By on May 2, 2019

No shortage of once-innocuous locales and situations qualify as “unsafe” these days. If that bad chicken restaurant comes too close to a college campus (or Toronto), expect to see protesters demanding its removal, simply so people (ie – the protesters) can feel safe.

We’ve never been less safe in society, it seems, despite existential threats like polio, lead paint, and all-out nuclear war fading from view decades ago. Still, there are scenarios in which even those who scoff at these “unsafe spacers” grow sweaty palms.

Some cars, you see, do not instill confidence and courage.

It could be the diminutive size of the vehicle (ever been straddled by two semi trailers while travelling in a Miata?), its advanced state of disrepair or decay (“Is this seat about to fall through the floor?), or a combination of factors. Perhaps it’s just a vehicle that isn’t very big and isn’t very safe.

From time to time, we find ourselves riding in a vehicle that fits one of these descriptions. Here’s a recent conveyance I’ll avoid like the plague:

Nope, it wasn’t even the four-door model, either. The egg-shaped third-generation Hyundai Accent had one main selling point: its low, low price. Everything else — passenger room, power, appearance, and especially crash worthiness — sucked hard. I rented one once and walked away cursing the thing. Much more recently, a friend’s parent’s car took up residence in her driveway.

You author’s scalp almost hits the headliner near the trailing edge of the windshield. Seat pushed back to its maximum extent, legroom is still lacking, leading the mind to ponder what injuries might crop up in even a moderate front-impact crash. How tall would I be after emerging from the wreck?

To be frank, it feels like a death trap, and IIHS data partly justifies my fears (while Hyundai greatly increased quality and safety for the fourth-generation Accent, it doesn’t help anyone travelling in this fragile egg).

So, B&B, what vehicle in your life, or at least roaming around the periphery, leaves you feeling unsafe?

[Image: Hyundai]

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75 Comments on “QOTD: Feeling Unsafe?...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Any motorcycle, this thing is like an armored truck compared to a motorcycle and I’ve owned several

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Agreed, I never feel safe on a bike on public roads. Too many bad drivers.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Yep. My brother-in-law’s nephew (23yo) lost his right leg below the knee (also a compound femur fracture) about two weeks ago, when some girl (college student) pulled out from a driveway and then stopped, and he t-boned her with his bike. Fortunately, he’s upbeat – he needs to be.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I love speed, and motorcycles are cheap performance compared to the very fastest cars around. But I still don’t like the idea of being that exposed to other drivers stupidity. So I’ve stuck with cars.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Pretty much every vehicle I’ve ever owned was / is a death trap, one can’t go through life worrying about what *might* happen .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Oh my, how did my or previous generations ever survive? As an infant my brothers sitting on my mother’s lap on the front passenger seat of a Mini or Beetle. Later riding in the 3rd rear facing seat of a Country Squire with the back window down, sucking in the exhaust from the leaded gasoline. As teenagers driving around with 5 in the back seat of a Gremlin and 1 tucked into its ‘hatch’. The cars we drove/road in had not seatbelts, disc brakes, manual brakes and steering, no seatbelts, no head rests/restraints, and often 4 different, nearly bald biased ply tyres.

    Then there was the previous generations, laissez faire attitude towards drinking and driving. :-( In retrospect, were we ever stupid and/or gullible. If you don’t believe it, just watch or read some of the advertising that we fell for.

    Autos have never been safer. Thankfully so. Ironically, I would not let my offspring drive a vehicle without the requisite ‘passive’ safety features and actually use that as a ‘guide’ for acquiring a vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Oh my, how did my or previous generations ever survive?”

      I’m assuming you’re being tongue-in-cheek. but yeah, way too many people do take that attitude. Survivorship bias is a powerful thing; leads one to believe “well, I didn’t die, so nobody else did either.” Meanwhile, the on-road fatality rates over the years say the opposite.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      We used to go on class field trips and long family vacations playing games in the way back of our mid-80’s (new at the time) Pontiac wagon like there was nothing wrong with that. Flatten the vomit seat, flat floor, and have some fun back there. Now, if done today, my parents probably would have appeared in front of a judge!

