By on May 2, 2019

Image: FCAToday’s truck trio includes three very expensive rigs that aren’t likely be used for hauling duties or any other truck-type responsibilities. And that’s a good thing, because they’re loaded up on equipment and leather, and covered in nice metallic paint. Which nice truck gets used as kindling? Let’s find out.

Today we proceed in order of displacement.

GMC Sierra Denali

Image: Steph Willems/TTACThe top of the regular duty truck pyramid at GMC is the Sierra Denali. In crew cab and short box configuration (the one people buy), asking price reads $60,495. For that cash, there will be a tried-and-true 6.2-liter V8 under the hood. With 420 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque routed through the 10-speed automatic, towing capacity rests at 9,400 pounds. You won’t reach the estimated 20 mpg highway with that sort of weight at the back, but you won’t really be towing anyway. Enjoy the real wood trim while you wait to pick the kids up from school.

Ram 1500 Limited

2019 Ram 1500The most expensive Ram 1500 consumers can buy is the Limited trim, which sits above the Tradesman, Laramie, Big Horn, and Rebel in the truly vast trim tree offered by the good people at FCA. For $59,385, Ram hooks up a hybrid system to the beefy 5.7-liter Hemi V8. Combined output is 395 horsepower and 410 lb-ft of torque, netting a highway rating of 22 mpg. Owners can tow a whopping 12,750 pounds, and the tree decorating the dash is real.

Jeep Gladiator Rubicon

Image: FCAThe most unique expensive truck offering in our trio is the brand new Jeep Gladiator, in Rubicon trim. A Wrangler with a bit at the back and a removable roof, Gladiator has the familiar 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 at the front. 285 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque are there for the taking, and Gladiator can tow 4,500 pounds. I know you’re shook right now, screaming at your screen “The Gladiator Rubicon is only $45,500!” And you’d be right, but the Rubicon is currently retailing at $60,000 because of that fun additional dealer markup. It plays with these other two for now.

Which one gets a Burn, and which would you actually Buy?

[Images: Steph Willems / TTAC, RAM, Jeep]

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85 Comments on “Buy/Drive/Burn: Expensive Trucks You Won’t Use for Truck Things...”


  • avatar
    ttiguy

    This one is easy.

    GMC = Buy bc of 6.2L V8 and reliability
    Ram = Drive bc of that pretty interior
    Jeep = Burn bc it just looks kinda stoopid

    In reality, the F150 Limited/Platinum/Lariat should be in this comparison NOT the Jeep. Pricing aside, it is a different type of truck

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Are they that reliable though?

      • 0 avatar
        ttiguy

        Not really sure what reliability info you’re referencing but in the past I owned a GMT800 era 10-year old Sierra that was rock solid…. Aside from a tailgate that would occasionally get stuck (that’s why you see so many with the tailgate latch trim removed).

        The fact is these are all insanely priced and a horrible value for what most people really need. I have given up trucks for my suburban lifestyle. When the need arises, I either just get crap delivered to the house or go rent a truck from Enterprise/Hertz for a few bucks. the rest of time i get to drive something other than one of these oversized turds.

        I gotta think most of these are sold as leases which is what enables prices to go higher and higher since the sticker price is somewhat irrelevant to consumers. The only thing that matters is residual value.

        • 0 avatar
          Zipster

          TT:

          But wouldn’t a truck enhance your image and make you feel better about yourself?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I pity the person who buys a truck as a status symbol. If they don’t have a need for open carry, they’re buying the wrong vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          What people really need is full size sedans with big trunks, but they won’t buy them. These trucks are crew cab RWD sedans at much higher prices (and lower fuel economy) than a full size car would be.

          That may change if they put a “4-door coupe” roofline on a crew cab and rake the windshield and hood for aerodynamics. Then it won’t matter, since full size sedans will already be dead, and the FWD minivan would be the only other choice.

