By on June 25, 2019

2019 Buick Envision front quarter

2019 Buick Envision AWD Premium II

2.0-liter turbocharged inline four, DOHC (252 hp @ 5,500 rpm, 295 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm)

Nine-speed automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

20 city / 25 highway / 22 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

11.7 city / 9.4 highway / 10.7 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

21.7 (observed mileage, MPG)

Base Price: $44,595 US / $51,295 CAD

As Tested: $49,925 US / $59,160 CAD

Prices include $995 destination charge in the United States and $1,995 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Around these digital pages, Buick gets a bad rap. Some have negative connotations of Buick as an old person’s car (disclaimer, my paternal grandfather was a Buick man) or hold grudges simply because the brand was continued while Oldsmobile and Pontiac were killed off during the Great Recession (disclaimer, my father was an Oldsmobile man), seems few have good things to say about the division from Flint.

Disclaimer: I hate the theme music from Buick’s TV commercials.

Let’s make a deal, then. Let’s try and ignore the badges on this 2019 Buick Envision for a few minutes. Let’s evaluate this entry-level luxury crossover against the competition, rather than against whatever demons lurk within our collective subconscious.

2019 Buick Envision profile

Since we last looked at the Envision about two years ago, the compact crossover has seen a couple of tweaks to the nose and tail, tightening up the somewhat saggy look of the pre-facelift model. And while we tested the base 2.5-liter engine back then, now we have the uprated 2.0-liter turbo, which lends 252 horsepower and an impressive 295 lb-ft of torque to move this hefty tall wagon with verve.

2019 Buick Envision front

Mind you, the Envision makes no efforts to emphasize performance. In the long tradition of mid-range, near-luxury marques everywhere, this Buick is soft. Soft leather, (mostly) soft-touch plastics, and soft, compliant suspension. It’s quiet, and the driver’s hands will be similarly quiet with minimal feedback. The nine-speed automatic transmission shifts nearly imperceptibly. It’s not a bug but a feature – the Envision is simply playing the luxury side of the crossover card.

2019 Buick Envision rear

While I’d never expect the Envision to grace museums as a paragon of design, it’s moderately attractive in an inoffensive manner. The ridge rising from below the side mirror, through each door handle, to terminate in the tail lamp visually lengthens the car, making it look larger than it really is.

The interior is, with one significant exception, inoffensively attractive and purposeful. I’m delighted by the wireless charging slot aft of the shifter, which grips one’s phone vertically with enough force to discourage those “quick glances” at Twitter or the like. The standard 8-inch touchscreen with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay works effortlessly.

2019 Buick Envision interior

Seat comfort is excellent front and rear, though the kids had a bit less legroom in the rear than in similarly sized crossovers I’ve tested. While seated normally, the kids had no problems, but their restless shifting as a road journey stretches beyond an hour put tween knees into mom and dad’s backs. Heated seats front and rear were appreciated, and the ventilated front seats were nice since a week in Ohio can allow one to experience at least three seasons with little warning.

2019 Buick Envision dashboard

The glaring pimple on the face of the Envision’s interior is the vast swath of hard plastic atop the dashboard unconvincingly finished to look like some sort of wood. Seriously – the vinyl woodgrain applied to the 1983 Chrysler LeBaron Town & Country convertible I saw at Cars and Coffee last weekend was more realistic. This is not good, and should be replaced by soft-touch plastics if not covered with leather.

2019 Buick Envision front seat

Cargo space is about what one would expect from the class, though the cargo area feels a bit narrow with more intrusion by the wheel wells than I typically see from the competition. I’ll grant that I was taken aback by the chrome levers atop those wheel wells – they looked like (and probably are) repurposed interior door handles. They allow for a one-touch collapse of the second-row seatback from the rear, for when you’ve accidentally bought too much stuff. I’ve been there.

2019 Buick Envision rear seat

My biggest concern with the Envision is the lack of value. This loaded tester stickers for just under fifty thousand dollars, putting it against luxury models that have more room, better comfort, and better features for roughly the same price. Using the build-and-price tool at Buick.com to create a minimum-viable Envision (with the 2.0-liter turbo and all-wheel drive), I’m only able to step one trim level down to the Premium package, which loses navigation (meh, I’ve got Android Auto), cooled seats (this I’d miss), the heads-up display (I can manage). The only option I’ve added was extra-cost Satin Steel Metallic for $495, because the only no-cost paint is white. Delivered, that Envision stickers for $42,390 – which is much more palatable.

2019 Buick Envision cargo area

A more attractive offer sits at the bottom of the page – $4,750 in cash allowances appear for me in Ohio, your mileage may vary. I don’t talk much about incentives or local market deals when I review cars, since these numbers vary from day to day, dealer to dealer, and place to place. But Buick has long relied on incentives to draw buyers, and here the Envision brings the discussion into yet another realm I try to avoid: geopolitics. The B&B will heatedly discuss their concerns about labor regarding the Envision’s final assembly point, but for me, I’d be watching whether incentives dry up if trade disputes lead to further tariffs from China.

That doesn’t answer the question you’ve surely come here to read – would I buy the Buick Envision?

It’s a tough one. At $50k for the car I drove, no. There are too many compelling alternatives at that price. At $37k for a lesser trim with a bunch of cash on the hood? I’d certainly envision myself looking once again at this Buick.