      I’m aging myself here, but speaking of death traps, I just saw one a couple of days ago and it reminded me of a car a friend of mine had in high school (late 1980s-early 1990s). The Suzuki Samurai. Zero power, third world build quality, the worst brakes and safety systems dreamed up by the hand of man, but to a high school student in the late 1980s-early 90s, this was the epitome of cool. Top off, nice day, go cruising (do kids still do that???)

      The fact that we never rolled or crashed that death trap still amazes me to this day…

    • 0 avatar

      Well, many died in Vietnam (and Afghanistan). Not everyone survived.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I spend enough time on two wheels where I don’t feel particularly unsafe in any cage, but I don’t deign to make that decision on anyone else’s behalf.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    The Hyundai likely offers better crash protection than the 60’s muscle cars that are all the rage now.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      You are probably correct, but I feel safer in my steel cage. I have added some features purely with safety in mind. You can’t hide from crumple zones and break away steering columns though…

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    “Here’s a recent conveyance”
    2009 was a decade ago. I can’t remember the last time I saw one of these on the road.
    Anything short of a Class-8 truck is suspect.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      We have some sixty something friends that own a 3-door Accent like the one in the lede photo, in white. The husband primarily drives it, just around town.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Plenty of these around here as well as their Rio platform mates, nothing inherently bad about them from a reliability/durability perspective.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Agreed. My girlfriend had a ’10 Accent sedan and gave it to her kid. It’s got well over 100,000 miles, and it’s been solid reliability-wise.

        (Knock on wood.)

        And it’s not bad to drive, as long as you keep your expectations in check. It’s certainly better than the ’17 Versa I tried not too long ago.

      • 0 avatar
        Dingleberrypiez_Returns

        Seriously, I have no idea what Steph is going on about. My GF drives a Rio from this generation. It’s definitely a shitbox, but its surprisingly comfortable for its size, and I’m not a small person. Just move and recline the seat back. It was purchased new for its price, warranty, AND safety features… the car has side airbags and scores 4-5 stars on all front crash test metrics (https://www.autoblog.com/buy/2007-Kia-Rio/safety-ratings/). Granted this is before offset testing, but still.

        I get feeling unsafe or not enjoying a tiny shitbox economy car, but get your facts straight.

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        My daughter had an ’08 Rio. Traveling at 50 mph she t-boned a Mini that pulled out in front of her. Both cars were totaled but both drivers walked away uninjured. Pretty impressive considering.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      OK, I’m not disagreeing with you folks. I live in the rust belt so there are few econboxes which have survived a decade’s hard use. In fact, as I recall most Accents outlived their contemporaries (Chevy Aveo).

    • 0 avatar
      Liam Gray

      Here in New England, these things are still totally common. Aside from the crash tests and lack of creature comforts theyre great basic transportation.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    If it’s for one of my kids starting out driving, I won’t put them in anything that doesn’t have ABS and front, side, and side curtain airbags (although I still wish we’d bought that one-owner 20013 Camry LE with leather, moonroof, and power seat, for Daughter No. 2 – she rejected is as too old and not cool enough), but I’m not that hung up on anything other than ABS and a driver airbag (my ’95 F-150 had rear ABS and one airbag, and I was fine that).

    If you think the 2009 Accent is so awful, think about something like a first-gen Honda Civic hatchback. Lots of people drove them, and are still alive today.

    I’ve never driven anything (in proper repair) that made me feel unsafe, but maybe that’s because I grew up in the ’60s, when seatbelts (and just front ones in a lot of cases) were just becoming a thing.

    The one thing that did make me feel wary was a ’73 Fiat 124 sedan (automatic) that I test drove 40 years ago last month for a friend (asking price $1450, IIRC), that I figured out, after driving awhile, had only rear brakes, about the time I t-boned a guy driving a ’72 Impala. Fortunately I had the presence of mind to put on a lap belt, so I walked away with a bloody nose after hitting the steering wheel, and stiffness all over for a couple of days. My friend (unbelted) put his elbow in the glove box door, and had a large bruise.