          • 0 avatar
            namesakeone

            I read somewhere, “As long as [Americans] would rather face public pillory than admit what they really need is a minivan, we’ll have SUVs.” I wonder if the same is true of conventional cars and full-sized pickup trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Current GM Chinesium /= GMT800, you can thank Lutz and his drive to outsource to China for that.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Lutz helped drive GM into bankruptcy and yet he thinks he can tell other companies how to better manage their products and money.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Lutz helped drive GM into bankruptcy”

            nonsense. GM started going bankrupt in 1974.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @JimZ: Well, Lutz sure didn’t ‘t stop the fall, now did he?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Are they that reliable though?”

        Compared to two nearly brand new FCA products? Probably.

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      But spelling “stupid” “stoopid” is perfectly ok with you?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      This is my order but not my reasoning:

      GMC – buy – 6.2L V8 is the stuff of legend – it will be venerated for years to come

      Ram – drive – because it is supposed to be amazing to drive, very “un-truck”

      Jeep – the reality of this exercise is picking trucks that won’t be used as trucks – this is the most truck of the trucks and is going to be feel, ride, and sound like a truck – given the exercise – this one gets burned

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Buy the Gladiator, because you’ll probably get most of your money back and you’ll have a pretty cool truck until you’re tired of it. Drive the Ram, ’cause I want to. I guess burn the GMC, because that’s all that’s left

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Yeah, in agreement with you, as much as the Gladiator MSRP makes me cringe…

      Buy the Gladiator. Will retain most value and is the most flexible. Heck the top comes off, that alone makes it the most fun.

      Drive the RAM – most comfortable and streetable vehicle of the three

      Burn the GMC – its not a bad truck, but the competition is tough, the interior leaves a LOT to be desired, and the chrome is overbearing

      Truthfully though, Id be happy to have any of the three in my driveway…

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Buy: GMC Denali
    If I’m going to not use it to tow, I want to be able to not tow over 9,000 lbs.

    Drive: Dodge Ram
    Good enough to borrow once in a while but not a fan of Chrysler as a concept anymore so, meh, on purchasing.

    Burn: Jeep.
    Because it’s a Jeep thing and I don’t want to understand.

    Editorial note:
    “The most unique expensive truck…”
    Unique is a binary state. Either something is or it isn’t unique. You can’t have varying states of uniqueness.

  • avatar
    HeeeeyJake

    I think you posted the Ram’s V6 towing capacity but…

    Buy: Jeep (resale)
    Drive: Ram (most refined)
    Burn: GMC (I’m not a fan, but I bet the engine/trans is awesome)

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Buy: Ram 1500 Limited. Actually looks somewhat tasteful compared to the wretched grille expansion and chrome overload taking place with other models. Plus the interior isn’t a bad place to spend a lot of time.

    Drive: GMC Sierra Denali. Might be very comfortable for a long, quiet trip but GM just can’t make a tasteful interior and the price…ugh.

    Burn: Jeep Gladiator Rubicon. When I read “$60,000” due to the dealers, I started looking for lighter fluid! In no way, shape, or form is this worth $60,000, not even with the amazing resale value that the Wranglers (and maybe the Gladiator) have. Plus, I still don’t like that Jeep is messing with an icon by adding a truck bed. So…burn baby burn.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      You don’t like the 4-door Unlimited either, do you?

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        There’s just something “off” about its looks – not proportioned correctly. It’s like looking at something lopsided and not quite putting your finger on what’s wrong. Ditto the extended wheelbase Wrangler. I love the Wrangler. I’ve taken a few offroad and if I still lived in an area where I was surrounded by offroad trails, there’d be one parked outside. But I like the traditional Wrangler, not these offshoots that (to me) have diluted the brand.
        …steps down from the soapbox!