2019 Buick Envision rear quarter

[Images: © 2019 Chris Tonn/TTAC]

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144 Comments on “2019 Buick Envision Review – Is That a Buick?...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    The styling is inoffensive and forgettable. GM’s decision to build it in China is not.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Yeah. It’s not like this is a Cruze where they can claim there isn’t enough money in it. This is a very profitable class of vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Hank

      I asked a friend who sells Buicks if they had any pushback from their customers on these being built in China…he didn’t even know they were, and he’d been to the GM training on the vehicle. They are popular in our small town, and mostly among those who buy Buicks *specifically* because they are “American”. I’m surprised Buick has been able to hide this so well.

      As to the plastic wood, that’s precisely what does make this a real Buick, at last since the ’60s. lol

      • 0 avatar
        Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

        “[Envisions] are popular in our small town, and mostly among those who buy Buicks *specifically* because they are “American”. I’m surprised Buick has been able to hide this so well.”

        I find that both utterly disgusting and completely believable. I wonder how those buyers would feel if they discovered (or were told) the truth.

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          Most don’t care anymore. I live in an area where the vast majority are prior military and profess great patriotism. We all know China is neither friend or ally, and actively is seeking to match (or exceed) America both economically and militarily. It guts me that folks are buying these in enough numbers to be noticed, and have zero clue as to where they are assembled. Walk up to any of them, ask them if they know that their vehicle was built solely in China and they usually are floored. Of course GM is not advertising this. Why would they? Mom, dad, baseball and apple pie and all, don’t you know?

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            All they have to do is go up to the vehicle and read the Monroney sticker (“Final assembly point”), or the sticker (government-mandated, IIRC) that details the source and percent of content in the vehicle.

            Or are the dealers taking those stickers off (especially the content sticker), to try to hide this information?

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          I haven’t had the heart to tell the woman who sings in my church choir with me about the provenance of her Envasion! Guaranteed she wouldn’t like it!

          It’s amazing how Bruick has been able to keep this quiet—it should be all over the news!

          • 0 avatar

            “It’s amazing how Bruick has been able to keep this quiet”

            May be because except of TTAC lunatics no one cares where car or phone or TV set is made. I do not certainly. I have no idea where my Fusion is made even though I know it is made by Ford somewhere on American continent.

        • 0 avatar
          Ol Shel

          Doesn’t Honda make the car with the most US content? There really is no ‘American car’ anymore. ANd consumers really don’t care. They may say that they do, but in the end, everyone chooses savings over patriotism.

      • 0 avatar
        Raevoxx

        I spent the last few minutes going to various Buick dealer sites in the area, and it looks like the Monroney stickers are either in a different format, or they are showing what THEIR version of the “window sticker” is. Because their version doesn’t say or show anything about parts content, final build, etc.

        If they DO get standard Monroney stickers, same as any other car, then it should clearly show that it’s a Chinese vehicle. They’ve just failed to notice, glossed over it, don’t believe what they are reading, or simply don’t care.

      • 0 avatar
        redgolf

        Hank – It’s the same knowledge most lack about the Encore being built in Korea, I broke the code of ethics when I leased an Encore knowing that’s where it was built, at least they have a union there, I think!

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        That’s just amazing, especially since it’s right there on the window sticker for the final assembly location. Wow.

        If I was spending this kind of money on a CUV/SUV, I’d buy a Mexican built Tiguan. Still made in a foreign land, but at least you get a 6/72 warranty.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Same here, I see a lot of older folks driving them in farm country. I assume based out of sheer ignorance. It’s a perfect vehicle for the demographic in terms of size, I just wish GM built them here.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        If you go back to the ’60s you’ll find that the early Rivieras used real wood veneer, as did the Pontiac Grand Prix.

        • 0 avatar
          RedRocket

          Even in the early ’70s, Pontiac used real wood veneer on some of their higher-end model dashes. Unfortunately the problem with it is that is delaminates and splits in a relatively short number of years and looks like crap. Piano-black plastic or shiny plasti-wood like this are both equally bad. I expect the next big thing to be the return of metal-look plastic but not the silver faux-aluminum used in the ’80s/’90s – maybe a brushed dark bronze instead. And then there is always the ever-popular fake carbon fiber.

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      “The styling is inoffensive and forgettable.”

      Personally, I’d call it “tasteful and understated”. Imo the entire Buick lineup is better looking than most of the competition. Too bad about the crap GM quality…

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      Let China build cars, and then let the Chinese buy our Iphones, medical technology, movies, and let them send their kids to American universities… who will be better off here, China or America?

      • 0 avatar
        scott25

        Too bad China already makes our iPhones, medical technology, and funds our movies…

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        Highly qualified US students often lose their spots at elite American colleges because the schools offer inflated pricing to Chinese applicants…and the Chinese pay it.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @RHenry: “because the schools offer inflated pricing to Chinese applicants…and the Chinese pay it”

          Uh, no. That’s not the reason. Take a look at this article. I personally avoided the whole sports obsession thing with my kids. They ended up at elite schools without a problem. Lots of Asians and Asian-Americans at those graduations, but plenty of non-Asians. I doubt any of us, regardless of race, spent much time shuttling our kids from practice to practice on weekends.

          https://www.businessinsider.com/why-chinese-children-are-better-at-math-than-americans-2017-9

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “Uh, no. That’s not the reason.”