    Needless to say, the guy selling the Fiat wasn’t happy, but he’s lucky I didn’t sue, plus my insurance company probably gave him more for the car than he would have gotten selling it – it wasn’t worth $1450.

    • 0 avatar

      ….Daughter No. 2 – she rejected is as too old and not cool enough.

      If I was paying the freight, it would be what I want not what she wants.

      Her money/her choice. My money/my choice. At worst I’d give her a short list of cars/trucks/SUVs that met my criteria and would have her pick 1. But, only off of that list.

      But, if it was still a no, she’d be on her own as far a using the family rig or calling for a pickup or wanting a ride somewhere.

      I wouldn’t spend thousands to have it thrown back in my face.
      Actions and decisions have consequences. That would be one of them.

      I gave my nephew $3000 for a car when he graduated from college.
      I knew ahead of time what he was looking for. If he was looking for something I didn’t agree with, it would have been less than $3000.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Well, she’s in a 2013 Chevy Cruze now. Not as cool as some other cars, but lots of safety features. She likes it – not really what she wanted, so it’s a compromise. She threatened not to drive it at first, so my wife said, “Fine, I’ll drive the Cruze, and you can drive my 187,000 mile ’08 Sienna.”
        That shut her up. I’m just hoping the Cruze will be reliable.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      My oldest kid started out in my old ’03 LeSabre, which doesn’t have curtain airbags. It was mainly out of financial necessity – I wasn’t up for taking on two car loans at the time.

      Do I wish I could have gotten her something with all the latest safety kit? Yes. But I also taught her to be a very defensive driver, and that might be the best safety feature of all.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        What amazing psychosis would have you sending your daughter out in the world as a new driver in the less safe of your two cars? If you could only afford one safe car, shouldn’t she have had it? You’re more experienced and your life is closer to over. As a parent, I would also think you’d be more concerned with her safety than your own. Wow. They say it takes all kinds, but I’ve never seen any validity to that argument.

  • avatar
    RSF

    I’m dealing with this now actually. My son’s 2012 Mustang was rear-ended a couple of days ago. The hard impact pushed him under a lifted Jeep Wrangler. Luckily the spare tire contacted the middle of his hood instead of going through the windshield. Literally the only panel of his car not damaged was the passenger door. Even the roof had a ripple from the impacts. The air bags protected him well enough I suppose; just some burns, scrapes, and cuts. However, I’m seriously doubting whether or not anything besides a full sized truck (coupe, sedan, small suv) is safe now with so many lifted and altered vehicles on the road now.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Wow, what did he get rear-ended by? I was rear-ended six weeks ago while driving a 2012 Kia Forte sedan, that we’d bought for Daughter No. 2 (new driver) just 45 minutes after buying it. The lady that ran into me was driving a Toyota Venza, which didn’t show a lot of visible damage, but the Forte was toast – the trunklid, bumper, both quarters, and the trunk floor were bent. I’m still straightening out the title mess so I can get an insurance check.

      • 0 avatar
        RSF

        He was hit by a 2003 Ford Expedition. The impact pushed the Mustang several car lengths before hitting the Jeep. Needless to say, the rear of the Mustang (crash bar, both quarters, trunk pan) was badly damaged and the front was even worse. Radiator wrapped over the engine, busted intake, etc. The front bumper didn’t contact anything. Both hood hinges broke and the rear of the hood rode halfway up the A pillars and the rear of the hood made hard contact with the windshield.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Wow. Hoods nowadays usually have hooks built into the hinges, to cause the hood to catch and buckle instead of riding up or going through the windshield (even my ’13 Tacoma has them). Do Mustangs not have those?

          • 0 avatar
            RSF

            dukeisduke- I wish i could post pictures. The hinges have hooks, but somehow the hinges snapped and the hooks didn’t catch.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Glad your son is ok, RSF :)

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      My father in law bought his daughter a single cab pickup truck as her first vehicle. She loved it because it was safe and fast (enough). He had two reasons.
      1. It was big and safe.
      2. She could fit only one other distraction in the truck.
      Sixteen years later, we still own the truck with 230k. Its our date night truck so we can remember how much he cared about her. I plan on doing the same for my kids.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Scary stuff. Glad the kid’s OK.

