By on February 4, 2019

The Great Recession of 2009 wasn’t kind to many automakers, a few of whom were forced to jettison brands like the crew of a sinking boat heaving cargo overboard. With a decent level of consumer confidence and continued cheap gas, things are looking up — even as they’re looking down (January results were less than favorable for a few).

Imagine for a moment you could conjure the ability (and the funds) to revive a brand that’s recently departed this landscape. We have four from which you can select — and a brand new way for you to vote.

Beyond the incessant carping that GM should have kept Pontiac instead of Buick (many feel, rightly or wrongly, that keeping Buick around for China was short-sighted, as that market cannot sustain continued exponential growth), you know there must be some tears shed at Ren Cen for the Hummer brand.

Every soccer-toting parent and their housekeeper wants a crossover to park in the school drop-off line these days, not to mention the fact that Jeep is a license to print money for Fiat Chrysler. The latter is such a big deal that those in the know say a main goal at Ford right now is to “beat Jeep”; don’t be surprised to see Bronco become a sub-brand of sorts.

Can you imagine a full line of Hummer vehicles today? They’d sell like proverbial hotcakes. Some sort of halo model, maybe in the visage of a Raptor, followed by a three-row brute and a couple of smaller crossovers — all with the squared and macho styling shown at the top of this post. Like it or not, they’d probably make a mint.

Our other two choices for you are Eagle and Mercury. The case for these are less solid, since the latter would simply hoover development dollars away from Lincoln while the former ended life as a brand with a muddled mission. These days at FCA, Dodge takes the performance reins while Jeep handles off-road stuff. Still, they had a cool logo.

So how about it? Click one of the images below to vote and, since we know you lot like to talk, leave a comment in the section below.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

93 Comments on “QOTD: Ripe for Return?...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I know one guy here who would love to see the Hummer return ;-)

  • avatar
    RSF

    Gotta be Hummer. Seems like GM is leaving a lot on the table by not having this brand going today.

    • 0 avatar
      Ltd1983

      I hated Hummer, and was glad to see them go, but Hummer would be a cash cow for GM if still around.

      No, we don’t need H2’s again, but a simple, rugged “H4” to compete with the Wrangler could be a halo model to get people into the showroom to sell some Blazer or Traverse-based Hummer CUVs to people with more money than common sense.

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Pontiac. Not just because of the likes of the TransAm, but imagine a modern day Aztek. People are falling over themselves now to buy ugly SUVs, with a bit more cladding these would sell as many as they could build.

    Pontiac could’ve teamed up with Holden to keep the V8 sedan alive.

    • 0 avatar
      multicam

      The V8 sedan is alive; not well, but alive. Dodge makes it.

    • 0 avatar
      Wodehouse

      “…falling over themselves now to buy ugly SUVs…” Exactly! Just have a gander at the Hyundai Tucson, Audi Q8 and Toyota RAV4 as examples. Add large obnoxious wheels, more cladding and a giant hatch spoiler and watch the Aztek climb the best sellers list. Hideous is the new normal.

  • avatar
    arach

    EAGLE!

    I chose Hummer at first, but then I changed my vote once I actually thought about it.

    I actually think the market is pretty saturated now with big SUVs, and that the market is on the verge of turning. I should have voted “eagle”. I think Chrysler could do well rebadging and importing cheap but cool cars now that everyone else is vacating the space, and I’m expecting a recession in the next 12-24 months. Why not rebadge mitsubishis or renaults… Both companies WANT to be competitive in the US. Maybe they could even rebadge Geely or Chery, giving them footholds in the US. They could make a killing without having to manufacture a thing.

    I would also argue “saturn” should be on the list and that might be the one that should return… that died after eagle, didn’t it?

  • avatar
    redgolf

    gotta be Pontiac for me since I’m still driving my 97 Grand Prix 3.8 with 178K but you all left out my favorite – Saturn, especially the Vue with the Honda V6 engine/transmission, I’m always looking for a nice low mileage one I can buy!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    For their vehicles – none of them.

    For Mercury’s ads – Jill Wagner.

  • avatar
    jatz

    Studebaker; Starlight CUV.