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          How have variations of the original diluted the brand? You can still get a basic Wrangler all day long if that’s what you want

          You must really hate Porsche

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            When people think Jeep, I’m guessing that a lot of them think of the vehicle that you can take anywhere, beat the snot out of, rinse off, and hell, maybe even help with winning a war a few generations ago. Adding more doors, making them longer, adding pickup beds – that makes them look and feel more like suburban vehicles compared to the rugged beat the hell out of them vehicles their image conveys. Anyway, that’s what the Cherokee and other Jeeps are for.
            As for Porsche…I think the TTAC staff can start an entire article about how Porsche has sold a chunk of their soul in the quest for more sales. Every time I see a Macan, a part of me dies on the inside. Besides, I don’t think selling 500 special edition 911 models meant for the track or the inside of a climate controlled garage dilutes the 911 “brand” compared to softening the Wrangler by turning it into all things for all people.

        • 0 avatar
          2drsedanman

          “There’s just something “off” about its looks – not proportioned correctly”.

          It definitely looks better and more proportioned as a single cab, although most people want the four door. Maybe some day they will make a single cab version. I’m not sure of the numbers (or care enough to look them up), but I suspect the four door Jeeps outsell the two doors (same with four door trucks).

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      I’m finding Gladiators <$50,000. I guess the dealers near me aren't total a-holes?

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    Buy the Denali in spite of the less than stellar ratings for reliability and repairs that have cropped up this decade.

    Burn the Jeep. That will just hasten the self destructive tendency of the thing to kill itself.

    Drive the Ram and pray that it doesn’t follow the heritage of Fiat and Chrysler to die during the test drive.

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      None of my FCA products have ever “died” during a test drive. How ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar

      I daily drive two Daimler era Chrysler products. Honestly of the twenty plus vehicles I have owned over the years they fall right around average on the reliability scale. Subaru and VW fall to the bottom. At work we have several Pentstar minivans and they hold up will usually get traded in at 7-10 years old with no real issues. We have a few modern era FCA products in my extended family, are they as reliable as the Toyota’s no but they seem to run neck and neck with the Nissan’s Subaru’s and Mazda’s.

  • avatar

    Did you just want to use an image of a Jeep Gladiator on the over for this article Corey? It’s not in the same class of truck as the GMC or Dodge. And forget dealer markups (as they’re slowly disappearing now) the SuperCrew Platinum F150 Starts at $55K and can be optioned up to $67k without dipping into the Accessories category of the configurator.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Burn: GMC–Gross overkill for how it will be used;
    Drive: Ram Limited–Bigger and perhaps more plush than my Colorado but my Colorado tows more for having a smaller engine;
    Buy: Gladiator Rubicon–Still strong enough to tow a decent camper and can take that camper places the other two can’t.

    Now if only their fuel economy could match up to the Colorado’s.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    60 grand? Burn ’em all.

    • 0 avatar
      993cc

      And buy a 5×8 utility trailer to pull behind your car.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        When I was a kid, every 3rd house had a 4’x6′ utility trailer sitting outside. Most were home or locally built. It’s like we’ve lost a couple of generations who know how to tow.
        :-(

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Not everybody has a place they can store a 5×8 utility trailer…or a larger one or a smaller one. I have an HOA that permits NO outside storage of any kind (unless it’s put into an approved shed, unattached to the house itself.) Nor do I have a garage in which to store things or park my vehicles. As such, my only choice for carrying outsized loads is a pickup truck.

      • 0 avatar

        I have a 5×8 utility trailer and a midsize SUV it does function as well but it’s no where near as convenient as a pickup. I borrowed back my old dakota from my father while my parents were away for a week (he bought it for HD and dump runs) and I found my self doing truck things (scrap metal run moving furniture) I had put off just because it was easier with the truck. Given how refined trucks have become and some of the mileage increases in recent years it seems like they have become easy to justify if you can afford the price of entry.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    Buy: Ram. Mopar!
    Drive: Jeep. Meh, not a Jeep guy.
    Burn: GMC OMG MY EYES!!!!

  • avatar
    arach

    This is super easy, but I don’t know how everyone is so wrong?

    Buy: Jeep. Its the only one of these that will have any cool factor or be worth owning 30 years from now.

