By on February 11, 2019

All hands seemed to enjoy the voting-style poll of last Monday’s QOTD, so let’s try it again. And, yes, if you flake on your choice you can change your selection.

Trying to determine The Next Big Thing in the collector car world is akin to fortune-telling tomorrow’s lottery numbers. Still, it doesn’t stop gearheads from pontificating on which vehicle will be the next to skyrocket in value. We have four choices for you today.

Without doubt, cars like the Fox-body Mustang and A80 Supra have already taken off into the stratosphere, so we won’t mention those. That ship has already sailed.

The fourth-gen Mercedes SL has always held a place with your author, thanks to a combination of teutonic styling and a general sense of gravitas. Known by M-B nerds as the R129, production of this SL technically spanned three decades — 1989 to 2002. Gonzo AMG versions are extremely rare, as are stickshift V6 versions which admittedly reside on the other end of the performance spectrum. After years of being able to pick one up for a (relative) song, I think these convertibles are poised to significantly go up in value. After all, when the valet asks “Which car is yours?” no one has ever regretted saying “Why, my dear man, it’s that big grey Mercedes.”

That’s my pick, but I’ll advance three more. Fox Mustangs are now trading for stupid money, so I believe the halo effect will cause the fabulous Lincoln Mark VII to experience a bump in value as well. Your author deeply regrets selling his 1989 during an ill-advised fleet reduction program.

For the same “halo” reason, Si versions of the fifth-gen Civic are likely to become more valuable, thanks to the money its distant ITR cousin is pulling. Rarity of examples in good nick plays a factor here, since most were either hacked up, hooned to death, or consumed by rust. Weirdo high-mpg VX models might have some appeal, too.

In keeping with the thought that buzz of a new model creates demand for old ones (*ahem Supra ahem*), I think the OJ-style Ford Bronco will soon start commanding as much or more money as the original version from the early ’70s. Check out that “Nite” trim in the hero image up top and tell me that’s not a tasty vehicle.

And, it goes without saying, buying a car solely to make money on it is a terrible idea. We should buy them to drive, not to hermetically seal. Which of these four is your pick for future Barrett-Jackson stardom?

[Image: Ford]
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90 Comments on “QOTD: Future Classics?...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Is anyone else seeing the weird stuff on the poll buttons, like “Tbw8cemffscy74cwjq3h” on the Lincoln Mark VII button? Browser here is Chrome.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    The Lincoln, as I am an old school ‘Lincoln guy’. Of course the LSC is probably already entering ‘classic’ status.

    Are CR-X’s now outrageously priced?

  • avatar
    arach

    I think this question is rigged!

    The only one on there which will have any value is the Bronco IMHO. It will be a hugely valuable collectors car and frankly, already is. Finding one of those restored is already in the high teens and 20s.

    my wife has wanted one forever. I keep looking for them not-rusted out, but any one not rusted out is hugely expensive.

    This seems like an odd mix of cars though. I don’t see any reason why the civic, R129, or Mark VII would have any special collectors value. They weren’t aspirational, didn’t define a revolution, and are insignificant.

    I think cars like the Jaguar XJS are going to be hugely valuable.

    I live in a place where tons of people buy cars when they hit the floor of the depreciation curve, warehouse them, and resell them later.

    I didn’t realize this was a “thing” until I started going to the underground car collector meetings and talked to the guys who do it… then I’ve been to some of their warehouses. They literally buy like 4-10 of each car they identify and SIT on them for 5-10 years and then start selling them off. They keep one of each one, and then 30 years later people are like “I can’t believe you have an original 1969 Camaro”, but they bought it in 1978 for $800… along with 5 more they sold along the way. Its an interesting culture… and there’s a bunch of them doing it… not just a few.

    What they are “hoarding” now were: 3-4 years ago, jeeps, 1-3 years ago 2nd and 3rd gen camaros, 3rd gen corvettes. Today, 3rd gen camaros, 4th gen corvettes, XJS, Maserati Coupes / Spyders (manual only)

  • avatar
    gtem

    I think the author has missed the boat on all of these, as they have all ready all begun to appreciate in value and are already “classics.” An original clean Si with sub 150k would fetch $10k easily I think, likewise the Broncos are $8-12k propositions these days for rust free examples even with some higher miles. MKVII is probably the most undervalued of the bunch at the moment, but most sellers know what they have (to borrow that horribly abused phrase).

    I poked around an awesome red R129 at an exotic car showroom, gorgeous car, I didn’t see the pricetag. I was there looking at a Sienna they had, pretty photos and low miles belied a 5 owner+2 accident history.

  • avatar
    06M3S54B32

    E46 M3. .

    https://www.hagerty.com/apps/valuationtools/2006-bmw-m3

  • avatar
    gtem

    More interesting is what is next in line for appreciating into classic status?