  • avatar
    sayahh

    Geo. Imagine how many compact sedans GM could still be selling had they not killed Geo and made the Prizm a Chevy. Maybe even a Geo’s version of the Prius, which Toyota apparently was willing to offer to them, IIRC. I doubt Toyota would give them the Camry, though, but who knows?

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Geo was my answer, too, it just wasn’t an option to choose.
      We could get all the rebadged real Japanese Suzukis that we want, including a Federalized Jimny. Add in some cool, funky stuff from other Japanese automakers that we aren’t getting here, and you have a winner. No R&D investment, just tried and true well-built vehicles. Maybe even a mini-pickup (rebadged Mazda BT-50?!). Daihatsu Copen and Boon… maybe, maybe not. But the Chinese would have more difficulties making inroads into our market.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I don’t see what the appeal is to bring back Pontiac or Hummer.

    You bring back Pontiac and we get rebadges of the Trax, Equinox, and Blazer. Best case scenario is a low-volume Alpha-platform car with less compromise than a Camaro. Still, Bunkie Knudsen ain’t walking through that door.

    Same thing with Hummer (although I guess the business case is better here). Probably one dedicated off-road vehicle supplemented by an Acadia Trailhawk and an Encore Trailhawk.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “an Encore Trailhawk”

      Brilliant! Like pink handguns, ka-ching!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Neither is appealing to me, but there’s definitely a business case for Hummer.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      I agree we don’t need a buncha badge-engineered offerings, but they could also sell some cool stuff like the G8, Fiero, Sky (yes I’d rather they bring back the Sky than Solstice, which I always thought looked like Bugs Bunny)….

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      If Pontiac were truly able to spread its wings as an American BMW, something Cadillac has no hope of (and never did), I would say yes.

      But, you’re right, they’d end up being a bunch of rebadged Chevys with questionable styling.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        The ATS and its much bemoaned instrument cluster+good dynamics makes a lot of sense as a Pontiac. Ditto the CTS. Would those two plus a Camaro based firebird be enough to have a brand? Not sure, plus none of those are CUVs so definitely not!

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          No, it wouldnt be high enough volume in a world that shuns cars, but it would be better than Chevy CUVs with “sporty” styling.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          @gtem,

          Per Bob Lutz, a variant of the ATS actually was intended to replace the G6 before Pontiac was shuttered.

          Count me as a Pontiac enthusiast who can’t see a place for them in today’s market.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I miss Mercury – yes they were essentially nice-ified Fords but I liked them specifically for that reason. Not quite Cadillac, but more Buick or Chrysler.

    And of course I miss Oldsmobile and (to a smaller degree) Pontiac as they did have different missions than Chevy, Buick, or Cadillac. The middle-class manager drove an Oldsmobile (like my old man did), while someone who wanted a (often faux) sporty car could pick Pontiac. Chevy just does’t capture that same feeling with me.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I owned three Mercurys and don’t regret it. If you wanted the features, they were a better deal than a similarly equipped Ford. Build quality was a touch better too.

      When they announced the death of Mercury, I thought to myself Ford better step up their game. They did (e.g. the current Fusion was night and day better than the previous Milan). As much as I miss Mercury, they’re no longer needed.

      Olds was better than Buick. Buick didn’t step up their game and give us what we lost in Olds. It’s too bad.

      Pontiac deserved to die by the end. The only thing they had worthwhile was the Solstice, which was bested by the Sky. The car should have lived on as a Chevy.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Why no love for Plymouth? I sure miss that floating power.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      That’s what I came here to say. With Dodge going sporty, Plymouth could sell value models like Journey and Grand Caravan.

      • 0 avatar
        Ltd1983

        A “value brand” makes almost no sense. Why not just sell lower trim Dodges? It’s not like the Dodge brand is so prestigious that the Grand Caravan hurts Challenger sales. Mercedes manages to sell the Sprinter and the Maybach. Who wants to buy a brand known as a cheaper version of an existing brand? It’s never worked. Desoto, Plymouth, Lasalle, etc. People just want the real deal.