            Yes, it absolutely is. Consider reading up a bit on the massive cheating that goes on on these foreign entrance exams ( as well as BSing through language competency testing). Colleges are happy to get that sweet full tuition, less concerned with saddling native students with Chinese and Korean kids with a barely functional grasp of English on team assignments.

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            This piece conforms with my own experience:

            https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/05/american-universities-are-addicted-to-chinese-students/394517/

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “Highly qualified US students often lose their spots at elite American colleges because the schools offer inflated pricing to Chinese applicants…and the Chinese pay it.”

          So, in other words, they’re charging more…because somone’s willing to pay more.

          Hmmm…sounds like good old fashioned capitalism in action to me.

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            The core question revolves around the primary purpose of colleges and universities in USA. Is educating our own citizens or foreigners the primary purpose of American higher education? I am fairly certain few Americans would claim the latter.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Well, I suppose these schools could argue that overcharging foreigners helps underwrite educations for Americans.

            (Or so the story goes – we all know they do it because they can. Like I said…capitalism in action.)

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Let’s not forget the history here.

            Public funding has been cut for American universities over the last 15 years or so, in the name of low taxes and efficient government.

            So, my university was faced with a choice:
            1) Shrink, and do less educating.
            2) Reduce the scope up their mission, and do less research.
            3) Admit more profitable foreign students to make up for the budget shortfall.

            My local university chose Option #3. It’s the option which best matches their values because they believe in both education and research — and because they are at least teaching *someone*. Educators prefer to teach their way out of problems.

            So, yeah, this is what you guys voted for when you voted to shrink government.

            Also, higher education has become a cutthroat industry. Publish or parish. My wife has a PHD, but went into corporate America because, honestly, it’s less competitive and pays better (both per year and per hour). So that’s the history.

            If you guys want higher education to serve Americans, you’re going to have to find it. Otherwise, they will sell education to the most profitable students — which would be foreign students.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            …and let’s not forget that de-funding the colleges is politically advantageous from a certain fake-conservative standpoint.

            Take a look at the county-by-county voting maps for states like Nebraska, Kansas or Missouri – find the little blue island in the middle of the sea of red, and you’ll have found where the flagship state university is located. That’s no accident – universities have tons of employees, most of whom are instructors, and guess how most of them vote? Shrink the schools, and you shrink the opposition’s political base.

            I wish that weren’t the case, but it’s the same rationale behind the jihad on teachers’ unions – screwing them over means less money flowing into the DNC.

            Follow the money..as always.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “If you guys want higher education to serve Americans, you’re going to have to find it.”

            Starting after the GI Bill after WWII a bubble was slowly formed in education, with many universities, college trade schools etc being founded or significantly expanded to accommodate about twenty years worth of GI Bill students. However by the 1970s this influx of veterans was drying up, and economically what should have happened is the price of education should have fallen and a percentage of this now expanded academia go bankrupt as the market adjusted. However two events happened in the 1970s to prevent this:

            1. SLMA was founded in 1973, which eventually led to the financialization of education.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sallie_Mae

            2. Griggs v. Duke Power Co., 401 U.S. 424 was ruled on in 1971 by the Supreme Court.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griggs_v._Duke_Power_Co.

            Allow me to explain.

            Anything which is allowed to be financialized dramatically escalates in price. If tomorrow financing were no longer available for car purchases, within a short time the price of vehicles would fall as only cash buyers could afford to make acquisitions. No different than student loans, simple supply and demand.

            SLMA was a partial government entity founded to offer and service government education loans. Later it became private and grew into what would become the Sallie Mae company. Now with financing, a whole new pool of buyers was opened up for the excess supply of universities and kept them liquid.

            Griggs v. Duke Power Co was a case of job discrimination where the defendant was using aptitude tests in hiring practices which adversely impacted job applications. Essentially, what was happening was the defendant used these tests (and a high school diploma requirement) to keep blacks from applying to better paying jobs in the company. The court ruled:

            “Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employment tests (when used as a decisive factor in employment decisions) that are not a “reasonable measure of job performance,” regardless of the absence of actual intent to discriminate. Since the aptitude tests involved, and the high school diploma requirement, were broad-based and not directly related to the jobs performed, Duke Power’s employee transfer procedure was found by the Court to be in violation of the Act.”

            So guess what happened next? Employers in the 1970s started preferring and sometimes requiring a college education in hiring practices (in some cases in order to legally continue discrimination since 1970s minorities were less likely to possess such credentials).

            Boom, a perfect storm. Suddenly there is a new supply of buyers for a bloated undergraduate system -which should have shrunk- and now new demand from industry which previously had not considered an educational requirement beyond high school.

            Fast forward forty years, now somehow it is legal to essentially discriminate against job applicants who do NOT have a degree product AND the federal government has stepped in to provide corporate welfare, secured by students, to a “Big Academia” which has resulted in a metaphoric train wreck in social society.

            We need fewer institutions, fewer collegiate students (but perhaps an expansion of trade schools). Traditional college has already been watered down vs the 1960s to accommodate the less intelligent of society.

            “Also, higher education has become a cutthroat industry. Publish or parish.”

            Interesting, thank you for this tidbit.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Let’s be honest here, you are never going to buy this Buick no matter what, it is really only the Chinese who buy them now, so why wouldn’t they build it there.

      You want American? Buy a Camry.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “seems few have good things to say about the division from Lansing.”

