By on March 26, 2019

2018 Chevrolet Bolt - Image: Chevrolet

Tim Cain’s observations of his quaint island’s driving habits revealed that electric vehicle ownership, though seemingly feasible given the distance to the sea in all directions, is about as rare as a happy ending on Black Mirror.

Cain, secretly funded by Big Oil and no doubt a part of other shadowy conspiracies, cynically believes that, outside of major urban centers, EVs are generally seen as impractical and unnecessarily expensive conveyances, given their limitations in range and capability. Thus, premonitions of the impending end of gas — or cars in general — are both premature and overblown.

Does your neighborhood’s vehicular landscape reflect this?

Lest anyone thing I was being serious earlier (this is the internet, after all), allow me to say that Tim Cain does not take his marching orders from Exxon-Mobil or BP. That said, I can sympathize with his observations and resulting assertions. While Casa Steph’s surroundings are decidedly more urban (and infinitely less idyllic) than Mr. Cain’s neighborhood, EVs are still considerably rarer than one would assume. Hell, until nine months ago, there was an obscene government incentive available for the purchase of just such a vehicle.

The only electric or PHEV residing in a three-block area is a neighbor’s BMW i3. It stays tucked in the garage, seldom seeing the light of day. A Ford F-150 Raptor loiters a few doors down. I recently saw a pair of Dodge Avengers simultaneously pull into driveways while walking down that same street. It would seem that no one’s trying to keep up with the Johnsons in this hood.

Count me among the many who question the anticipated demand for the electric vehicle tsunami headed our way. While the early product ripples began lapping at our shores early this decade, surging every higher up the beach in the years since, the main event should swamp dealers (and presumably driveways) by 2021-22. Ranges will be substantial — up to and above 300 miles. Bodies will be bold, boxy, and beautiful, far removed from the nerdy, non-Tesla runabouts of yesteryear. Perhaps most importantly, many of these EVs will bear badges worthy of people inhabiting a certain social strata (old money types, wizened bankers, stuffy but image-conscious senior bureaucrats and diplomats, etc).

The type not given to fandom of mass-market Japanese efficiency and Silicon Valley tech bro wunderthings.

Anyway, that’s our supposed future. Looking around your neighborhood, do you see evidence of a growing consumer acceptance of this new way of driving? Perhaps more importantly, do you see any evidence that your friends and neighbors, in the absence of a Euro-style, legislation-driven ICE disincentive campaign, are prepared to give green a chance?

[Image: General Motors]

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78 Comments on “QOTD: Are Your Neighbors the Special Ones?...”


  • avatar
    jatz

    This recent slew of EV articles is kind of like hate porn.

    It’s like whenever I’m in the dumps I find some time alone to image search “donne grasse” and am rewarded with many brunettes.

    A steady diet, though, kinda dulls the response.

  • avatar
    Dale Houston

    I am surprised the upswing in Teslas I have seen since the Model 3 became available. They’re not quite common, but I am seeing more of them. There are a fair number of Model S and Model 3’s in our area. I see the occasional Model X.

    Teslas outnumber all of the other electrics I see by a pretty wide margin.

  • avatar
    Dale Houston

    I am surprised by the upswing in Teslas I have seen since the Model 3 became available. They’re not quite common, but I am seeing more of them. There are a fair number of Model S and Model 3’s in our area. I see the occasional Model X.

    Teslas outnumber all of the other electrics I see by a pretty wide margin.

  • avatar
    jatz

    There may indeed be a few EVs lurking around here but since my last pickup I’ve lost the high ground from which to see them in traffic.

  • avatar
    redapple

    My next door neighbor is on his 3rd Leaf. Thanks largely to the HUGE freebies Georgia hands out. His other car is an Explorer.

    Other than that? I might see a tesla once a week here in a far north atlanta suburb.

  • avatar

    A very small percentage of EV afoot here (less than 5% easily).

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Model 3 the next street over. I did see an i3 a few times at a neighbors house but it disappeared; maybe some kids visiting their parents. Also saw an i8 several times at the grocery store; and a few blocks over there is a Tesla S; and further on a Leaf.

    Fairly affluent neighborhood that I just managed to buy in – at the nosebleed seats.

    There is the couple I know who have two Honda Fits (I know – not an EV) but they don’t mind driving econo cars since it works for them with two small kids and mostly city driving. I wouldn’t be surprised to see EVs for their next car.