    Drive: Dodge. Most comfortable ride, best refined, amazing interior. Only problem is reliability, which is a non-factor for this category

    Burn: GMC. It has nothing going for it. its ugly, low quality, outdated interior, miserable fuel economy…. nothing of value for the premise of this BDB of trucks you won’t use for truck things. (The only argument for the GMC is to use it for truck things…)

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      What’s a “Dodge”? ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Ugh, I struggle with this too. I still want to call a Ram ( sorry RAM) a Dodge. Much like I want to call the outdoor amphitheater/concert site an hour from me “Star Lake” when it hasn’t been called that for at least 15 years. ( Now currently the KeyBank Pavilion, about its 5th name change)

  • avatar
    ajla

    Buy the GMC. I want to marry the engine and I like the tailgate.

    Drive the Gladiator. It’s a convertible and I can get it in brought colors.

    Burn the Ram. Everyone rips on the styling of the GM trucks (and they aren’t great), but this squinty-faced, no crosshair’d blob from FCA gets a pass from people for some reason. I don’t get it. The lower trims are a bit better, but in any configuration I do not consider the Ram 1500 a handsome truck.
    Add in the mild hybrid system and a slower overall vehicle and it gets the fire.

    • 0 avatar

      To me ram made it a less handsome truck but compared to other options out there I think it is still the best looking. The headlights on the GM options and Ford annoy me, the Full size Tundra was always beat with an ugly stick and the Nissan is trying to hard to be the biggest out there.

      The mild hybrid I think is an option on the Limited (it’s standard on the Penta star but I think the limited is hemi only). If you look at the forumns on the hybrid I would hold off a year or two some people love them but others have had numerous software issues. If they can sort it out think it’s a good idea in the long run.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @ajla: And yet I consider the RAM the best-looking truck of the bunch.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Hmmmm Tough choice !

    Buy the GMC…Just so i can say “I bought a Denali equipped with the 6.2 Litre ”

    Drive the RAM until warranty runs out . I love the interior . Long term reliability ????

    Burn the Jeep.. If I wanted the Jeep experience (and I don’t ) … a nicely done Rubicon would be my choice.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    Buy: Ram because of the stellar interior and air suspension.
    Drive: Gladiator – Long live three pedals!
    Burn: GMC. GM has jumped the shark in the truck realm for me. GM trucks used to be my preference. Over the last 20 years, their products have slipped mightily and their market share reflects that.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Buy: Ram. A gimme in a field this compromised. Pretty good even against its real competition (ie. Ford King Ranch). Feels and rides expensive. I couldn’t sit upright in the back with the sunroof, the driving position is a lot less open than the last one was, the dial shifter is still stupid. But still pretty good.

    Drive: GM. Love, love, love the 6.2, and it even has a column shifter, but in every other respect this one would be in the burn pile too. Garish styling. Bunker driving position, at least by truck standards. Bed sides too high. Dinky 24 gallon gas tank. Ad campaign with road cyclists. Not as in “look how many of these spandex covered fruitcakes our truck will plow through” either. Could it get any worse?

    Yes it can. The Jeep. Burn. Burn it again. Doesn’t work as anything other than look at me, which has been the real point of the Wrangler all along so they will of course sell a zillion of these too. But being 3 feet too long breaks all of the easy urban convertible things that the regular Jeep does well while not adding many of the things that other 19 foot trucks do well. Meh powertrain, LOL refinement, LOL price tag, total miss.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Personally, I’d recommend driving the Jeep before you pan it. Sure, it’s overpriced right now but it will come down to a more ‘sensible’ price fairly soon.

      Meanwhile, you’re only half right about the ‘look at me’ aspect. The Gladiator in stock Rubicon form can outperform ALL other factory stock 4×4 pickup trucks when it comes to getting into remote areas. It’s narrower than any full-sized truck to which it is being compared, letting it get through places those others can’t manage while having a flexibility and ground clearance that would have every other truck damaging its undercarriage or getting hung up. Only the Wranglers offer better with their shorter wheelbase and shorter overhangs. That doesn’t mean everybody who buys one needs that capability, but for those who do need that capability, the Wrangler-based truck is the best of the lot–followed by the Toyota Tacoma.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Buy the Gladiator because you can get it with a manual

    Burn every vehicle that does not come with a manual

  • avatar
    Ermel

    Burn ’em all and buy three crewcab Volkswagens instead: a Splitty, a Loaf and an AWD Vanagon.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I would imagine this is a conundrum that truck buyers find themselves in very often in the real world. What does the truck buyer who doesn’t actually need a truck buy?