    They did make an engine a lot of us liked.
    Also I’m pretty sure “division from Lansing” is Oldsmobile, not Buick.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I fail to see the value proposition even within the typical Buick/GMC/Cadillac showroom. The Envision competes directly with the XT4 and the Terrain. Why choose Buick? Even the Regal TourX is a better proposition. For $10k less you can get any mainstream brand’s compact crossover fully loaded, any of which would be an easier sell when you show your friends your new ride.

    Every review of a GM vehicle needs to have an asterisk next to the MSRP. GM bakes in the automatic 10-20% discounts they are constantly running.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The Terrain is cheaper, the XT4 is more expensive. Buick slots in the middle. “A car for every purse and purpose”, it’s called. That’s classic GM: one platform, three models at three price points.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        The Terrain is cheaper, but not worse. The Acadia is the same price, but bigger. And the XT4 at least has the luxury brand name.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @dwford:
          They’re hoping Buick’s “brand cachet” will make you pay more for the same thing.

          It can be profitable — look at BMW — but only if you can pull it off.

          Tesla has kind of an opposite approach. They sell expensive cars with technology you can’t get elsewhere. I actually care about that

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Deford, having traded our 2016 Envision Prem ll on a stripper Regal TourX the wagon does not have the refinement.of the Envision in NVH and quality interior materials. I miss the sportier Hyperstrut but like the car-like lower center of gravity.

      Our discounted Envision was $35K while a Tour Preferred(Thr cloth was more co.fortable than the leather) was $27K with Sights and Sounds pkg.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      To be fair, the TourX is a better proposition than pretty much everything to a TTAC reader. A truly sexy-looking station wagon, utterly unknown to most of the buying public, with AWD and a nice turbo engine, legitimate German provenance, and resale value guaranteed to be abysmal. The perfect thing to buy used and sniff about how people are idiots to buy SUVs.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I will give current Buicks credit for still using the good version of the 2.0T instead of the weak-a$$ed one going into recent Cadillacs.
    Although who knows how long that will last.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    I was just parked next to a maroon one in a Kroger parking lot not too long ago – brand new with the paper license plates – this same model. First thought was that it was yet another inoffensive blob on the landscape with designs cribbed from everyone else (really – look at the rear 3/4 shot at the rear windows and tell me you don’t see a bit of X3 there.) And GM’s interior suppliers have to be under some kind of forced purchase to buy as much hard, grey plastic as possible because they love draping their interiors in it.
    But at least it doesn’t have an iPad taped to the dash – this one is at least integrated, so there’s a plus!
    One day this crossover insanity will die down and the pages here at TTAC will hopefully be once again filled with interesting coupes, sedans, convertibles, and sports cars that are at least different from one another. That day can’t come quickly enough.

  • avatar
    Asdf

    GM and China are a perfect fit. GM is a quality-averse automaker, and China is a quality-averse manufacturer of cheap crap. GM should have pulled out of the US and not just Europe, and concentrated on its future home country of China, that way the civilized world wouldn’t have had to put up with crap like the Chinese-built Envision.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Even without that vast swath of ugly fake-wood, that dash is a super-busy disaster.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    短的;近的;矮的;短期的;短暂的;简短的;少量的;简短地;突然扼要
    段落;短评;将…分段;分段落;写短评段落

    Bruick Envrision! Feel Exciterement, by Guangzhou Motor (GM), Dong Yue LLC.

    Interior parts and a textures and all components pride of Dong Yue LLC, Industrial Zone D17, Factory No. 3.

    SAIC Guangzhou deeply values lowest cost bidder parts supplier status with GM North America!

    We a make a ra all parts and put together for General a Motors a and shipra to Bruick dearers in a United Strates!

    Tanks for a hepring Peoples Repubric of China become dominant rivarl to a USA, GM!

  • avatar
    iNeon

    The leading edge of the front door panel— where 13* different materials and cutlines meet— will be the test of the state-of-the-art in 2019, 10 years from now.

    Gee that’s a busy 6”.

    *I didn’t really count.

  • avatar
    honda1

    That is one expensive chicom pos.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    You can always buy a Chevy Trailblazer for $50K.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Gee, another over-priced crossover from GM. This and the Chevy from yesterday are decent crossovers, but $50K+ for vehicles that should be about $35K is ridiculous

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Sree the USA in 100% assembled in China of 100% Chinese parts Bruick Envrision or in 100% hecho en Mexico of 70% non-American made parts Chevrolet Blazer!

    Thanks for massive taxpayer bailout, American Taxpayers (and CONgress)!

    Sincerely,

    Mary Barra

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      nitpick: assembled by a 50%-GM owned subsidiary. GM China isn’t even 100% owned by GM.

      A fact glossed over by the free-trade propaganda.

      I’m pro-free trade between countries with level playing/regulatory/environmental fields—give me free trade all day long w/Canada, the Germans, UK, Japan, etc.

      China? Mexico? no, thanks.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    So many haters here. But, objectively speaking, that entire dashboard is a an unmitigated POS. The emergency blinker button is particularly heinous.

  • avatar
    ltcmgm78

    GM missed a chance to sell the Envision at a lower MSRP by taking advantage of cheaper Chinese labor, didn’t they? I see these on the street and they just don’t stand out very well. Doesn’t look like it’s worth $50K to me. Maybe $35K? Lower price might make it a more compelling buy. Looks like it has inherited the side-swoop that was on the side of the previous generation Regal.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      This.

