By on May 21, 2019

Image: Tesla

There must be more than a few half-grins among the cynical, perpetually grumpy denizens of Finance Twitter today. For the first time since late 2016, Tesla’s stock price opened below $200. Compared to the sky-high valuation the company’s enjoyed a year or two ago, Tesla’s sinking shares reflect the weight of reality.

Tesla needs cash. Years after it began building electric cars for the fairly well-off masses, the company’s actions in recent months stands in stark contrast to the rosy predictions of the past, and it seems people are taking notice.

When trading opened Tuesday, Tesla’s stock price sat at $197.75 — a steep climbdown from the $332.80 it ended 2018 with. The stock briefly dipped below the $200 market last Friday. Gone are the headlines touting Tesla’s wild market value that followed the stock’s precipitous rise in early 2017.

The company’s fall back to earth is the product of numerous actions and events that all add up to a picture of a company in trouble. A dismal deliveries report in the first quarter. A unexpectedly large loss on the heels of two consecutive profitable quarters. A bid to raise $2.7 billion through an offer of stock and convertible notes, with CEO Elon Musk telling employees the money raised will buy the company 10 months. Then there’s the rounds of layoffs, the move to an online buying model, and near-daily fluctuations in vehicle price.

Meanwhile, there’s a Model Y and a Shanghai Gigafactory to get off the ground. Oh, and an electric pickup truck. And a semi. And a roadster. Controversy continues to rage over the automaker’s Autopilot driver assist system, which an NTSB report says was turned on in the lead-up to a recent fatal collision.

As reported by the Los Angeles Times, Wedbush Securities analyst Dan Ives cut his price target for the stock on Sunday, dropping it from $275 to $230 and telling investors that Musk faced a “code red” over his company’s finances.

“There are dark clouds forming over Fremont,” he told the Times.

Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas dropped his worst-case scenario share price to $10 from $97 recently, citing concern over the U.S.-China trade war, The Street reports.

“Our revised case assumes Tesla misses our current Chinese volume forecast by roughly half, to account for the highly volatile trade situation in the region, particularly around areas of technology, which we believe run a high and increasing risk of government/regulatory attention,” Jonas said. “We believe as Tesla’s share price declines, the likelihood of the company potentially seeking alternatives from strategic/industrial/financial partners rises.”

The cost of default protection for Tesla bondholders is also on the rise, Jonas notes.

Amid the financial storm clouds and Musk’s promise, earlier this week, to watch every penny of expenditure comes calls for young investors to ignore the fact that Musk is cool and says awesome, forward-thinking things, and pay more attention to the company’s balance sheet.

[Image: Tesla]

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55 Comments on “Take the Tesla Plunge: Automaker’s Stock Plumbs Territory Not Seen in Years...”


  • avatar
    civicjohn

    You forgot to add the Solar City debt and looming employee headcount issues at GF2.

    They wouldn’t get nearly as much bad publicity if Musk would just keep his mouth shut occasionally. 1 million robotaxies in 2020. Right.

    • 0 avatar

      There are MORE clouds on the horizon:
      – Tesla looks glued to the upper-end of the EV market
      – Conventional styling
      – Way too dependent on EV tax credits
      – Other car makers are catching up fast
      – THE future is in the widespread use of EVs, affordable ones without EV subsidies.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    How long until asdf posts his cookie-cutter rant about the “defective” Tesla cars that can’t go for 500 miles on a five-minute charge?

    But, yeah, it ain’t looking good over there in Fremont. And the tragic thing is, so many of these problems could have been avoided if Elon would actually admit that there are people that know more about [topic] than he does, and he should probably hire them and let them do their jobs.

    I’m surprised that at the least, the board isn’t 1,000% insisting bringing in their own CFO, to at least keep his capital spending plans on planet earth. It’s hilarious that he thinks having to personally sign off on somebody’s trip to Staples is going to make one lick of difference compared with his massive product development and factory construction plans. (Not to mention the dumb-ass SolarCities bailout.)

    • 0 avatar
      Asdf

      “the “defective” Tesla cars that can’t go for 500 miles on a five-minute charge?”