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    The death trap has nothing to do with the vehicle I’m piloting rather it is the dolts sitting at the controls of their SUV/CUVs that would mindlessly convert any vehicle I might be driving into my coffin.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Absolutely this.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I think that’s the point, should we be buying vehicles to protect us from others?

      • 0 avatar
        retrocrank

        There are but three options, only one of which is realistic.
        1. More strict licensing / training / enforcement, aimed at ensuring those who control automotive devices are competent, aware, and fully responsible for their actions. That ain’t happenin’.
        2. Buy a surplus Abrams tank. I think that sale ended in 2013. That ain’t happenin’.
        3. Deal with the reality that half of the population is below average and yet we give them the license to drive. And vote – so that ain’t changing.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          retro…you are way over the top with #2 Abrams tank. We are trying to have a serious discussion here. I myself am planning on buying my 15 1/2 YO a used Peterbilt 379. They can be had for a song and everyone knows a long nose Pete is plenty safe, hard to roll over and can be used a dorm room when he goes to college.

          • 0 avatar
            retrocrank

            touche’! And your solution is more likely to escape the attention of the local cops.

            (the big Pete has good looks but I’d prefer an Autocar Expeditor).

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Throw in infotainment junk too, people just love messing with their screens at red lights.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      This x100. The vehicle matters substantially less than its driver.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      +1, retrocrank.

      I’ve become EXTREMELY defensive when I’m going through an intersection when the light turns green – I’ve seen too many cases of some moron blowing through a red light at 40 or 50 mph while probably screwing around on his or her phone. Almost got hit by one of these idiots a couple of weeks ago, and he was in a Sentra.

      Since then, I look both ways…twice.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    My ’61 Renault Dauphine Gordini. A true tin can. A friend of mine killed himself in one – it rolled over into a field at a bend in the road because the swing axles “jacked” the rear end and it folded up pretty badly. I then looked under mine – the only restraint for swing axle movement down toward vertical was a factory strap (looked like leather) on each side that hung under the axle from the body. It was fun, though, and I survived somehow.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    Well Steph, with cars and pretty much everything else, you get what you pay for. If you’re lucky.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I’ve never felt safe driving SUVs/CUVs, even compared to my Crown Vic and its 1960s tech, most UVs handle like crap. Top heavy and too much bodyroll, its why some UV drivers turn really slowly.

    For older cars I never felt safe in low hoodline stuff like the “Golden Era” Honda Accord. Its basically a door wedge built from low quality metal and rust. Didn’t help that the brakes were under specced.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Mmm-hmm. My first car was a 1990 Honda Accord. And that was in 2011. It felt very unsafe next to my classmates’ F-150s and RXs.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Oui, yea that can be an issue.

        Even with my current car and its reasonable ride height, if I get stuck beside a truck I’m basically blinded to that side. Especially annoying in parking lots, I pretty much just park at the back wherever I go.

        As much as I like ride height and useful rooflines I think the “height wars” are getting to be a bit silly.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Drove my sister’s 2012 Nissan Leaf to the Atlanta Airport on the highway. The car felt insubstantial and very underpowered. Haven’t driven anything that bad in 30 years. Maybe it’s the years talking, but I rarely felt intimidated in my old MR2, and it was smaller.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Most 90s cars aren’t all that safe these days. Things that are particularly top-heavy and narrow, like the Land Rover Discovery Series I and II, or a Mercedes-Benz/Dodge/Freightliner Sprinter, make me nervous.

    Still, this is from someone who spent much of his childhood riding in the back of a 1964 Impala Coupe (327, 2-speed automatic) without rear seatbelts. And that was *in* the 90s.

  • avatar
    Pianoboy57

    I’m in line to get my dad’s 98 Silverado. Now i’m not so sure I want it. An accident a couple years ago left it without airbags. They were too expensive to replace. Up until then it was in very good condition with a little over 100K on it.

    I even experience a feeling of being unsafe in my 00′ Ranger. It’s an old design that had been around since the early 80s. The wrecked ones I see on CL are sure mangled.