        A new Plymouth would just be added costs for dealers, advertising, etc, with no benefit. The current Dodge/Jeep/Chrysler branding is fine. They need to ditch the dumb RAM branding no one outside of industry folks are aware of, and just use the 3 core brands to pop out full lines of CUVs in Sporty/Offroad/Luxury flavors depending on the brand.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I gave the reason in my comment, but here it is again: FCA wants Dodge to be the sporty brand with cars like the Charger, etc.
          Grand Caravan and Journey dont fit that image or mission. Obviously there is demand for them, because they continue to sell very well.

          And which brand should we bring back that won’t “be added costs for dealers, advertising, etc” that may come “with no benefit”?

          It doesnt seem to bother you that there would be added costs to discontinue Ram to make you feel better. They’ve invested millions in making it a separate brand, and they sell very well, but yeah, it would be smart to throw all that away for no reason except to placate those who want everything like it was.

          • 0 avatar
            Ltd1983

            Hummer would add an obvious benefit, it’s an SUV only brand in a time when that is the most popular body style. It would be worth the investment.

            The same investment in Plymouth would not be worth it. No one is not buying a Challenger because it’s the same brand as a lowly Journey. A new Plymouth would need to add sales, not just siphon existing Dodge customers.

            As for RAM, it’s called cutting your losses. A brand exists for consumer recognition. When literally 95% of people still call it a Dodge Ram, it’s not worth the continued investment.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            If Plymouth models were not offered by Dodge, how would that “siphon” sales?

            Gee, Hunny, a Plymouth Voyager or a Challlenger R/T? Cant decide!

            And yeah, Ram is such a loss, since it and Jeep are basically floating the whole company.

            You still dont get that FCA intends for Dodge to be a sporty brand. For example, the Journey is supposed to be replaced by a rebadged and slightly down market Alfa Romeo Stelvio. That would completely leave existing Journey customers out in the cold.

            That means:
            No pickups.
            No value-priced people movers.
            No commercial vans.

            That’s why Ram exists and why they could offer a value brand to sell the models that dont fit that mission. As long as you continue to ignore that fact, you can scream all you want about what horrible ideas these are.

        • 0 avatar
          Ltd1983

          “If Plymouth models were not offered by Dodge, how would that “siphon” sales?”

          1 Plymouth Journey sold would be 1 Dodge Journey not sold. Still just one sale for FCA, but now with more costs.

          Get it?

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            No, I dont “get” it because you’re AGAIN IGNORING THE FACT that Dodge will not offer value models according to FCA’s outline for the brand’s future. Keep on pretending I/they haven’t said that many, many times.

            Oh, and what can Hummer do that GMC cant? Get worse fuel mileage due to blockier styling, and again become the target brand for environmental wackos? That makes total sense.

          • 0 avatar
            Ltd1983

            Creating Plymouth would need to add sales, and you’ve yet to explain how that could happen.

            Even if Plymouth existed just to sell discontinued Dodges, how would that add any sales, rather that just selling those models as Dodges? You keep screaming they’re not going to sell them as Dodges, so create Plymouth. I’m saying; keep selling them as Dodges.

            For your idea to work, either (1) a new FCA customer would need to consider a Dodge (with all their newfound prestige…) that didn’t before because their lineup previously included the Journey, or (2) the draw of a “value brand” would bring new customers into FCA showrooms to buy a Plymouth.

            It’s a dumb idea, and it’s why it’s not happening.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I see logic in the Plymouth idea as a return to value-brand to sell some older but in demand-models (Journey/GC are absolutely prime examples) but I suspect the cost of bringing a brand back (legal, signage, etc, etc) would outweigh the benefit of that logical arrangement. But where does all of this leave Chrysler? They’ve got the Pacifica (great but not-so popular segment), and the old 300, so they too are in a bit of a weird place without a well defined brand or type of vehicle.

        • 0 avatar

          Dodge is Plymouth already. Chrysler just doesn’t have the product lineup to support additional branding. It needs less branding!

          • 0 avatar
            Ltd1983

            If Chrysler made some more CUVs they could justify their existence, but as it stands, you’re dead on. A “chromed up” version of the Renegade, Cherokee, etc to compete with Buick or the other near luxury brands might work for them.