      ICE-powered cars do this, and have been able to for decades. These are basic and modest expectations, and there are absolutely no good reasons whatsoever why consumers should expect or put up with BEVs that perform worse than their fuel-powered counterparts in this regard. The fact that current technology allegedly doesn’t make it possible does not constitute a good excuse, because Tesla has been around for more than 15 years now (!) and should have had something to show for all the taxpayer money it’s burned through by now.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “…Tesla has been around for more than 15 years now (!)…”

        And GM has been around for 111 years, and they can’t charge a LiIon battery in 5 minutes either, so would you please just STFU about technology that you know nothing about?

        • 0 avatar
          Asdf

          GM has been around for 111 years, and unlike Tesla it IS able to build a car with a 500-mile range, which can refueled in 5 minutes. This has been the case for decades, because GM, whatever its other flaws, is smart enough to use a fuel tank instead of Li-Ion batteries, which Tesla and others have demonstrated are clearly NOT fit for purpose.

          So it’s YOU who need to STFU, get your hands off the keyboard and put them to use elsewhere, such as the spot where your nickname suggests they spend most of their time already.

          • 0 avatar
            conundrum

            Send your screed about charge-up times to the electric utility industry.

            If they don’t dismiss you as a lunatic, maybe they’ll assign a tame engineer to write you an essay on the voltage and currents required to charge these batteries in five minutes, and then show you what equipment would be required, including a suitable charging cord that anyone this side of a male gorilla could not handle.

            All you do over and over is prove you have no idea what’s involved. It’s got bugger all to do with the EV industry, and a lot to do with reality.

            In the meantime your carping, caterwauling, moaning and whining needs a rest. You constantly remind people that the ill-informed are alive and walking about the planet in a daze. You’re requesting magic, not making a point, so pipe down, spend an hour or two and learn some basics.

          • 0 avatar
            Asdf

            I would welcome an engineer’s explanation of what would be required for a five-minute charge, I’m sure it would read like an indictment of BEV technology, and prove that Elon Musk has bet on the wrong horse technology-wise and that BEVs are not viable.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Interestingly, something has changed and Tesla’s stock is on the climb today, albeit a slow one. It almost looks to me like a number of people have decided it’s at a good level to buy in on some moderately potent trading. I know I’m tempted because I think the Tesla cars are the best BEVs on the current market, despite some big names dabbling there.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Vulpine, CNBC (and others) did a segment on Tesla cars/stock/outlook today. Very interesting.

      It seems to be that the only way Tesla can survive is to embrace the China (and Asia) market.

      The problem appears to be too many promises made, none kept, and a ballooning debt, much of it that comes due soon, with no prospects for a financial infusion to offset it.

      Ah, maybe the US and Israel taxpayers will bail out Tesla. China sure won’t, unless China gets 51% ownership in return.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        With certain companies, these so-called ‘analysts’ tend to be way out in left field; they overreact to some things and don’t react at all to others. Don’t forget that Tesla has already embraced China to the point that “Gigafactory 3” is already built and it appears a strong possibility at least one assembly line will be installed and testing, if not actually producing, by the end of this year.

        As for what the US will do: As a political entity, probably not much. But the people are less predictable. Some will do their damndest to make Tesla fail (like they have for the last 8 years) while others will do what they can to prevent it. Considering what the cars themselves offer, the other OEMs still have a ways to go to catch up. From what I’ve been reading, the Jag doesn’t come close to the range or performance of the Tesla Model X unless they choose the bare-bones version to compete against and none of the others trying to compete are into full production yet–they all seem like pre-production models that still need tweaking and modifications to get better economy and performance. The Americans buying EVs aren’t exactly flocking to these other brands yet, though some few are at least trying the Jag.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I have thought for a long time that a lot of what ails Tesla could be cured by taking on a strategic partner. Production capacity, sales outlets, manufacturing streamlining, suppliers, cash flow.

    Tesla is a great idea with great brand appeal. The dream of starting the “anti-car” company from scratch and casting aside the old world manufacturers seems like its coming to an end though.