    Most surprising thing – there aren’t many pickup trucks around my neighborhood. The Yukon or Odyssey is a lot more popular than the F150. Lots of little kids.

  • avatar
    2004_Z06

    I see a fair number of Tesla Model S, but have not seen any other Teslas except a Roadster quite a few years ago. Haven’t seen a Leaf or a Bolt yet here in NE Ohio. A guy I knew at work had a Volt but I don’t see them around either.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    From the length of their driveway, that’s about all that would fit.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    No electrics, no hybrids.
    Lots of crew cab half ton pickups and SUVs and crossovers.
    When I drive past dealers, I see many acres of pickup trucks and not much small stuff. I assume they stock what sells.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      Same here. My fave Home Depot is next to a Ford dealer with a perpetual *sea* of new pickups and they’re just completing a big expansion on the building.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I see lots of high-end pickups / SUVs AND Teslas in the area I live in.

      The common thread isn’t politics – the area I live in is primarily made up of Sean Hannity-type conservatives. The common thread is affluence – people with money like to drive fancy pickups, luxury SUVs, and Teslas these days.

  • avatar
    285exp

    I live in a southern city, metropolitan area population of around 400k, no EVs in the fairly affluent historic district where I live except for a Model S, which I assume is owned by the owner of a new local brewpub, that’s always parked outside of the business, hooked up to the only charging station on the premises. I’ve seen one or two other S’s, a Model 3, and a smattering of Leafs around town. There’s one 8 bay Supercharger station tucked behind one of the shopping malls and a couple more regular charging stations at area hotels. The closest Tesla service center is about 350 miles away in Atlanta. My state doesn’t offer any significant financial incentives to purchase EVs, but I think the brewpub owner qualified for a tax break to install the charging station that he uses to keep his Tesla topped up.

    I suspect it may take a bit longer for the Green New Deal to get here.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    In Toronto, the Model 3 seems to quickly be catching up with the lease-special 3-Series/C-Class/A4 as borderline common, although I’m sure part of that is how a bunch of Ontario’s preorders were prioritized before the EV credits were rescinded. The Bolt/2nd gen Leaf aren’t exactly common, but seeing one is close to a daily occurrence at lease (certainly, I know there’s a Bolt virtually right across the road from my building, in an upper-middle class, moderately conservative neighbourhood.

    Also, the only Mitsubishi Outlanders on the road now seem to be the PHEV ones, and there’s a pretty healthy percentage of Pacificas wearing green plates.

  • avatar
    arach

    I’ve seen a couple of teslas on the highways during my work commute. No one in our neighborhood or town has any. Never seen a Bolt. Did see a leaf once, and an i3.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Guy across the street has a bought-used Leaf, an ~2007 GT500 convertible and a ’64 Mustang.

    I see a lot of Teslas in the big parking garage at work. 3-4 Leafs. 3-4 other PHEVs. No Bolts.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I love contrast and irony, in my subdivision of about 25 houses there are a surprising amount of people who have a thing for unusual cars, among my favorites is my neighbor who drives a Tesla who lives right next door to my neighbor who drives a Hummer H2. As far as I can tell they seem to get along and genuinely like each other. Strange world

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Inside the Atlanta city limits on the east-side. Teslas are *very* popular—even after the state ended its “generous” credits. Of course there are still a ton of Nissan Leafs on the ground—left over from when the state credits made them “free”—a lot of folks kept them after their leases expired—and you do see an occasional new one, along with the occasional bolt and bmw electrics floating around.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Teslas, Leafs and Bolts are pretty common here in the Bay Area, as one might expect due to the tech nerd influence, moderate weather and proximity of Tesla HQ.

    I do agree with your assessment that the switch to EVs will be much slower and more limited than the industry hype would suggest.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    I live in a town of roughly 10k people on the eastern border of Ohio. There is a university here, and I live in the closest residential neighborhood to it, which means most of my neighbors are employees of or students at that university. Most households seem to be composed of large families or multiple students. Pittsburgh is between 30 minutes and an hour away, depending on where you’re going. Any other population center is at least a two-hour drive. There’s a Model X in town, but other than that, I only see BEVs in Pittsburgh. Part of that may have to do with the temperature extremes, but I think more of it has to do with the limited number of parking spaces relative to to household size – people fill their driveways and create parking spaces out of front yard. And if the other houses are like mine, they’re older homes with outdated electrical service and wiring that likely would not support fast charging. Many homes have freestanding garages with 20 amp service on a single breaker run to them. So, short answer: no BEVs, and I’m guessing it’s due to logistics and cost, not only of the vehicle, but also of adapting old housing stock to fast charging requirements.