    Buy: Jeep Gladiator. Looks fantastic compared to any other truck, removable roof, out of this world cool compared to any other pickup truck.

    Burn: Sierra Denali. For poseurs who don’t like money or simply enjoy supporting the UAW.
    Burn: Ram 1500. Its actually the least d’baggy looking Ram in a long time, but why not drive something good looking and cool if you dont need the capability, which is most people.

  • avatar
    Cranky50

    Burn them all and just get a good Toyota. I’ve been burned by both GM and Chrysler and would like to return the favor.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Buy the Jeep because resale value.

    Drive the Ram because the GM product is too ugly to be seen in.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, keep in mind this is coming from a dyed-in-the-wool car guy who has absolutely no desire or need for a truck…

    Buy: Jeep. As my kids would say, it’s cool a.f. Low depreciation would be the icing on the cake.
    Drive: Ram. If I had to get stuck with a full size pickup, this would be the one I’d take.
    Burn: GMC. It’s better looking than the Silverado, but that’s not saying much. And screw the “but, 6.2” argument…buy a ‘Vette or Camaro convertible instead.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Getting your grandparents in the backseat of a Camaro or Corvette is a b*tch though.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        LOL…true, plus they might have heart failure if you drive too fast.

        This is why the Almighty made Enterprise Rent-A-Car.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          My aunt and uncle (both in their late 50s at the time) were traveling out west for my wedding in 2012. My 80 year old grandmother (and her walker) was in tow.

          Flew into Phoenix because they wanted to see the Grand Canyon before they came to Gallup. Enterprise tried to “upgrade” them to a Camaro. (eye roll)

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            My grandma had a early-’70s LeMans, and drove like a bat out of hell – I do believe she’d have taken the Camaro.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Well I can’t see buying any of these 3, but if they were the last pickups on earth then I’d have to buy the GMC, drive the Jeep, only topless and burn the Ram.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If I’m buying a truck just to say I have a truck then

    Buy: Gladiator
    Drive: Denali (use that huge honking V8, disable the traction control, and lay rubber.)
    Burn (by default): RAM

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Easy one:

    Buy—Gladiator. It’s a 345 Hemi and single cab body short of my perfect pickup and I loved my Scrambler in college. I’ll be doing LOTS of real truck/Jeep stuff with it.

    Drive—Ram. The limited trim has zero appeal to me and a hybrid of any kind is a HARD nope. Make it an electric blue Rebel crew cab std Hemi and it’s a tossup for a buy.

    Burn—GMC. That garish blinged out luxo-barge is an eyesore. Everything I’ve always hated about broughamed cars in an even more expensive package that defeats the purpose of the base vehicle and with added Chinesium. Burn, baby…BURN!!!!

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    You do know the Gladiator’s MSRP can reach over 60k, not dealer mark-up? Yeah they’re ridiculously expensive and I’m sure some dealers will try to add on, but they can reach 60k with just options.

    Anyways..
    Buy: Ram – Best driving, best interior, actually feels like it’s worth the money.
    Drive: Jeep – This is tough, honestly. The Jeep is not a 60k vehicle, yet it would be more fun to drive than the GMC, so it gets a pass.
    Burn: GMC – Don’t really want to burn the Denali, it’s a good truck with a great powertrain, but the interior is straight from 2012 and doesn’t bring much innovation besides the silly tailgate. Gm really got blindsided by RAM.