    You think things are bad at Tesla now? Wait 2 years when 20 new high end EV competitors are on the market with better build quality, similar or better range and the backing of a large dealership network and deep pockets of established manufacturers. The one thing Tesla had working hugely in its favor….novelty….is quickly disappearing.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agreed… this market is prime for Audi to own. Imagine the current A4 thru A8 range but with Telsa’s drive train dropped in. You would think from a manufacturing standpoint this would be super easy – with no more engine blocks, cooling systems and transmissions to be built and fit the whole bottom half of the car’s construction would be faster and cheaper to assemble.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        I’m not sure ICE assembly costs as much as you think. Engine and transmission assembly is highly automated, using manufacturing techniques that have been refined to a science over the last century. And final assembly is pretty easy; generally the drivetrain and front-suspension for a Unibody is assembled atop the subframe, and then the whole subframe (with engine, transmission, axles, front suspension, and brakes, all attached) is raised upwards into the car as a unit.

        It’s true the electric cars are mechanically simpler in every way vs. ICE, but the cost of the batteries more than cancels out that cost advantage.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @JMII: You seem to have little understanding of engineering tradeoffs or car construction. ICE cars retrofitted with EV components are never optimized for cost, performance, or manufacturability.

        As for Audi (or anyone else), they won’t be using Tesla’s drivetrain. So they have to engineer their own, to the tune of billions of dollars, along with a dedicated platform so they can squeeze a little profit out of it. Then they have to build it efficiently enough to make money on the mythical sales volume they claim they’ll have.

        Moreover, you have to convince the supply chain partners that it’s even worth tooling up for that stated volume. Then, you have to give the American public some confidence that the car can be charged anywhere, anytime, for long trips. So far, only Tesla can claim that.

        Turns out, it’s really hard to do. If it was easy, the mainstream mfrs would have eaten Tesla’s lunch long ago.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Tesla has no lunch to eat.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            “Tesla has no lunch to eat.”

            @ToddAtlasF1: They do, if someone cares about 200k EV sales per year in one of the only growing market segments.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            They could sell a million EVs a year and lose five times as much money. Real businesses want no part of that when they aren’t appeasing totalitarians who commute in private jets while dismantling the middle class and economic freedom on a global scale.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      One of those ‘high end EV competitors’ (Audi e-tron) isn’t even as good as a 2012 Model S:

      https://insideevs.com/reviews/350645/2012-tesla-model-s-vs-audi-etron/

      The Jaguar i-Pace showed promise, but it’s terribly inefficient with an inaccurate gas gauge to boot.

      The EV pretenders have produced a lot of concepts, but few have actually secured a serious battery supply. Fewer yet have talked about vehicle pricing and profitability, which means they’re hedging their bets with minimal capital investments and will be offsetting losses with ICE cars.

      Besides, how many people are going to sign up for a $60-80k Microbus or a $40k compact VW hatch?

      • 0 avatar
        civicjohn

        Then buy one and report back about how great it is. Yes, the 500-mile 5-minute charge stuff is stupid and it does appear that those who buy, love the vehicle. I think Audi and the others will find their way eventually. Tesla doesn’t have any freaking cash to do 10% of what Elon promises, he’s got a factory in China to finish, he’s got to bring the Model Y (how come we never get reports on deposits made?), he’s got a Semi to build, a Roadster, a Pickup, he’s got a new insurance program, flamethrower back orders (that’s a joke)…

        A Federal Judge in April gave class-action status to the shareholder lawsuit regarding Solar City. There is significant debt remaining from that deal, and they don’t need another lawsuit. I know the haters have predicted bankruptcy for years, but one day the chickens will come home to roost.

        Regarding the “EV pretenders”, who deemed that the world must be all EV next year? Hybrids are a great way to go for those of us who don’t think the world will go away in 12 years. Perhaps that’s where we differ, and I don’t take my marching orders from AOC. I wouldn’t worry, someone will swoop in and purchase the assets of Tesla. Maybe then Elon will have to ground his G-650. His 6 mansions are already on the market.

        Oh and I forgot to mention that there’s still over 200 S X and 3 still sitting in the mall parking lot 2 miles away from the dealer.

        • 0 avatar
          civicjohn

          … and I forgot to add there are still over 200 S, X, and 3 sitting in the mall parking lot 2 miles away from the dealership.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          @civicjohn: I vote “R”, and have an EV, hybrid, and ICE in my driveway. Global warming is a hoax designed to regulate people’s lives and wallets.