    Edit: There’s an Outlander PHEV owned by one of the kids across the street. I’ve never seen it plugged in.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    In well-to-do but by no means the wealthiest suburb of Boston, I see more Tesla Model S’s than any of the large Eurobarges, and about as many Model 3s as new 3-series or C-Classes. Bolts, i3s, etc. are still a bit of a novelty, though my wife has her heart set on a Bolt for her next car (I’m trying to push her towards a Kona). It’s a families-and-finance area, so the most popular vehicles around us are E-classes and Honda Pilots.

  • avatar
    incautious

    there is about 6 Tesla’s here in my town in the northeast.Most of them driven by women whom don’t appear to have a day job owned by hipsters who want to feel they helping the environment while living in their 7500 sq ft homes. Funny but there are more Alfa’s and Maserati’s here than Tesla’s. Oh and 2 Mclaren’s and an Enzo too.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Hardly any EVs in my bedroom suburb north of Boston, which is kinda surprising. The commutes are awful around here where at least a hybrid would excel.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Rural Quebec here. No EVs, no Hybrids. Lots of GM’s, base Honda/Toyota, simple stuff.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    In Fargo/Moorhead I’ve seen a few Teslas – first S’s, then an X or two, now lately and mostly the 3’s. The Teslas tend to be in the same parts of town where you see BMWs / Mercedeses / Porsches. There are a few Volts around too. EVs seem not to be a good proposition here for people who don’t have at least a driveway of their own, and about half of housing units are apartments with 120V to the garage at best, plus we have a large college student population who just hope to be able to find a spot in their assigned lot.

    Outside of town I’ve seen S’s on the highway, usually going quite slow i.e. getting passed by speed-limited fleet semis.

    In my hometown in South Dakota I can’t recall seeing anything further along the EV path than Priuses.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      I have seen nothing but some Prius or Volts in the Dakotas and Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. In most of “flyover” country, an EV just doesn’t make much sense if you don’t live in an airport hub city, because it will typically be faster to drive than fly for any trip of less than 500-600 miles, and stopping to recharge 2-3 times for 30-45 minutes each is not something most road trippers want to do. Plus in the hinterlands, many people actually do pull boats, campers, snowmobiles, farm wagons, etc. and therefore need something with some towing capacity, which EVs are marginal at best for. And “heavy” rush hour traffic in Sioux Falls, Fargo, or Rapid City means your commute home is going to be 15 minutes instead of 10, and parking is always easy, so a little EV commuter car isn’t really relevant. Throw in brutal cold winters and EVs make even less sense in the great white north, not to mention a fair bit of power is generated with coal so it is very arguable on whether there is any environmental benefit. I just don’t see EVs being more than a niche product in most of “flyover” country anytime soon.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I live an affluent suburb of Denver. There are quite a few Teslas in my neighborhood, and in the area I work in (the Tech Center) they’re thick on the ground.

    Curiously enough, there are a lot fewer EVs in the northern suburbs of Denver (Broomfield, Interlochen area) than you’d expect, and I don’t see many at all in Boulder, which amazes me. Then again, considering that a house in Boulder costs at least a mil these days, maybe the folks up there prefer a cheaper car. Probably explains why Tesla doesn’t have a showroom in that part of town.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I live in a slightly grungy close-in “suburban” area in the Wash DC region surrounded by high SES areas. You’d see most EVs and hybrids on a given day, except iMiev, which I’ve never seen (has anybody?). Except for trades, pickups aren’t really that practical although some people have them and new military transplants sometimes keep them. I live in a condo complex with underground parking with no EV hookups, so except for an i3, I’ve never seen one, and the residents are solidly middle-income, with many retirees, so tons of the standard Camcord Civolla livery and the newer striving immigrants stick with reliable makes, or leased Europeans. In my current circle, I know of no EV owners. More common is acquaintances (including neighbors) who dispensed with car ownership altogether. Cabs, Uber, and transit are all plentiful, basic needs are walkable, and a lot of people travel for work (or never leave home).