            Oh, and rename the Pacifica back to the Town & Country. T&C still has some cachet, Pacifica not so much.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Dodge is now what Plymouth was and Chrysler combined with Ram now occupy the market space once held by Dodge. One could even argue that Jeep now occupies the more premium space once held by Chrysler.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yes, lets rename everything to confuse customers even further after we spent millions to differentiate models and brands. That will solve all our problems!

            The only time that barely worked was with the Five Hundred becoming Taurus, and most of the B&B think that was a horrible mistake as well.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Hummer, as a direct Jeep competitor, would sell in today’s market. None of these other brands make sense to bring back.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Given the current SUV craze Hummer is the logical choice here and got my vote.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Hummer is the obvious choice for all the reasons stated. The (so far) unstated reason is that no other vehicle makes as much of a political statement as a Hummer. It ain’t my demographic, but there sure is a lot of money to be made selling to it. Consider it the anti-Subaru.

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        Talon Sei drives a lifted Subaru Crosstrek when he’s not building 80% ARs and Glocks. I’m wondering if the image of modern machismo might become a little different than what old people are conditioned to recognize.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Personally I believe it should be Eagle… as long as it retains its identity as an AWD brand across the board–no FWD or RWD-exclusive models. I also think that since Jeep is SUV/CUV country, then Eagle should be sports sedans and wagons as they were originally… And don’t forget the Eagle Talon, which was the Americanized version of the Mitsubishi GT3000. A true sports coupe designed as a roadster instead of a muscle car would offer no competition to the Challenger yet compete well with almost all the import sporters such as the new Celica GT, Nissan Type R and Porsche 911. Full-time AWD would probably see it outclass those others on street and track as well.

    My second choice would be Pontiac, but not as they were when they shut down. Let’s go back to what made Pontiac what it was… four very separate classes of automobile from the sport firebird to the luxury Bonneville and let them all be true coupes–leaving the sedans to the other brands.

    Hummer, after the original HMMMV, was a waste of time and material. Unlike the original, they all used conventional 4WD systems that sacrificed the advantages of the portal axle in order to save cost–relying almost solely on the brand name to survive as long as it did. That’s also why it didn’t survive.

    That leaves Mercury and honestly I liked their cars to a greater or lesser extent. Oh, they were still Fords but they had unique styling that just came across as personal luxury rather than commodity transport. The first car I remember as a kid was my parents’ 1954 Mercury wagon in that deep green color and mock “Woody” sides. They traded it in ’59 for a long, low and wide Oldsmobile Dynamic 88. Now both brands are gone when neither should be.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The Talon was just the Eclipse, but there’s no downside to bringing any of the brands back. Mercury would split the difference between Ford and Lincoln, but yeah Hummer became somewhat of a joke, and I’m sure GM would further embarrass it by slapping the Hummer logo on every minivan and CUV they offer.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Talon and Plymouth Laser were rebadged Eclipses. It’s the Stealth that was a rebadged 3000GT.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “as long as [Eagle] retains its identity as an AWD brand across the board”

      So, they should “retain” something they never were? The vast majority of Eagles were not AWD.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        The Eagles that weren’t 4WD were Ramblers and nobody wants those again

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          The Eagle Premiere was only FWD, as were the Eagle Summit, Medallion, Talon, Vision, et cetera.
          Eagle as a brand is not the same as the AMC Eagle as a model.

          • 0 avatar
            WallMeerkat

            Yep, to me Eagle was a brand for selling Renaults.

            Now they’re FCA, and Fiat are struggling to sell passenger cars even in Europe, I don’t see the business case selling rebadged European passenger cars (eg. Tipo), unless they can team up with Renault again and sell things like Kadjar SUVs (unlikely as Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi are huge competitors)

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @WallMeerkat: Only two Eagle models were Renaults and the Premier was an AMC design sold through Renault dealerships, not the other way around. With that, almost all the rest were Mitsubishi, excepting one that was pure Chrysler.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    None of the above, though I think Hummer could sell a few based on chutzpah. Until the next downturn happens, then the separate branding won’t be justifiable on cost. So no.