      It would sell OK for 35k, but not 50k. The problem is they ruined their reputation for a long time and they won’t be able to get away with it without losing money. The other problem is, why would you buy this when other brands have the same value? Their competitors across the globe likely have better economy of scale in the R&D and marketing, so even if they cost the same to make (which likely isn’t, maybe cheaper for the same quality due to scale), they can sell for more.

      They are paying now for kicking the can down the hall for decades.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      Even at discounted prices, I don’t see how this wins. It seems to cost more than somewhat desirable vehicles, like an Acura RDX or a Mazda CX-5. And it looks like the offspring of a Kia Sedona and a Chrysler Pacifica.

      I don’t really find it interesting at any price, but it has 4 wheels and moves from place to place, so I guess someone will buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Your Envision Prem ll is awaiting for middle $30’s on autotrader. Enjoy and hope you like yours as much as we liked ours.

  • avatar

    I always thought that when we saw a Chinese build it would be a chinese brand, like Great Wall, or such. It would also excuse any poor build quality with low price, following in the footsteps of other break in car companies. If all goes well, the copying would improve and eventually you’d find a Kia with a price tag over $50k, but arguably worth it. This is how Japan did it, and no one scoffs at Toyota, Honda, anymore….

    Instead GGM slaps Buick badges on it and prices it like the UAW built it in a first world location. Sheesh ! What, Mexico was too expensive to build in ? I guess shipping really is cheap nowadays.

    No, I wasn’t buying one anyway, but…..

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Given Chicom labor rates and cost of production of Chicom parts in Dong Yue Factory Block D17, this should be sold for no more than $15,000.00 US.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Anyone seen any reports on long(ish) term reliability on this car?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Since the 2016 Envision was Premium trim only with 2.0T there should be some bearing the 40K mile mark. Our 2016 had 26K on it and was solid, without needing repair or warranty work.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    They paved Lordstown, and put up a Dong Yue Envision job shop
    With a bustling parts fabrication network, it’s a swinging hot spot

    Don’t it always seem to go
    That you don’t know what got till it’s gone
    They paved Lordstown, and put up a Dong Yue Envision job shop

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    Serious question; does this exist to prop up the MSRP for a GMC counterpart?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t think it’s accidental that this car’s so generic and gets so little marketing support. My suspicion is that it exists for one reason only: to test out the feasibility of importing GM cars from China.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        FreedMike – Interesting thought and I tend to agree. A trial balloon, as it were.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Yep. Much like Volvo importing a somewhat obscure long wheelbase S60 variant to test US acceptance of a Chinese built Volvo. (FWIW, narrow-but-long is the ideal sedan format; I was kinda bummed I missed the few months they had a bargain lease on the thing.)

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Reminds me of the commerical Buick airs here where the woman says “That’s my Buikc” and the husband/boyfriend looks hopefully at the sleek Regal, and she says “No, that’s it” pointing to one of these lumpen turds.

  • avatar
    Dingbat

    When did TTAC’s best and brightest turn in to a cesspool of economic illiteracy and veiled xenophobia? Oh wait, it’s the internet and the always-online keyboard warriors respond to dog whistles.

    The typical derisive comments made about Chinese products were made about Koreans in the very recent past. They were made about Japanese goods a generation ago. Heck, go back to the second half of the 19th Century and Americans were busy cribbing their manufacturing prowess from the British.

    The US manufacturing industry didn’t just die because of them sinister foreigners. Your ruling corporate and financial elite chose to change the tax laws, legalizing stock buy backs, and elevating stock prices–All at the expense of capital investment. Little things like R&D and machinery upgrades were seen as irrelevant. Furthermore, the cost of American healthcare and education, etc. has made the US just about the MOST expensive, most inefficient place to have any business.

    Contrast the plight of Detroit to the German manufacturers. High wages, but their manufacturing is still competitive because the cost of doing business is lower, AND their tax laws do not reward corporate looting like our tax laws.

    You guys can mock foreigner accents and cast aspersions at their cultural atavism or whatever. The GM bosses however, are laughing at how you are dumb enough to have your legitimate grievances about a dying manufacturing economy directed towards a scapegoat.

    • 0 avatar
      Raevoxx

      I’m going to straddle the line, here, and kind of cut directly to the chase; to the heart of the matter.

      New GM never strayed far from Old GM, and is unquestionably turning BACK into Old GM.

      I am not entirely sure if, or why, there’s much more to add.

      • 0 avatar
        Dingbat

        Unfortunately most of the resident trolls here don’t see this point.

        They focus on nationality while completely ignoring the much larger role of corporate looting.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @Dingbat: But, but you are pointing your finger(s) at the 1% and inciting class consciousness. How dare you?

      The American ruling elite have always used the threat of ‘the other’, be it African slaves, Indigenous peoples, immigrants (first from Southern Europe then from elsewhere), to keep the ‘working class’ Caucasians from identifying just who was oppressing them, and over the past years, taking away their jobs.

      Deluded by the opium of ‘individualism’ and Horatio Alger, working class Americans do not even realize that they have fallen behind many other nations in regards to social mobility and that they are being ruled largely by 2nd or 3rd or even 4th generation multi-millionaire beneficiaries of the ‘lucky sperm club’.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I disagree with the idea that those in charge of the PRC are innocent scapegoats akin to those you listed in your second paragraph.

        However, even surrendering that point, if GM outsourcing heavy business to China is an example of American corporate greed run amok but doing things to slow down the flow of capital into the PRC is xenophobic or “economic illiteracy”, what do you and Mr.Dingbat advocate here?