  • avatar

    I don’t have a real answer for the question because I like all these trucks but I guess burn the GMC just because GM penny pinching is still alive and well.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I can’t believe people pay $45,000 and only get a V6. It’s an acceptable engine at $35,000, but closing in on $50k it’s a joke.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Do you only buy used?

      I had a hell of a time teaching my (1951-born) Father that he wasn’t finding any mid-trim V6 fleet specials for Mother’s last car purchase.

      Dad still believes a v6 is the economy engine. Dad doesn’t exactly live in 2019.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    Buy: GMC. Kind of a toss up with RAM, a lot of family has RAMs and they seem to nag you to death with problems after a year or two.

    Drive: RAM.

    Burn: Gladiator, it doesn’t seem like that great of a Jeep, or that great of a truck, either, especially at that price point.

    I’d be more inclined to buy a Ford F-150 upper trim level, but not on the menu here today, and I am in the market for a new truck, btw.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    ill take a used JK sport X and get that $5k pickup kit
    https://uncrate.com/mopar-jk-8-jeep-kit/
    burn all 3.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Burn the GMC. I’ve never liked GM trucks, though with a gun to my head, a GMC over a Chevy.

    The next two, in context, are a challenge.

    Buy- RAM- My brother has a ’16 4×4 with the V6 that towed my Mustang 250 miles with little complaint. It was comfortable and smooth. The new truck is even nicer.

    The downside (and a possible “Drive” rating) is the usual caveat: FCA long term reliability and durability and depreciation. Here in the rust belt, 6-10 year old Rams are quite rusty compared to the others, they don’t hold their value like Ford or GM trucks.

    Buy- Gladiator. It’s a novelty and there’s pent-up demand among diehard Jeep folks. You ever price a used Wrangler? Stupid money new, stupid money used. I read an opinion, I believe on TTAC at some point, that Jeep is to be viewed like the Land Rover/Range Rover of America. Kind of novel, national treasure,etc. and a premium is paid, even if they aren’t the best. But unlike the Brits, Jeeps maintain value.

    With a soft top and minimal options, it’s a truck and convertible. It can do lot of things and I dig the looks.

    The downside (and possible Drive not buy) is it’s a Wrangler. I had one as rental, a long time ago. 4.0 inline six time ago but still a TJ series. It was fun for a few days, but the bouncy ride, noise and everything else that makes it suck as a vehicle made it kind of wearying to drive. I know the new ones are better vehicles, but still it’s that kind of money for a jack of all trades, master of none vehicle. The pickup bed adds utility though.

    Meh. YOLO. The Gladiator to buy, the Ram to lease (drive). I’ll get my money out of that Gladiator. But I’m not buying during this initial frenzy, even in hypothetical terms.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @gearhead: I strongly recommend test-driving a new Wrangler, especially the ‘Unlimited’ and Gladiator. First off, they haven’t had an inline six for over 12 years and the ride in general is much smoother and quieter. I had a JKU as a daily driver for 9 years and never had to complain about its ride. As I understand it, the JL-series is even smoother.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        @Vulpine. That’s why I qualified my Wrangler experience with the fact it was really old, 2000 or 2001. I don’t doubt the current Jeep, especially the new ones are much better vehicles. But they are still far too much money. I don’t find 38k steep in the light of current truck prices for a Gladiator Sport, but 60k with options for a Rubicon? At least Gladiator gives you a bed and Jeep-stuff at 40k, It’s a multi-purpose vehicle for that money.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          — Just sayin’, gearhead. Had this thing come out one year sooner, I’d probably be driving a less-than-Rubicon version now instead of my Colorado; they simply took too long to get this thing out and I gave up on the Ford as soon as they announced their engine choice.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The kid that adopted me as his “dad” bought a new Wrangler (2dr) and while it is miles ahead of the older versions in the ride dept, I don’t think it is something I could live with on a daily driver. The much longer wheelbase of the Gladiator would seem to only improve the ride quality, but at the sacrifice of one of the qualities I really appreciated in driving his, the easy parking and maneuverability in tight spots that I definitely appreciated about driving the 2dr.


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