          AOC is a nut, but I do believe she’s being groomed to be the DNC presidential candidate in 2024.

          As for Tesla: They need to get rid of Mr Musk and then shelve all development projects except the semi, because it has serious corporate pre-orders already. If survival is on the agenda, then that’s all that should be on the agenda.

          • 0 avatar
            Asdf

            Tesla needs to fix the INHERENT DEFECTS in ALL its vehicles so that fully charging the battery does not take longer than filling a gas tank, and the range is on par with that of a diesel car, and then promptly issue a free recall for all Teslas on the road to ensure that they are retrofitted with non-defective parts to remove the defects.

          • 0 avatar
            civicjohn

            @SCE, I’m just cool if you vote. I don’t care which way, but the polarization of the US is distressing yet undeniable. My son, who is diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, is probably more conservative than I am, but I’m just proud of the values he has linked himself to and once he’s out of school, he’ll make some architectural firm proud.

            I don’t think Tesla’s drivetrain has magic dust in it, you dismantle it and learn what is needed. Yup, suppliers will be in demand for a while, I’m sure battery cells will be as well, but it does appear that a battery pack is made up of a bunch of battery cells – almost with the form factor of an AA cell. Any self-respecting manufacturer that can’t build an assembly line for packs probably should fail. Panasonic and Tesla seem to disagree about the output of GF1 – who knows who is telling the truth – but this isn’t the rocket science Tesla would like everyone to believe IMHO.

            Re: AOC, if that’s who they want to toss up, well, God bless them. I concur with your opinion that the Semi is something that they should focus on. Real money, real customers.

        • 0 avatar
          Asdf

          “Yes, the 500-mile 5-minute charge stuff is stupid”

          These are quite basic and modest expectations. YOU are the one looking stupid for dismissing my valid point.

          • 0 avatar
            civicjohn

            Well I guess what I’m trying to say is that your expectations of BEV charging is unreasonable at this moment, but many customers are able to install charging in their garage and it works for them.

            If that makes me look stupid, so be it. I would wager that more people agree with my perspective, and if they are able to do it, somebody will sell them BEVs.

          • 0 avatar
            Asdf

            It doesn’t matter that “many customers are able to install charging in their garage”, because home chargers don’t do anything to reduce BEV charging times. It is therefore irrelevant in this context.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Asdf: “It doesn’t matter that “many customers are able to install charging in their garage”, because home chargers don’t do anything to reduce BEV charging times. It is therefore irrelevant in this context.”

            — Actually, those home chargers are highly relevant because if you start out every morning with the equivalent of a ‘full tank’, then you never need to stop somewhere to recharge UNLESS you’re on a road trip–meaning you only spend a few seconds in the morning and evening to unplug or plug in your car and it simply doesn’t matter how long it takes to charge.

          • 0 avatar
            Asdf

            No, those chargers are not relevant at all, you moron, because they usually take SEVERAL HOURS to charge the battery and cause MANDATORY DOWNTIME during this time, all the while not fixing the INHERENT DEFECT of long charging times. Obviously it’s COMPLETELY UNACCEPTABLE to FORCE this mandatory downtime on BEV owners and thus make them have to compensate for the defects of their vehicles, regardless of what they DO or whether they need their car during this downtime.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Asdf: “No, those chargers are not relevant at all, you moron, because they usually take SEVERAL HOURS to charge the battery and cause MANDATORY DOWNTIME during this time,”

            — So what you’re telling me is that you refuel your car multiple times per day, EVERY day, just to make sure your car is topped of in case of some near-inconceivable emergency that means you have to travel 500 miles in five hours. Right?

            Kick yourself in the head and reboot your thinking processes. None of what you just said makes sense. Sure, under a home charger it does take a few hours; depending on which home charger you choose it could be as few as four hours or, if you’re a miser, maybe twelve hours. BUT… That is NOT, “Mandatory Downtime.” If you need to go back out for almost any reason, thirty seconds to unplug and rack the connector and you’re ready to go. Your run is not likely to demand an absolutely “full tank” just to run to the store and back or even rush your pregnant wife to the hospital the next town over. The average driver only does about 40-50 miles per day on their commute and they’ll still have charge left from their previous charging.