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @Ajla: I don’t believe that you are referring to my posting. However I do not agree with entering into ‘free trade’ agreements with dictatorships, autocracies, nations that do not have ‘the rule of law’, or 3rd world nations. Nor do I agree with lowering corporate taxes to try to ‘compete’ with the taxes in those nations.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      “You guys can mock foreigner accents and cast aspersions at their cultural atavism or whatever. The GM bosses however, are laughing at how you are dumb enough to have your legitimate grievances about a dying manufacturing economy directed towards a scapegoat.”

      I think you are getting hung up on the attempted ethnic humor and missing the point of certain posts. The cynical globalist corporate agenda is the main point. The string-pulling elites on both sides of the ocean (and the other ocean) both deserve criticism.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      It’s a bit different when the country in question is a communist dictatorship, there’s room for concern. When the Japanese and Koreans rose up, they also didn’t do it with help from our own manufacturers. They built up their products on their own. China got there by offering cheap labor and virtually no environmental regulations in exchange for 50% joint ventures that allow them to steal our intellectual property. All in exchange for better profits in the next quarter.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        All correct, but on the other hand, a) we did it to ourselves, and b) if they hadn’t done this with us, they’d have done it with someone else (which, in fact, they do).

        And I don’t know how you call China a communist country – it gave that up probably 40 years ago.

  • avatar

    Stop the Invasion, Boycott Envision.

    I have prevented literally hundreds of sales directly.

    it’s easy to do, just mention China and people say no way!

    • 0 avatar
      Dingbat

      LOL. Go stand outside an Apple store.

      Better yet, check your phone or PC for its country of origin.

      Even if your car’s final assembly is not in China, it’s just about impossible to live without their parts.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Like Quickdraw McGraw, America shot itself in the foot by sponsoring China for WTO membership, way back then.

        China stole everything we brought to them and is using it all against the US.

        Who didn’t see that comin’?

        At least today we have a President that fights for America and Americans. The damage is done but payback is sweet.

        I say slap the same tariffs on Chinese made goods imported to the US as China slaps on US-made goods entering China.

        How sweet it is!

    • 0 avatar
      Dingbat

      LOL. Go stand outside an Apple store.

      Better yet, check your phone or PC for its country of origin.

      Even if your car’s final assembly is not in China, it’s just about impossible to live without their parts.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    CHINA HAS STATED CLEARLY, PUBLICLY AND UNAMBIGUOUSLY THAT IT HAS THE GOAL OF OVERTAKING THE UNITED STATES ECONOMICALLY, MILITARILY AND IN ALL OTHER ASPECTS.

    CHINA REPRESENTS AN EXISTENTIAL THREAT TO NOT JUST THE UNITED STATES, BUT WESTERN DEMOCRACIES AND INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS.

    IF CHINA SUCCEEDS IN ACCOMPLISHING ITS STATED GOALS, THE WORLD WILL BE A FAR, FAR DARKER, GRAVER, ORE BRUTAL PLACE.

    THE WORLD MUST UNITE TO DEFEAT THE CURRE T CHINESE REGIME, AND REFORM CHINA’S GOVERNMENT’S ATTITUDES TOWARDS HUMAN RIGHTS, PERIOD.

    • 0 avatar
      Dingbat

      Easy there Tiger. What’s with the all-Caps?

      Right now it’s the US of A bombing all sorts of oil-rich brown people, and not letting them in.

      A lot of brown people from Latin America are also not being let in. Oh wait, the US also bombed them, and propped up their comprador class in exchange for banana plantations a generation ago.

      Safe to say, you’re really not a student of history. American manufacturing went into decline with changes to the tax code–Detroit went to hell long before the rise of Chinese manufacturing.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Cool. Now do China’s history. The US might not let people in but the PRC sure seems to have an issue with letting people out.

        You are getting a good head start on President Xi’s social credit score though.

        • 0 avatar
          Dingbat

          Who said I was a fan of them?

          You could dig a bit deeper into the history of China, say maybe 200 years, then talk about who invaded whom. Ditto with maybe every other colonized place in the world.

          When people do not have a clue about domestic American political economy and history outside of Ayn Rand novellas, do you expect them to know about outside places?

          As lame as it sounds, the typical person in China has more knowledge of the US than the typical American has knowledge of China. This despite the ham-fisted censorship. You’d respond, but somehow I doubt your knowledge of foreign places is from a source outside of CNN/FOX/whatever White House spokesperson moron.

          Thus you get supposed college-educated Americans freaking out about weapons of mass destruction and then volunteering to become cannon fodder.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          With the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre now past, CCP trolls need some ideas to suppress online.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      We’re destined to lose battle against China. They have a concrete direction. One party system that seem to find a sweet spot between capitalism and whatever rest of it is called. While out politicians endlessly fighting for elections and country isn’t moving in this tag-a-war; Chinese execute their 100-year plan

  • avatar
    carguy

    A Chinese made Buick priced like a US made BMW X3?

    Good luck with that.

  • avatar
    Dingbat

    The resident dopes here don’t seem to realize that much of GM’s profits are from the Chinese market. Ideally that would translate into more cash for better technologies and improved factories.

    Or they would rather GM turn back the clock and avoid China completely. Last time I checked, GM’s products had turned to crap and Detroit had turned into a hellhole long before the rise of China.