    I say Packard from when they made truly fine cars. Lower volume a la Mercedes S-class and up into Bentley territory for their more upscale offerings. Not reaching down to build volume on the backs of “lesser” cars. A place Cadillac and Lincoln aren’t interested in going.

    Truly sweating the details with high expectations for the quality of the components in the car, not cribbing from parts-bins of models with lower standards. Assembly that gets it right without going back to fix paint runs, oil leaks, rattles and wrinkled carpeting. Dealers that treat the owners like the oligarchs, movie stars and captains of industry that they are. Something that is aspirational beyond what rappers and gang-bangers drive. A car that Presidential limousines would be based on.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Not ripe for return, but I always thought it was unfortunate that Saturn got the ax. Admittedly, no frequent car blog reader or automotive “enthusiast” would ever say that. But Saturn still had a little bit of brand equity among non-enthusiasts, a good portion of whom had no idea Saturn was part of GM, or who would have otherwise never considered a “domestic” branded vehicle. Yes they were boring cars for boring people but heaven knows that formula has worked well for Toyota.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    I think Hummer could stand a chance to make money for GM as a premium priced line of SUVs and maybe an SUT. I think they could price them right below or even at Caddy levels.

    I’ve always maintained that it was a mistake for Ford to drop Mercury. It would have been a big help to Lincoln and not a detractor. Fact is that the average L-M dealer did about 50% of his business in Mercurys. In my experience they were on average nicer places than the Ford dealerships and the service in general was nicer than the Ford dealers where Lincon’s now reside. As much as I wish I could buy a 2020 Mountaineer I don’t think that at this point a real case could be made for Mercury to return. The L-M channel isn’t coming back so they would be even more lost and unrepresented than Lincoln.

    Pontiac doesn’t have a spot in today’s market, it was just a different Chevy with no better profit margin potential.

    In hindsight Eagle could have been a contender, alas they were badge engineered out of where they could have could have owned a good chunk of the now mainstream CUV space. Plus Eagle died not because the real purpose was to avoid large costs with shutting down AMC over night. This gave the product for those AMC dealers but hopefully not enough to keep them profitable. At this point I think it would be a distraction from Jeep at best so it should stay in its grave.

    So yeah Hummer is the one that might be worth resurrecting at this point.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Hummer is an absolute no-brainer, Colorado based 5 door SUV, something Tahoe based, and yes a full lineup of CUV derivatives would be a must in today’s marketplace (GM version of Jeep’s Renegade/Compass/Cherokee).

  • avatar
    WisconsinIrishJames

    None of the above. The era of the upscale but not luxury brand is done. They are replaced by the higher trim levels on the mainstream brands, ie platinum trim on Ford, Touring trim on Honda. Only GM with Buick is holding onto a vestige of the recently bygone era, and GM isn’t doing it for North American consumers.

    This is where Pontiac and Mercury fell so it is difficult to see howed they would squeeze in, especially pricing wise. Where would a Mountineer sit between the Explorer Platinum or ST and the base Lincoln Aviator?

    Eagle was mean to be more unique than the Chrysler mainstream brands, but FCA sort of has that with Dodge now. Toyota sort of had a similar run with the now defunct Scion brand.

    Hummer would seem like an obvious choice only to go after the turf where Jeep is dominate. Still, the product would need significant redesign and then you are aiming a more of the niche market for those serious about off road capabilities. There may not be enough customers there.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Hummer and Pontiac, but how about both learn from the mistakes of yesterday. First off, Buick goes to China. Chevy trucks or GMC. One has to go.

    Pontiac is pointless if it’s going to have the same vanilla, snooze mobiles as Chevy with some tarting up. The Holden platform as a coupe (GTO), sedan and that AWD wagon for a more hardcore CUV would be a good start and Id want to see the ute also. A new Solstice could be a good move. That’s it. No retreads from any other division. What Cadillac is TRYING to do with the ATS/CTS would work better as Pontiacs. As to a Firebird from the Camaro…maybe.