  • avatar
    jtk

    70s VW Microbus. I drove a few between Grateful Dead concerts and I was always aware that there was nothing in front of me except some thin steel. And I always pictured popping the back end up when hitting a bump in the road.

    • 0 avatar
      retrocrank

      I drive one of those now. Up underneath the cab floor are two pretty substantial longitidinal “frame members”. While not as safe as a well-engineered crumple zone, it’s not just sheet metal. I think the major difference from a “normal car” in a frontal impact is that the other car would be in my ankles, and not my own engine. It’s not “safe” but at least most of the road idiots take notice of it, so I’m probably over the major safety hurdle of getting the inattentive to pay attention to the fact that there is another vehicle on the road. And it’s hardly fast enough to get into real trouble (and for what it does, the brakes are fine).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Said this before and I’ll say it again: perhaps bigger vehicles perform somewhat better in crash tests, but they can also be decisively worse at avoiding accidents. Put differently: if you’re faced with a panic-stop situation, would you rather be in a car with great brakes, or some giant SUV that won’t stop in time?

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I put drilled/slotted brakes all around on my Suburban as an added measure of safety when it was time to replace the factory stuff. Sure it does not stop like the Vette’, but it stops just fine. Not sure this argument holds water as the engineers know what they are doing and have brakes of adequate size for the vehicle in pretty much all cases.

      Where I get concerned is the professional recreator who is in the mountains with his F350 towing a camper that has a boat attached to the camper..plus gear these guys are testing the limits for sure.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Good move on the upgraded brakes. How many people go to that trouble, though?

        Meanwhile, I looked up braking stats in C/D. A new Suburban stops from 70 to 0 in 190 feet; a F350 takes 195 feet. Meanwhile, a Civic does the same stop in 160 feet, and my A3 does it in 178 feet. That could be the difference between having a crash or avoiding one.

        And if it came to having to do an emergency maneuver to avoid an accident, I’d much rather be in a smaller, more agile vehicle.

        This crash avoidability / crash survivability tradeoff isn’t something that is talked about enough.

        (And agreed 1,000% on the RV crowd – I went on vacation to Durango this summer and two hours in, I was thoroughly sick of the endless parade of fat-a** RVs – all with jaunty names like “Adventurer” or “Sunchaser” – clogging the roads. They’re a blight on the land down there in the summertime.)

      • 0 avatar
        retrocrank

        The usual tricks don’t improve braking efficiency. Slots/drilling can give you some improved initial grab when wet and improve cooling so better fade resistance (which can be helpful if towing). Boosting power assist just makes an easier pedal, nothing more. Replacing sliders with opposing pot calipers will also give a more sure feel (especially if you don’t keep up with the slider maintenance). Larger pad area can also help with the feel and fade resistance but won’t make you stop faster with non-overheated brakes.

        Unfortunately, to get better braking efficiency you need to figure out how to install bigger diameter rotors (longer lever arm). But then you start increasing the unsprung weight and now maybe the suspension settings will be wonky. The F350/boat/camper guy per se isn’t the danger – it’s when he’s cooking along at 80 mph on I-95 that he becomes a poorly controlled projectile (goes back to the dolt behind the wheel).

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I’ll take the giant SUV. My only serious panic stop situation was on a two-lane highway. I barely had a chance to use the brakes after the car came around the inside of the curve at night and crossed into my lane right in front of me.

      Fortunately, the fraction of a second they were engaged was enough to prove I was in my lane when he hit me.

      Good tires are typically the only way to improve the braking performance for a single event.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Nothing is as thrilling as driving a rear-engine, rear wheel drive skoda on the highway and discovering that the steering control is, shall we say, less than optimal.

  • avatar
    Dilrod

    My father’s 99 Olds Bravada. He’s 84 and hasn’t owned a decent set of wheels for years. It was safe enough for awhile I’m sure, but but my cousin sold it to him for $600 last year and he’s tinkered with things on it no one should touch. Ever.