    Instead we get xenophobes and economic illiterates riled up to the point of waging economic jihad. Do these geniuses realize that the corporate and financial overlords have gamed the system to prize stock values, capital gains, executive compensation over and above actual product quality and worker compensation?

    A generation ago, gullible economic nationalists accused Toyota/Nissan/Honda of cheating their way to market share. The scapegoats have changed, but the accusations have stayed the same. More importantly, the American corporate class is still getting rich while its expendable minions are distracted with xenophobia.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt51

      “The resident dopes here don’t seem to realize that much of GM’s profits”

      Much of GM’s profits? like 12%.

      GM owns less than 50% of its joint ventures in China,so its Chinese car sales are overstated. Divide GM China car sales by at least 2. The current trade war could easily kill GM. But GM is already doing a fine job of killing itself.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        you are correct, that troll is invincibly ignorant

        GM will be shown the door by China but it’s coming much faster than expected – GM sales there are in free-fall and like, Apple has seen, once the Chinese steal the tech and make their knock-offs much cheaper, the jig is up

        every day more companies are announcing they are leaving China

        btw, in the not too distant future India will overtake China in population as China faces a demographic crisis

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    While I’m not in the right age bracket for this car – I’m 31 – I kind of like the styling aside from the cellulite going on near the taillights and hatch. That said, it’s too expensive for me and I hesitate to gamble on an L-VIN.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I can’t believe the pricing on this thing.

    PRC wages and PRC suppliers but let’s price it like it was assembled in the US.

    F*** You GM.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      believe it or not, GM claims to be absorbing the 25% tariff

      at some point, the whole “saving dead brand Buick because China” will be seen as a huge debacle for GM, wasting those billions in US profits just to facilitate tech theft by the Chinese

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    As Buickman would simply state, “[S]top the Buick/GM Invasion!”

    Put 100% Tariffs on all vehicles assembled outside of United States borders (exempting Canada) and/or those having foreign parts content of more than 20% imported parts content by forcibly taxpayer bailed out ward of the state Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors, LLC (GM).

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Not surprisingly sales are down for the Envision which does suggest some are being turned off with the made in China thing and the bland styling. Most at my dealer are priced between 38-42K and I never have seen a 50k example.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    My 2019 Buick Envision Review:

    Here I have a Buick, vin number…. what? DO NOT BUY, it will ruin you in unpredictable way

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    People such as Dingbat, and the others who are snowflaking over my calling out a real, tangible existential threat to the western way of life (some genuine protections against total government tyranny) that is a far greater threat than the USSR or any other nation was/is to the US (and like-minded and governed western democracies), are part of the biggest problem we face in dealing with this threat.

    China is a much bigger threat to our very way of life in the U.S., U.K., Germany (post-WWII), Canada, France, Spain, Italy, Poland, Austria, the rest of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, etc than any nation ever, including Nazi Germany, and they laugh in bewilderment at our delicate sensitivities, as they know none.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Yeah, yeah, yeah. BS through and through, DW.

      I’m with dingbat. The US first and then the European corporations decided, hey, the Chinese work for nothing, let’s put our consumer goods factories there! Let’s dump our workers at home, and then sell them back ersatz product made overseas in China. We’ll make moolah until it comes out of our ears!

      And so it was done. America lost millions of jobs, courtesy of their very own companies, corporate greed and stock prices.

      Did the average US dunce pay any attention as their country was robbed out from beneath them by their own countrymen? No, apparently not bright enough to even read what happened. It’s that first class education you all got, which majored in navel-gazing, while ignoring everywhere and anything else.

      So much easier to blame the Chinese for what Americans did to themselves Aw, poor babies, you’ve been so hard done by. So why not add in a bit of hate for no apparent reason other than chest-beating pride and complete lack of knowledge,

      Dumb doesn’t begin to describe America or all the countries who allowed their own corporate greed to loot their own countries by establishing factories in what was then a low wage country. Blame that system, not the country that accepted the jobs offered.

      And now I read utter BS about Chicoms, while America is supposed to be the bulwark of enlightened free thought, which is the laugh of the century. You people believe your own lies with a gusto that is amazing.

      Apparently China is an enemy because, what? Large American companies raided America, dumped labor, and sent jobs to China? Uninformed rubbish. One guy is gutted about the Chinese. Be gutted about your own traitorous capitalists that sold your birthright down the river for $1 an hour and three bowls of rice a day.

      I know a lot of posters cannot admit that to themselves. Doesn’t square with the hand over heart chest-beating pride you’ve been fed since you were toddlers. And now you’re as brainwashed as any Chicom as you call them, in your blighted ignorance. It’s easier, apparently than to admit you made a huge mistake.

      GM is just one of your own companies that slit your own throats. There’s thousands of others just as or more guilty.

      There’s no one here from the growling hating right wind dumbo class who can prove my assertions otherwise.

      You caused it, now you get to live with it. I’m Canadian and into my seventies, a car nut for life. I’m no friend of the Chinese who treat Canada like dirt now they’re a big boy and we’re still a nobody. Rude doesn’t begin to describe how their Ambassador was back in 2015 and as Chinese trolls descended on our online political forums. Right now they’re not buying our agricultural products, so let ’em starve, I say. They’re trade bullies just like the US is with us. The fate handed the small in stature as it ever was.