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I have seen a Model S in the local parade a couple times and one in the wild. I have seen a new model 3 in the wild too. The 3 is much uglier than pictures show.

    I work in a town of about 60k people. There are probably more around, I just have not seen them.

    My neighbors are all farmers. No electrics there. We do have two Prius in the parking lot at work (390 employees).

  • avatar
    Fred

    I live near Yosemite and I’ve seen 1 Tesla around my neighborhood. Quite a few Priuses. Not much else electric motor/battery wise. This was the same west of Houston in a rural area. When I worked an electric car with a 200 mile range would of made a good commute car, but I think that’s about all I could do with it. So I used a truck for both hauling stuff and commuting. Gas mileage be damned.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    In my area of about 80 homes in SoCal, there are 2 or 3 Tesla’s, at least 2 Leaf’s, a few Volt’s, 15-20 Prius, and some other hybrids. Still at least 90% IC vehicles. I have seen most of the other electrics on the roads, but that is no surprise as nearly all the makers have offices in the area. They could be test or press cars.

  • avatar
    tedward

    It sure looks like it’s going slowly, as I only see the occasional EV. OTOH, when brands that people already do business with, and very importantly their dealers, start offering decent range products that could change. Right now there’s really no normal lifestyle EV’s on offer besides Teslas, and that can hardly be considered a conservative or trustworthy brand (not slinging mud, they are just too new and no real local representation).

    Here’s the other thing, EV’s are expensive. Then, you have go and invest in your own home fueling rig to make it begin to make sense (actually not a trivial thing to most people). Then (the kicker) you have to leave your car is odd locations at odd times, often on the private property of a business you have no dealings with, in order to charge up if your daily drive takes any lengthy detours. It’s a big ask, at least until charging stations are gas station ubiquitous, and there will have to be far more of them than that as most people just abandon their cars well in excess of the time needed to charge.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      Great comment; a large dollop of reality.

      They have to make people *desire* EVs and not just by bribing them.

      The vast majority of us don’t give a rat’s about what makes our cars go; we just want them when we want them. Comfy would be a big plus, too.

  • avatar
    GaryR

    I live in a suburb of Vancouver. I can’t seem to leave the house without tripping over a Leaf. Model 3’s are everywhere, and I thought the S’s and Xs were common before. I don’t even notice the PHEVs anymore because they are so prevalent. If I had to guess, based on the number of leafs driving around, they are selling one for every regular “sploder” engined car they sell.

  • avatar
    nwfmike

    Hawaii is a great place to own an electric car if you are making decent to very good money and can afford to rent or buy a house. We have quite a few of all varieties of electric cars. Tesla, Nissan, Toyota, Chevy, BMW, etc. 1 in 100 (+-) maybe? I know it was more like 1 in 10 or 15 when I was driving through the Airport parking lot the other day.

    Maybe we’ll try one when the Rogue wears out, but I’ll hopefully enjoy driving my truck for many years to come.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Here in Vancouver I see several Teslas a day and an I3 or I8 once a week. Therefore I conclude, as rationally as our editors, that EVs are sweeping the land. Given that 38% of Canada’s population live in just the six largest cities, that seems like a far more rational conclusion that a claim based on an area better know for potato farms than urbanity.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    In my condo complex of 400 or so units greenie cars are scarce. This is just west of Portland, and there are everything from elderly widows who have owned here since these were built in 1978, to younger singles and couples who own or rent. My next door neighbor (single mom, late 40s/early 50’s artsy-pseudo hippie type) has that ford minivan ev or hybrid thing and down the street theres a family that has or had 2 priuses. I noticed one took a good whack to the front, and he drove it damaged for a few months but lately I’ve only seen the un wrecked but always filthy one around.

    At my work, they like to flaunt some enviro-wankage. We employ around 2000 people here. Since putting in 4 of those EV chargers 2 years ago (for some reason right up front by the entrance), about 8-10 various types of plugin hybrids and evs have popped up. The thing that really made me laugh is how our ‘green committee’ wrote up these sickenly pompous bio/greenwank profiles for all of the employees who went and bought electric bubble cars (all of the pod/egg variety, only one Tesla owned by a higher ranking exec) complete with pictures of them looking all smug and holier than us knuckle draggers. Apparently we’re all supposed to stand around cooing our approval as we look up to the ‘eco warriors’ as they stand up and set the green example or something.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      This attitude is exactly why I hate EV’s.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        And this other attitude is why I don’t much care for people who hate EV’S. Someone made you feel like a knuckle dragger because you didn’t buy a bubble car? Smells like pasture apples to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Just a guess, but logistically, it’s probably easier to put the charger spots nearer to the building as it probably requires the wiring be run less far, and for less to be dug up/tunneled to accommodate that.

