to see more of the LX then LC but over the last 5 years I see more LC. Neither is all that common around here. See more Range rovers and top trim Tahoes and Suburbans.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        “Toyota prices all their truck items at Because We Can level.”

        If you look at how they’re made compared to their competitors, it is hard to support this opinion. A Land Cruiser’s axles, bearings, hardware, brake components, and hydraulic lines make a Bugatti look like a Yugo. If this car is overpriced, a Mercedes or Lincoln should be free.

  • avatar
    mrwiizrd

    I see several of these on the road every day. This is the SUV of choice for the wealthy moms shuttling their brood to the private schools and lacrosse practices in and around Denver’s poshest neighborhoods.

    Land Cruisers are rare, but these things are really popular because we get a handful of snow days when the private schools close and practice is cancelled and no one of means drives anywhere.

    The perfect tool for the job of projecting ones stealth wealth status.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I too live in the Denver burbs, south east side if you will. The Lexus SUV’s and Tesla are so common around here it is absurd, the charter school pick up lines look like a Lexus dealership is moving inventory to the school parking lot.

      No joke, we even have a very nice lady (I presume) sporting a new Lamborghini Urus. I was next to her at a stop light coming in to the ‘hood’, Jeebus the front brakes on that thing are huge.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I want to like these but they sure aren’t making it easier.

    Lexus styling is not only still horrendous but each subsequent iteration is even worse. At least there’s still the Toyota version.

    The Tundra V8 isn’t special anymore. GM trucks are Chinese garbage now but the 6200 is a reason to want one anyway. The 3.5 in the Navigator is even better if you can settle for six. Even the Datsun knockoff doesn’t give anything up under the hood.

    The economy part of fuel economy is irrelevant but the 24 gallon US market gas tank sure isn’t. Getting gas every 5 days would be a real pain in the rear. Overseas Land Cruisers have a secondary tank behind the rear axle with another 12 gallons.

    At the end of the day if it were my money I’d buy a truck, and I did, but if I couldn’t the Chevy is the only big SUV that I’d buy this one ahead of.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      An Armada makes a pretty strong argument for itself in the face of $85k Land Cruisers. Engine is every bit as potent (although you could argue the Toyota’s non-DI motor will be more durable ultimately), unless you’re towing or doing serious offroad the Nissan IRS will handle better and gives a better third row, and the interior build quality of the J-VIN Armada is about 90% of an LC, at 60% of the price (or less, if you shop around). I say this as a hardcore 4WD Toyota guy.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    “The interior works well — mercifully, the LX uses an up-to-date version of the Lexus infotainment system, which, while by no means perfect…”

    This bit came as point 2, right after impressions were offered concerning the exterior appearance.

    No disrespect intended toward this reviewer or TTAC, but isn’t fascinating that infotainment systems have taken such a prominent position in our process of evaluating vehicles…..even above the more visceral impressions about power and driving pleasure?

  • avatar
    R Henry

    The term “SUV” really doesn’t apply to these anymore. Vehicles such as these have simply replaced luxury sedans for a large segment of buyers who find even full sized sedans (S Class, 7 Series, etc) too small. These are simply upsized luxury cars. “More is better” in vehicular form. This is how they are viewed in the market and this is how they are used.

    Let’s drop the “S” and the “U” and keep it real. These are simply Double-XL luxury “cars” now.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I’d had my eye on one of these for a long time, and this spring my BMW dealership took a lightly used 2017 in trade and so I called my BMW guy and the wife and I went and drove it. I have no doubt it’s one of, if not the best built vehicle today, but for us it was cramped and handled like the bloated pig that it is.

    Went and test drove a new Navigator right after and what a revelation. Roomy, hard charging acceleration and much better handling. Took away all desire we’ve ever had for a Land Cruiser or LX570.

  • avatar
    James2

    “Within Lexus, however, the LX570 seems an afterthought…”

    Lexus is being held hostage by Toyota’s usual, glacial, erosion-happens-faster approach towards redesigning its trucks. (Same with the Toyota store across the street. The Sequoia is as old as the trees its named after.)

    But… I bet its dealer body really wishes it had something more like the Navigator or Escalade.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    What an utterly hideous vehicle, both outside and inside.

    I like full-size SUVs (currently drive a high mileage 2007 Mercedes-Benz GL320 CDI 4Matic), but this Lexus is a stylistic nightmare. 14 mpg is roughly 16.5 L per 100 km, which seems quite decent for such a hefty brute of a truck, though. It is still terrible fuel economy but it is to be expected given the weight and powerful engine combination.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Some luxury $85K vehicle that doesn’t even have a straight ahead relaxed feeling on the highway with constant steering corrections needed. What a buy.

    I couldn’t care less whether it has a real luxury interior and will last like a blacksmith’s anvil. Luxury to me is a properly sorted suspension and steering so that I do not have to concentrate on driving it when all I want is a fuss-free highway drive.

    If it’s a dog to drive, who cares about the rest? This one also looks like a dog’s breakfast. What a deal!

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I’ve not experienced any highway wandering in the LXs and LCs that I’ve driven. The alignment specification for the LX570 calls for between 2.6 and 4.1 degrees of caster. You need power assistance to not go straight down the road. But it’s cool. The best thing about these cars is who doesn’t drive them.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Lexus (and Toyota) exterior’styling (and interior design/materials) are an embarrassment, and a septic pox on what once mighty stalwart of refinement, tasteful elegance, and immaculate materials/build quality.

    Oh my how the once mighty Toyota has fallen.

    Akio Toyoda should feel’compelled to perform seppuku in the largest forum of Toyota City in front of all Toyota Motor Company employees. He has shamed his ancestors.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    What we have here folks is an 80 year old coming in to receive the face of a 20 year old and the rear end of a 40 year old. You can still see the old – and I mean old – bits of a former Toyoduh that has not adapted well to the cosmetic foolishness of the Lexus corporate look. While the product may still be one that can handle the outdoors well (thanks to the ancient Toyoduh underpinnings), this is an unremarkable product built to show off snob appeal rather than actual buying knowledge. The Toyoduh is less ugly (yes, less ugly) and is the one that should be purchased. At least you’ll not be a snob and you’ll have at least bought based on capability over pretentiousness.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Give the difference in price between the LC and the 570 – I don’t know why anyone would buy the LC. The Lexus dealer experience is worth the difference on its own and when you’re paying this much money for a vehicle, another $5K to $10K (or the difference in lease payment) isn’t all that much.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    “I barely met the city numbers with a 14.1-mpg average.”

    What a joke, I had 3000 lbs of boat behind my 2007 ‘Hoe running in “3” last weekend and I got that mileage.

    The exterior styling is an absolute mess. Cohesive & well proportioned it’s not. Who would spend $90K to drive something this ugly & underpowered???? Just get a Yukon Denail w/6.2 and drive a real truck.


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