    I love my Dad, but If he ever gets in an accident with that thing I hope he’s alone, because it’s going to dissipate into a cloud of powdery rust & Bondo. There’ll be nothing left but the windshield, engine block and the driver’s seat (which he may have replaced by a 5 gallon bucket by now, I’d better check on him).

    If he’s still driving when it’s time to let go of my ’13 Sonata I’ll give him that if he’ll take it, but he might think it’s pretentious & look for an ’09 Accent instead.

  • avatar

    ’67 Split window VW Bus with a 1500 cc single port engine. Too slow to be safe on the freeway. Then the steering box started to bind and the brakes were iffy.

    We were getting ready to move from Ann Arbor to Detroit but I had to make a sales call to a customer on Woodward so I took the Bus. As I downshifted and applied the brakes to make a U turn at a “Michigan left” on the boulevard, I was carrying too much speed for what little brakes I had, and the binding steering made it hard to cut the turn tightly. I ended up catching the curb on the turnaround’s exit with the right rear wheel. The combination of forces threw the Bus’ right side up in the air about 45 degrees, which is how it was when it skidded across four thankfully empty lanes of traffic on just the two left wheels.

    Once it dropped back down onto all four wheels, I pulled into a parking lot and sat there for about five minutes to let my heart stop palpitating.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    I was riding in the back of a 1987 Mitsubishi Colt hatchback – flimsy as all get out. We were t-boned by a Suburban barreling down a hill at probably 40-50 mph. The car split in half between the driver and the rear passenger space (and the rear passengers were not buckled in), but nobody got seriously hurt.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I drove my late father’s Volvo 544 a bit last year before selling it. I was driving so slowly and cautiously through residential areas that I never feared for my own safety.

    The ’87 Tercel my little brother had about ten years ago seemed worse. Regardless, it was fun to drive with a MT.

  • avatar
    Cap Hathaway

    I felt pretty unsafe back in 2012 when I got a Kia Soul as a rental to drive from Boston to Atlantic City for some gigs. I’m sure it’s a fine car by now, but the one I had was woefully underpowered, tramlined all over the place, and felt very skittish and insubstantial on the highway. To be fair, it was raining most of the way there, but I’d made that drive many times before in all weather in vehicles that didn’t leave my knuckles white. The next time I got called for a gig down that way, I weighed the option of riding my Sportster or risk possibly getting another Kia as a rental. I opted to take the bike. Much less safe, and my lower half felt like overcooked Chef Boyardee by the time I rolled into Linwood after 9 hours, but at least I wasn’t in that awful Soul.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    My wife is still toolin’ around in a 2003 Mini Cooper. It was pretty safe, considering its size, for the time. Side air bags and all that. And thankfully it is mostly city driving but I do fear her getting clobbered by a F250 or something like that.

    She’ll be taking over my 2014 Mustang – which still isn’t the safest car on the road – but at least it’s a larger car.

  • avatar
    stereorobb

    these really are unsafe cars. i can think of at least 15 fatal crashes involving these right off the top of my head. they are not good cars. they are throwaway econoboxes but they do seem to have staying power. they are always beat to hell but i see them everywhere.

    only car i ever had that i felt truly unsafe in and honestly pretty miserable in all the way around, was a 2003 kia spectra that a roommate just abandoned at my house when he broke his lease. it was the equivalent of him squatting and taking a dump in my driveway. it ran and drove but what a wretched wretched little thing it was. not even worthy as a junk bomb around the neighborhood car. it was a prison on wheels, had zero guts and could barley get out of its own way. it was dull grey with grey interior. nothing special or cool about it in any way at all. not to mention it was tin can cheap and cars passing in traffic felt like it would be blown off the road when i was in it. this car didnt deserve to be loved. it deserved to be scored and picked on. when i drove it it made me angry and want to fight people.

    i gave it to my sister who is notoriously awful to her cars and doesnt do even the basic maintenance to them. she put it out of its misery fairly quickly. ending the sad pathetic insignificant cars life, in a sad pathetic way.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    The last vehicle I drove that felt slightly unsafe would have been my 98 T10 Blazer. Short wheelbase, narrow stance, high center of gravity led to that feeling wonky.


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