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        Theoretically, that makes sense. But our backup generators are tucked off in a far corner so I know there’s wiring there. Good for logistics, bad for showboating and virtue signals.

        I certainly can’t stand that pompous attitude but that’s just a small part of why I hate EVs and hybrids. A helluva lot of it is the communist policies needed to move the things but for me its the fact that they’re sterile appliances that suck your soul. They are stripped of literally EVERYTHING that makes the cars I love what they are. Fans of eco-mobiles overwhelmingly seem to have a visceral hatred of anything fun. The bland and sterile nature of EVs is what appeals to that.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          MoparRocker74: “Fans of eco-mobiles overwhelmingly seem to have a visceral hatred of anything fun”

          Trust me MoparRocker. The EV driver that pulls next to you at the stoplight, then leaves you behind in the dust when it changes, is having fun. A lot of fun.

          • 0 avatar
            Tele Vision

            @mcs

            The guy in the Alfa Spider is having just as much fun as the guy in the Tesla. I love the noise and vibrations of my MT 6.0L too much to trade it for erie silence and a bit more acceleration – which would kill the EV range in every case. As such: Let’s drive 1000 miles together in our cars and drag race off of every full stop through every town. I’ll beat you by most of a day and have more fun doing so. Until an EV can match that I’m not interested.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          “They are stripped of literally EVERYTHING that makes the cars I love what they are.”

          Rattles, organic solvents, and unreliability? (only trolling a little bit)

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    In Vegas, it appears Tesla sells lots of cars to the folks who used to drive high-end Jag/BMW/Audi. I still see 7-series, but I can’t remember last time I saw a high-end Audi or any Jag at all. I probably see 3-5 Teslas per day.

    On the low end, there’s a smattering of Leafs and 500e. I do see more i3 than either of those. I’ve never seen a Spark, but I have seen several i-MiEV, always to my surprise.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Where I live – Orange County, CA – Lots of EVs of every variety. I own a Volt my neighbor has a Model 3. I work at a large BioMed firm that has 75+ parking slots dedicated to EVs with chargers. There is always wrangling going on to get access to the spots. See every kind there. Model S, X, 3s. BMW i3 (probably rarest of the EVs around here). Chevy Bolts aplenty and a surprising number of Volts. Leafs and a few Honda Claritys
    Once the higher range Model 3s became readily available, they sprung up like weeds.
    75 to 80% of the Fiat 500s I see are the 500e variant.
    EVs may not be practical everywhere but they sure are around these parts.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    I live in a midwestern city with a metropolitan population approaching one million. I know two Tesla Model S owners and have seen one Model 3 on the road. I know the owners of a Chevy Volt and an old Honda Insight. That’s it. If anyone here drives a Nissan Leaf, a Chevy Bolt or a Mitsubishi i-MiEV, I haven’t seen it.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    I live in a fairly nice neighborhood 15 miles from the main city (we call them bedroom neighborhoods), in my cul-de-sac we have 1 Model S, 1 Model 3, and 8 F-150s and several GM SUVs. We all still get together and grill out.

  • avatar
    quickson

    In my area (suburban Dallas), most of the EVs are i3s and Teslas. But the overall makeup is 90% large trucks and SUVs. I see a smattering of Leafs, but not usually in my area. Handful of Volts, a bunch of Prii.

    I don’t think I’ve seen a Bolt in the wild.

    My own neighborhood is in an older mixed community on the edge of West Plano affluence. So between that (beater-to-average) and the surrounding areas (average to Ferrari), I see pretty much everything.

    The nearest car dealerships to me are Ferrari/Maserati, Porsche, Audi, and Mini (to give an idea), so I see more of those than your average bear, too. In the 3 years I’ve lived here, I’ve seen more Maseratis than I did in my entire life prior.

    Overall, even in our urban areas, EVs are a hard sell in Texas. There aren’t many roads below 45mph around here. Long, fast commutes are pretty much the norm. People relocate from all over and say things like “we want to be within 30 minutes of [wherever].” My wife has to tell them that that’s a 30-mile radius.