    Hummer is likewise pointless if they’re going to be no more than butched up but overweight Tahoes. The H3 and stillborn HX were solid Jeep competition, so I would evolve the current Colorado/Canyon platforms for Hummer. Whichever of the truck divisions remains, it’s going to be focused on mainstream trucks. Hummer gets the offroad focused variants. No fwd based crossovers…those stay Chevies.

    As much as I’d love to see Plymouth return, I just don’t see a real point. Mainstream ‘cars’ just aren’t the bread and butter anymore. There’s nothing that Plymouth could really bring to the table that’s not already covered by Chrysler, Dodge or Jeep.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “Chevy trucks or GMC. One has to go.”

      I dont get this mentality. Both are profitable and both have loyal customers who wont choose the other. I see no reason to discontinue a brand that makes money. Chevy trucks are higher in volume, GMC trucks are higher in profit. No reason whatsoever they cant continue on that path.

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        Im just not seeing it. GMC is to trucks what Mercury, Oldsmobile, Buick, and the stupider Pontiacs were: rereads of what you could get at ford and chevrolet. Just a badge job and some trinkets.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Does it matter? GMC makes money. If Mercury was as profitable as GMC, there is no doubt it would be here today.

          That’s why GMC was spared during The Great Brand Purge. It made money when Pontiac, Saturn, Hummer, Saab etc did not.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            None of GM’s other sub-brands has had the legendary customer loyalty of GMC, buyers option them up, gladly paying more for them than (goofy?) Chevy pickups, which are fine for fleets, and all it takes is a few emblems and a couple cosmetics swapped in.

            But a couple brands needed to be spared, might as well be GMC and Buick. Having an average of 2X the GM dealers (vs Ford, FCA, etc) in every town or city is a great marketing scheme.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Saab- just use the old 9-3 and 9-5 platforms with NEVS electric technology.

    My neighborhood GM dealer in Queens had the Hummer franchise complete with the Quonset hut looking showroom. They also sold Oldsmobile, Pontiac GMC and Saab. Now they sell Buick, Chevrolet and GMC.

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      “the old 9-3 and 9-5 platforms with NEVS electric technology. ”

      The old 9-3 with NEVS electric technology is a thing that is being built, albeit for China.

      GM held onto the 9-5 as it was their then-latest platform.

      Now Saab is just a name, the factory is on the go as NEVS, technically GM could do a BMW-RollsRoyce trick, build a greenfield factory and license the name directly from ‘Saab’ (the parent company who also build aircraft), though as they already had their fingers burnt it would be unlikely.

      Would like to see Saab reunited with Scania under VW group, perhaps selling rebadged Skodas to the US market – see https://sniffpetrol.com/2018/05/02/good-news-for-saab-enthusiasts/ :)

  • avatar

    I like Eagle because I have visions of a new AWD wagon with 3.6 Pentastar to compete with the Outback. But the only choice here from a dollars perspective is Hummer. And as others have said, it would end up as Trailhawk Trax and Trailhawk Acadia, so meh overall even to that.

    Pontiac and Mercury died because there wasn’t enough differentiation to them. That lack of product variance and consumer interest in such has *declined* since 2009, not increased. There’s no hope for things like that any more.

    Chrysler neutered Eagle, so that’s a different story. Assuming they lived longer, more years of DSM garbage wouldn’t have helped things.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I agree that Eagle makes the least sense. There’s no reason for them to exist. A sportier version of the Charger? Lol. Rebadged Mitsubishi’s? Double LOL. Nothing they had in their past is worth revisiting.

      Even an AWD wagon is not a guaranteed success. Subaru only makes it work because of Love, old blind guys and dogs. It’s still redundant and standing in the shadow of their CUVs.

  • avatar
    07NodnarB

    Just none. Not a one.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I agree, we don’t NEED any of them and that’s why they’re not here. If GM would butch-up the Tahoe and bring back the Avalanche there would be no need for Hummer

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Pontiac

    Pontiac-Buick-GMC

    Without Pontiac GMC and Buick are a two legged tripod.

    Pontiac would field three to four vehicles. All would be performance oriented.
    Firebird based off Camaro platform.
    Grand Prix RWD mid-size to large sedan
    Two performance SUV in the spirit of Porsche Macan and Cayenne.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    No Oldsmobile, no care.