            You’re acting like the battery will be fully drained every night and that it has to be charged to full just to use it again. Do you REALLY drive your ICEV like that?

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        I hear what you are saying about the half measures taken by other automakers. But the tide keeps rising, more are on the way. Even in small numbers from a half dozen automakers, this seriously dents Tesla’s market. Some will be quite good, probably all of them will have better warranty and repair support, probably all of them wont have pieces falling off shortly after manufacture. It is simply death by a thousand cuts. Tesla’s potential customer base will slowly drain away to other automakers as their revenue falls and the red ink builds.

        Tesla has had staying power for far longer than I would have bet, and I hate to bet against Elon Musk, but it sure seems like the window of opportunity to hit critical mass and become profitable is nearly all but faded from view.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          ” probably all of them will have better warranty and repair support”

          The warranties probably won’t be better, but you’re right about the repair support.

          “probably all of them wont have pieces falling off shortly after manufacture.”

          Their competitors have a long history of “issues”. Porsche might be better, but I wouldn’t trust the others.

          The competitors are lagging behind in areas like motor efficiency. When the Maxwell technology gets implemented, they’ll be lagging on battery technology.

          Tesla won’t go away anytime soon. Elon just has to sell some of his SpaceX holdings and they’ll be good to go if needed.

          • 0 avatar

            While Tesla got where they are with the high end, that crowd tends to be a bit fickle over the last few decades (look at BMW MB and Audi sales over the years). If the next qtr shows possible saturation of Tesla buyers like the last did then their in for trouble. GM and H-K seem like they really are putting a decent effort into the lower end of the market. I think Tesla will live on but the possibility of world domination seems highly unlikely.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @mopar4: “I think Tesla will live on but the possibility of world domination seems highly unlikely.”

            — You don’t have to sell the most cars to dominate the automotive market; Tesla has already dominated it by effectively forcing most of the century-old OEMs to start producing BEVs today. As long as they continue to drive the direction of the industry, they will dominate, even if they only sell 1% of the overall market.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    How much is a Value America stock certificate worth today? That’s my target price for the next time TSLA will deserve a buy or hold rating.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    We all know that Tesla exists to change minds about climate change. I always get a laugh out of how much Elon flew his G-650 in 2018:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/elon-musks-highflying-2018-what-150000-miles-in-a-private-jet-reveal-about-his-excruciating-year/2019/01/29/83b5604e-20ee-11e9-8b59-0a28f2191131_story.html

    • 0 avatar
      Asdf

      “Climate change” is the hoax that Tesla relies on in order to get funding for its unsustainable business model.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I’d like Tesla more if that agenda wasn’t their centerpiece.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Without that agenda, there would be no EV subsidies. Without EV subsidies and the regulatory noose on ICE that comes with them, EVs would still be on the Victorian era scrap-pile of history where they belong. Tesla would be long gone without subsidies and money extorted from ICE buyers for Climate Change fleet requirement compliance. And what a better world this would be.

  • avatar
    Asdf

    Elon Musk is incompetent. Here’s a guy who’s run an automaker for a whopping 15 years, and he still hasn’t managed to deliver on the very basics, such as making a car that may be fully charged in a maximum of five minutes, with a range comparable to that of a diesel-powered car, while being competitive on price. These basic issues should have been sorted years ago, at the latest when the first Model S was launched. Perhaps then people would have bought his cars, and Tesla wouldn’t have been in the predicament it currently finds itself in.

    The reality is that Tesla won’t survive 2020, and will be lucky to survive 2019. When the bankruptcy is a reality it will be well deserved.

    • 0 avatar
      ttiguy

      Who are you and WTF do you do for a living that allows you to deem Elon as “incompetent”?

      I’m not a Elon Musk or a Tesla fan by any means, but the the fact that you think that building a car company from the bottom up using under-development technologies should be a done deal in “15 years” leads me to think you have no idea what it really takes to pull it off.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Problem is, Tesla doesn’t make the manual transmission…

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    It appears Tesla has a lot of design problems combined with poor manufacturing quality. Combine that with an overwhelmed service network and poor availability of parts and even a number of the true believers are getting unhappy. Some of these $60 grand Model 3 cars are looking like a 72 Vega after one winter because the Fremont paint line was pushing them out the door far beyond capacity. At the very least, Musk needs to dump that carbon spewing Gulfstream (450 gallons / hour) and build a battery powered plane for himself.