    When I lived in LA, it took 45 minutes to get from East Hollywood to Culver City (~8 miles). In DFW, it takes 45 minutes for me to get from Carrollton to S. Ft Worth (48 miles).

  • avatar
    dreadsword

    Canadian mid-west reporting in – lots of teslas around, all of which disappear for most of the winter. More than EVs though – hybrids and PHEVs are very common. In this climate, and this community (sprawly, driver focused, lake country) PHEVs make sense where EVs dont.

  • avatar
    DanDotDan

    From Northern Delaware:

    My neighborhood has a couple of Prius Primes.

    In the parking lot at work there’s one Leaf (crunchy granola guy) and a Prius Prime (a guy who commutes from Long Island). There used to be an I3 but I haven’t seen it lately.

    Around town, I see the occasional Tesla.

  • avatar
    hifi

    I live in NYC and drive over 100 miles to a weekend place at the end of Long Island every Thursday night. I own a Model X, and a few ICE cars… a couple being serious European gas guzzlers that sit parked attached to battery tenders. I bought an i3 for my mom because she hates getting gas and maintenance. Yes I know I’m awful and live in a bubble, but I don’t care. There isn’t a pickup or minivan to be found in my entire neighborhood but there are three Teslas on my block of eight homes. My Tesla replaced a Range Rover, and the other two Teslas replaced two S-Classes. Based on observation, the Model 3 appears to already be more common than new Camrys or new Accords in my area. The reality is, I don’t miss the gas station ritual at all. Owning an EV has less to do with what you think of me, and more to do with the features I want and what I want my daily or weekly regimen to be.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Around my winter digs of God’s Waiting Room Floridy (halfway between Ft. Myers and Sarasota) electrics are RARE. The very occasional Tesla, mostly Model S. Even Prii aren’t that common here.

    MUCH more common in my summer habitat of coastal Southern Maine.

    I’d have a cheap used Leaf or eSmart if I still had a daily commute. Electrics make perfect sense to me in that role. But not $35K-$100K electrics. I don’t spend enough on gas to care.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      Port Charlotte/Punta Gorda?
      I’m down here full time for a while – establishing that I am no longer a tax serf (aka tied to the land) of RI.
      Next door neighbor builds some hot cars and sells them. Other next door neighbor has an SUV and a Jeep, plus the occasional family visitor with a bus-sized RV. Have only seen the occasional Tesla and a Volt – no Bolts though.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    A neighbor down the block has a second generation Volt as well as a Bolt. Before the 2nd generation Volt he or she had a first generation Volt. There’s the dedicated charging station in front of her driveway. I see a smattering of Teslas tooling around my area, likely helped by the fact that there is a showroom 20 miles from my commode in Minnetonka.

    The rest of those in my neighborhood, a mobile home community, drive traditional ICE cars in various states of repair. I think mine is one of the newest and least busted on the block.

  • avatar
    raph

    I see two maybe three daily but I wondering how things will shake out once this first generation goes up for the used car market and while this might seem sacrilegious I bet you start seeing the Model 3 and S show up at the local hot spot for street racing.

    EVs might not be quite in the element yet on a road course due to endurance issues they are the ticket for drag racing though.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      It’s already starting, if you’ve ever seen the Teslonda (an early 80’s Accord, very beige, but done up like a gasser except that it’s running a Tesla motor).

  • avatar
    raph

    I see two maybe three daily but I wondering how things will shake out once this first generation goes up for the used car market and while this might seem sacrilegious I bet you start seeing the Model 3 and S show up at the local hot spot for street racing.

    EVs might not be quite in the element yet on a road course due to endurance issues they are the ticket for drag racing though.

  • avatar
    karlbonde

    I have a Fiat 500e EV for slogging to work, and drive my 2005 Benz E55 if I need more range than the Fiat can provide.

    Bought the 2015 Fiat, used with 20k miles for $7,500 last year, still under warranty. Definitely more entertaining to drive than a used Leaf.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Where I live (visualize a box under a bridge) I see brand new cars of any type about as often as I see the latest iPhone – i.e., rarely for both.