    GM should seriously just have some “heritage” models that they introduce for limited runs, and sell them at GMC dealers.

    442. Cutlass Supreme. Rocket 88. K5 Blazer.

    Make them special. Also, give them the old blue GM logo.

  • avatar
    A Scientist

    While I didn’t really shed any tears when it was shuttered, out of all of these I would like to see Pontiac come back. However, I would only like to see it come back if it would be made into the true American BMW fighter the brand could have been. The G8 GXP was oh-so-close. With a little more love (ha!) and attention to detail by GM (LOLOLOL) it could be great.

  • avatar
    ar_ken

    HUMMER Would be the logical choice given the SUV/CUV craze right now. But if it was only up to “for the love of the brand”…. I’d have to say Saab.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Lancia and cashmere sweaters for little dogs.

  • avatar
    raph

    Pontiac would be my pick of the four for all of GM’s sporty sedan and coupe needs!

    Chevrolet could spin off Camaro and Corvette to Pontiac and they could go on to be the entry level division they’ve always supposed to have been. Cadillac can lose the V cars to Pontiac as well and either focus on pure luxury or experiment with the EV lux segment.

    In any event Pontiac could be GM’s Ford Peformance Group or AMG or M or whatever and exist as an adjunct to other dealer operations with thier own line with dedicated floor space and sales people along with specially trained techs.

    I’m sure the low buck performance crowd would caterwaul but they are a dying lot anyway since 25k is the new poverty spec and most of these guys buy used to begin with.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I voted Hummer because GM could make more money on them but they do have a bad reputation as environmentally unfriendly and it might not be worth the bad PR. GM should make Buick a Chinese specific brand, do away with GMC and make Denali the top trim for Silverado, add more crossovers to Cadillac and make it more of luxury and less BMW. It is a waste of funds to bring back dead brands even though some might miss them.

    As for FCA don’t waste funds to bring Plymouth back and just eliminate Chrysler and make the Pacifica the new Dodge Caravan. The 300 is going to be replaced by an electric van and with just the Pacifica left it doesn’t make sense to keep the Chrysler name just rename the remaining Chryslers as Dodges. The real profit is in Jeep and Ram. Remove Fiat from the US market and maybe keep Alfa Romeo for a bit longer adding a compact crossover.

    As for Ford don’t bring back Mercury it is no longer relevant. Keep the Focus in production for a few more years and don’t add any additional crossovers. Keep working on Lincoln because Lincoln seems to be going in the right direction.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    As much as I miss Pontiac and a couple of other brands, there’s no solid way to make money on those brands. The time to do it would have been several years ago, but now they need to sell more of the cars they ARE making right now, not something in the future.

    In today’s environment Hummer is the logical choice, but even then, it would be an uphill battle, against other GM marques and the competition. Even if it makes sense right now, who knows what conditions will change and then we’ll have people incinerating Hummers in the parking lots again. Make the best Chevys, Buicks and GMCs here in the USDM, leave the ghosts of the past alone. Their time has come and gone and there’s no good going to come out of reviving one or any of them.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I loathed Hummer and the people that drove them. The only real “Hummer” is the one sold to Uncle Sam, everything else is a parts bin special. BUT, if GM wants a specialty brand to make money, then bring back Hummer.

    There’s no reason for Mercury or Pontiac to come back. Anything that made Mercury special at one point was completely lost by about 1985. I’d rather see Merkur return if anything!!

    Pontiac only if it can “just” be the excitement division, but not if it’s going to sell another version of the Equinox, Trax or anything else that wears a bowtie, like it did for 30 years. If they just did performance versions of those vehicles, maybe. But not a whole brand.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Rocket: Panasonic, yes, but with completely different technology. Plus, Panasonic seems to be an unhappy partner in...
  • brettc: It’ll probably just be me, so if it does happen I’ll take my time on the way back and make a...
  • SuperCarEnthusiast: Chinese based government backed car firm like they did for Volvo!
  • PrincipalDan: lol… (Used Car Dealer slang: Japanese Buick = Lexus)
  • Corey Lewis: That’s a fair point. I wouldn’t have eaten fast food!

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States