      Our Canadian workers were dumped back in the late ’80s when we got our first trade deal with the US. Tariffs disappeared, Our small branch plants closed – I worked for one. 400,00 factory jobs went poof. We had none left to lose to China a decade later. You Americans reserved that right to shoot yourselves in the foot to yourselves.

      As Canadians, we get to tiptoe around trying to avoid clashes with the big boys just to earn, to be “allowed” if truth be told, our daily crust. This constant US whining about China just p*sses me off. If you’re a free country, own up to your own mistakes instead of telling yourself lies and believing horsesh*t. You’ll be stronger if you admit the truth instead of manufacturing fantasy, while posturing like a peacock to the world at large.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        I just want to stroll by and agree with you. Not all of us subscribe the American Exceptionalist jingoistic bull-pucky.

        As an aside, I will only say that I recognize the Chinese people are not their government, just as the American people (of which I am one) are not their government.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Blame that system, not the country that accepted the jobs offered.”

        I expect most of us here blame “the system” and not China directly. And, certainly no blame to the individual Chinese autoworkers. No one in China forced US companies to invest heavily over there. They did that on their own.

        That said, I’m against the idea that Americans should forever just accept the situation as some sort of cosmic penance. I’m not 70 years old or 40 years old or 35 years old. That will be a long time to just passively “live with it” and I’m not going to feel personal shame for failure to march on Washington when I was in high school.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @conundrum: You should probably be teaching or writing professionally. Thanks for that posting.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      No, DW, no one’s saying China isn’t an economic threat. They’re just pointing out that corporate greed is also a threat.

      Question is: how do we deal with these threats? Unless we go to war with China, the best we can do is trade deals. And given how strong China is becoming economically, those may or may not work in the long run. Like it or not, the race for global economic supremacy is going to look a lot like the AL East – we’re the Yankees and the Chinese are the Red Sox. Take your pick.

      Either way, we can’t control them. But we sure as hell can rein in our own corporations. We can start by removing their ability to buy our elected officials, which is putting our own house in disorder. And if our own house isn’t in order, how do we stand up to China?

  • avatar
    The_Guru

    It has nothing to do with Buick being looked at as an old persons car or being mad about Pontiac or Olds, and you know it. A quick look at the comments on any previous blog about an Envision would have told you as much.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t dislike this crossover but I would not buy one when you can get an equivalent Honda, Toyota, Mazda, Hyundai, or Kia for less and still made in America. I am not that crazy about supporting the Chinese anymore than I already do–I phones, computers, kitchenware, lawn equipment, clothing, small appliances, office supplies, and many other items. I do agree with Deadweight that the Chinese are not our friends and that we have a Faustian Bargain with the Devil.

  • avatar

    Discussing Buick is like discussing Donald Trump – sooner rather than later Buick Derangement Syndrome rears its ugly head.

  • avatar

    GM Can’t crack the Japanese market because their buyers are too savvy.

    This is America. Boycott Envasion.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’m so confused it’s hard to tell who the bad guy is anymore, I know, I’ll boycott everything that way I’ll be sure to punish the correct offender.

    You all come visit me in my mud hut sometime… least it’s American mud, I think

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    This does nothing for me – and at this price (I know, I know – incentives and rebates!) you’re knocking on (base) Tahoe territory.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Seems like they are dumping them in Canada – only time I see one is on a commercial vehicle.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    What a pile of boomer-grade garbage. Glad the tariffs are ruining them.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    Based on the comments, the Buick Envision seems to press some buttons. It presses mine. Manufacturers seem to get a free pass selling CUVS for $50k. (The Chevrolet Blazer in another current review is also $50,000), but when a loaded Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid stickers at $50k, people bitch and moan about the price. The Pacifica Hybrid at that price has more content, more luxury, a $7500 tax credit to cushion the blow, and costs half as much in gasoline and carbon emissions.

    The fact is that the average worker in the US and Canada can’t truly afford any $50,000 vehicle, or even $40,000 vehicle. That’s why many people who buy them are putting them on 80 month payments.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, they’re getting a free pass selling them because they do sell.

      But you’re right about lack of affordability. I suspect there will be two car markets before too long – one for folks with the means (or who appear to have the means) to buy $50,000 new vehicles, and another for those who can’t. The latter market will probably be served by the off-lease $50,000 cars.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      IMHO, the Pacifica Hybrid is the nicest vehicle you can buy for that money, especially after the PHEV tax rebates. Top trim is hilariously luxurious, and any trim feels like a luxury car from behind the wheel: silent, serene, torquey. There’s room for anyone and anything that might ever want to come along, yet it gets the MPG of an econobox. I know that in true Chrysler fashion it has racked up a horrifying record of occasionally fatal unreliability, and the company can be counted on not to be counted on in case warranty issues do arise, but I don’t care: if I had the dough and the need for a vehicle like that, I’d pay my money and take my chances.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Sales of the Envision are down because of 2018 redesign of Equinox and Terrain offer lower prices.

  • avatar
    Polka King

    “The interior is, with one significant exception, inoffensively attractive and purposeful.”

    That picture of the dashboard/steering wheel ensemble should be the picture in the dictionary under “monstrosity”.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    What a steaming turd this thing is. The audacity charging $50k for this is hilarious. Seems like a lot of people don’t like it being made in China. For me, the only reason to buy a turd like this that’s made in China is because it’s significantly cheaper than a European, Japanese, or American vehicle of similar caliber. This thing misses the mark completely, in every way imaginable.

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