    My answer to this question will become relevant in 5 to 8 years.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I live in a suburb west of Minneapolis out by Lake Minnetonka. Tesla’s are pretty common, see them all the time. Then there are few Chevy Volts running around. Not as popular as the Tesla’s but definitely more common than Nissan Leafs. Don’t see enough of anything else to really bother mentioning. In my neighborhood I have the only plug-in. Couple of Prius’s at the end of the street.

    For the millions of multi-car single family households like mine in the US, an EV is pretty much a no brainer. What’s holding them back the most is cheap gas. That’s the reason I picked my Volt up for next to nothing used 3 years ago. I love how the Volt drives in EV mode and plan to go with a full-on EV next. I will always have a BOF V8 4WD truck of some kind to tow my toys.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I see several model 3’s and an S on my commute. Every one of them hangs that left into The Marshall Space Flight Center. They are still vastly outnumbered by not only pickups and crossovers however, but even cars like the Vette and 911 seem to be more plentiful. In my immediate neighborhood I see a model X and my kid’s sad little Leaf in a sea of Pilots and F Series trucks.

  • avatar

    Tesla is actually a common sight here in the Green Leafy Burbs of NYC (Bergen, Westchester, Nassau and Fairfield counties). You have the level of affluence, the desire for “parking lot parity” (snob appeal-keep up with the Joneses) and the commute is short enough for no range anxiety. It’s the car you get when you realize “not another Benz or BMW lease”. Most owners have an ICE vehicle, and a safe place to park with a plug. I considered Tesla but issues with parts backlogs, and the whompy wheels turned me off. I also didn’t like the idea that I was married to Tesla for literally everything, there is no local tech to fix things. I don’t care about auto drive, I’d not use it anyway-no matter who makes it. I could have ordered intelligent cruise in my current car, but didn’t check those boxes, and have no regrets. Still, Tesla has penetration, that, say, Cadillac could only dream about amongst the cool moms and tech dads. Model X has some snob cachet, cause you spent 120k for a family truck.

    • 0 avatar

      As far as others, there’s an i8 someone in town has, see it on nice summer days. Pretty much zero i3, have seen maybe one in the wild. I’ve seen a few Leaf, and battered Prius (along with predictable stickers on the back, no one ever appears to wash them-why ?)

      I’ve seen one or two e-Golf.

      Other than Teslas, pretty much nothing

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The Pittsburgh area is slowly becoming less of an EV wasteland.

    When I got my former Leaf in 2012, I didn’t see another EV until 7 months later. Over the course of that 3 year lease, I didn’t actually meet another EV owner for 2 years. Public chargers were very rare.

    The Ioniq EV I have now is exceptionally rare here because it’s a compliance car not sold in PA. I am unaware of any other, except the used one I test drove but didn’t buy, and which may not still be in PA.

    However, I see Model S and 3s almost every day, and the occasional X, and Leafs and Bolts less frequently. There is even a Mitsubishi i-MiEV lurking somewhere in my zip code. A guy at work has a Bolt, but that’s the only other EV I’m aware of in an office with 700+ people. There is no charging at work, and I’d be embarrassed to use it anyway.

    Having just visited Ukraine a few weeks ago, I was stunned at the prevalence of EVs in that poor country. There were a few S and Xs, but a lot of Leafs, which were often used as taxis/Uber in Kiev. These were all pre-2018 Leafs, so they may be castoffs from the US, UK, or Japan for all I know. And, Kiev’s charging infrastructure isn’t bad.

    But it’s common to see an old Soviet Trabant parked next to an AMG Mercedes, since there is such a big gap between rich and poor there. The car economy there was fascinating – you can get anything you want.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Southern California is EV heaven: abundant infrastructure, mild weather, car culture always up for the new thing. I live in city with a pretty big population of affluent folks. Those who used to buy an S-class now buy a Tesla Model S. Those who used to get a 3-series now buy a Tesla Model 3. Those who used to buy a second-tier luxury brand or a top-trim mainstream brand so as not to look as rich as they are (remember the “noblesse oblige” style of rich people? the ones who would buy Caprice Classic or a 240D in the 80s?) now buy a Chevy Bolt. Loads of hybrids, some plug-in hybrids and EREVs, a smattering of compliance-car second cars (i3, 500e, etc.), and a fair number of fleet Leafs. But for a young family with a modest income in a place where the landlord takes every penny he can, a long-range EV is too pricey, and a short-range EV is too limited. I think it will be a while before the average person even processes that an EV is a possibility for them, let alone seriously shops for one.

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