  • avatar
    6250Claimer

    It’s almost like BTSR is back under a new username. Food fight!

  • avatar
    Greg Locock

    One aspect that doesn’t get mentioned much in the fanboi/clickbait press is Tesla’s deteriorating relationship with Panasonic.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Might that, “deteriorating relationship with Panasonic” have something to do with Tesla’s effort to purchase Maxwell Batteries for their solid state design?

      • 0 avatar
        civicjohn

        I’ll await to see the benefits of the Maxwell purchase. They have been around for years, so any company could have made a run for them but only Tesla does.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Reportedly, Tesla jumped onto it because of the Supercapacitor technology more than the batteries themselves. Rechargeable batteries are really little more than wet-cell capacitors anyway, with serious charge/discharge rate limitations. A solid dielectric would eliminate much of the Li-Ion paste issues with ‘whiskers’ causing internal micro-short-circuits which limits their operational life.

          • 0 avatar
            civicjohn

            @Vulpine, I hear you about the technology, but why wouldn’t a battery company have bought them?

            Also, even though Tesla paid a 55% share premium to purchase them, I wonder if there will be more shareholder lawsuits since Tesla was at $312 then and has now dropped 33%?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @civicjohn: The deal hasn’t closed yet and there’s no guarantee now that it will. I can hope, because the technology would be a huge boost to their capabilities and probably reduce battery costs.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    If Tesla’s stock is above zero it’s still too high.

    Electric vehicles are not viable alternatives to ICE vehicles. ICE vehicles can be bought at a fraction of the cost as a Tesla EV and it doesn’t take hours upon hours to fill them up. They’re more reliable, they’re not built in a tent, and in come cases, actually cheaper to operate than a Tesla EV.

    Musk is a fraud.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @EBFlex: A prejudicial comment if I’ve ever read one. Tesla is not the ONLY BEV out there and they are certainly viable alternatives to ICEVs in almost every aspect of personal driving. The rest of your statement (hours upon hours, reliable, tent, etc.) are the same talking points nearly every anti-Teslite reiterates without even trying to understand what’s going on.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        I’ve put 82k miles on an EV in 4.5 years. If EVs aren’t viable how did I do that? Recharging doesn’t take hours and hours. Try minutes. Even then, it’s unattended so you’re not wasting your time standing next to a pump. Mine mostly charges overnight at home and at the office. Most of the time, I just go back and forth between home and the office without having to stop somewhere to fuel. I can also avoid dangerous gas stations. Gas stations are good places to avoid. Fueling at home is much safer:

        Car Jackings:
        https://www.google.com/search?q=gas+station+carjacking&oq=gas+station+carjacking&aqs=chrome..69i57.7904j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

        and explosions:

        https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/search-victims-after-gas-station-explosion-virginia-turns-three-sets-n1004651

        http://longisland.news12.com/story/34771959/crews-battle-fire-after-gas-station-explosion-in-brentwood

        Abductions:

        https://www.google.com/search?ei=nKDlXP74KKuJ5wKt0I_oCg&q=gas+station+rape&oq=gas+station+rape&gs_l=psy-ab.3…44497.45262..46180…0.0..0.122.417.2j2……0….1..gws-wiz…….0i71j0j0i20i263j0i22i30j0i22i10i30.jRE7ejHJGEw

        Food poisoning:

        https://www.mashed.com/72938/gas-station-foods-never-eat/

        Hepatitis:

        https://5newsonline.com/2019/04/05/hepatitis-a-confirmed-at-east-arkansas-gas-station/

        Alligators:
        https://www.foxnews.com/science/florida-police-officers-round-up-alligator-from-gas-station

        Snakes:

        https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2017/06/06/Georgia-gas-station-customer-finds-3-to-4-foot-snake-hiding-at-pump/4101496755275/

        Other stuff:

        https://www.google.com/search?q=car+hits+gas+station&oq=car+hits+gas+station&aqs=chrome..69i57.11215j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8


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