    I predict 1990s SUVs: clean and well preserved 1st/2nd gen Explorer Eddie Bauers, Tahoes, Grand Cherokees. Give it another decade or so. Likewise but even sooner for 1990s pickups, a clean GMT400 already goes for $7-8k for a really nice one.

    • 0 avatar
      TheBestPlaceEver

      +1

      The stuff that people grew up in, that weren’t garage preserved in large numbers and have some creature comforts or off roading ability are usually classics 50 years later.

    • 0 avatar
      0Gravity

      I hope so. We’re still driving around our 19-year old 2000 4Runner with 209k miles on it as a second vehicle. I’m probably going to hold onto it. Can’t get much for it, so might as well hope it ages into a classic. It’s a 5-speed manual; does anyone think that’s better or worse from a classic status? Probably better it’s a manual. It’s still on the original clutch, btw. And yes, I roll every stop sign.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I’m hanging onto my ’96 e-locked Limited, a baby at 151k miles. It’s past the point of depreciation and has appreciated in value even as I’ve driven it from 99k to 151k. I could quite easily get $7500 for it currently selling on the model specific classifieds, not that I’d ever do that! Your 5spd is even more desirable, ’00 was the final year of the stick shifts!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Add to my list ’97-’04 Dakotas and Durangos, just great and purposeful looking designs from Chrysler’s “high” before things came crashing down with Daimler cost cutting.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I’d guess that well preserved examples of 1994 – 2001 Dodge Ram pickup trucks will increase in value.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    I have owned a couple Mark VII LSCs over the years (and also 5.0L Mustangs) and they are indeed wonderful. I think I actually prefer them to the Mark VIIIs, which I also had a couple of. The 8 was just getting a bit ponderous feeling.

    2nd place for me is absolutely the Bronco, and that Nite version is da bomb, as the kids say. At least they said it back when it was new LOL.

    • 0 avatar
      Nikolai

      I always loved Mark VIII growing up, almost bought one as my second car but someone outbid me. I would think the more modern interior and higher powered engine would make it more collectible than the VII.
      So I’m curious since you’ve owned both, why do you prefer the VII?

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        “…since you’ve owned both, why do you prefer the VII?”

        I guess it’s a bit closer to a Mustang, to me, while the VIII (I owned a regular and an LSC) is more like a mid-90s Thunderbird. Oh that reminds me, I also had one of those, with the 5.0L V8. 1992-ish. Straight pipes on that one and was really a great car. It’s tough to say exactly why I prefer the VII, just kind of an overall vibe I get, but it does drive “smaller”, and I love the highly adjustable seats. It really doesn’t feel slower with the 5.0L than the VIII with the DOHC 4.6L, but the VIII will sneak up on you with how fast you’re going. And no doubt the 8 will beat the 7 in a race, but I just mean the perception while driving them. Both have air suspension, which WILL cost you money, but regular spring conversions abound. All of mine had functional air, though. Finally, sound – some mellow Flowmasters on a 5.0L are really tough to beat.

        • 0 avatar
          TCowner

          Having owned a VII and a VIII I also agree about liking the VII better. I find it a much better looking design, it handles so well, and sounds fantastic. However, either one of them are going to drive you nuts finding certain parts (original ABS system on the VII, lighting modules on the VIII) and both didn’t seem as well put together as any Town Car I’ve had.

  • avatar
    GM JUNK

    The last of the GMT400 full size 2-door Blazers should be there. Yes, I said Chevy Blazer.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Anything with a V8 manual will appreciate, they are a dying breed.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I wonder how well the 4th generation SN-95 (1994-2004) Mustang will fare? Not the best looking, IMHO, nor as favored with wrenchers as the previous gen.

    A few years ago a co-worker bought a ’96 Cobra with low miles for something like $10k. He’s since moved on to another company so I don’t know if he still owns it.

    Odd trivia – ’96 Cobra has same HP numbers as the V6 that debuted in 2011.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The ’03/’04 Fox Cobras are absolute monsters and it might be too late to get a clean/low miles one for less than $25K. They have the supercharged 32 Valve 4.6 V8, all forged internals, (USA) Tremec 6-speed, IRS and easily tune and pulley for 500 HP/500 Tq.

      But V6 HP and V8 HP are like two different languages. Also in ’96, 3.73 (rear end) gears weren’t available for V8 Mustangs.

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        “But V6 HP and V8 HP are like two different languages”

        So true – you have to take in the whole picture, factoring in the TQ and the SOUND. Yes the newer V6 Mustangs have the 300 HP, but still not as fun as older V8 examples, ’87-’04, with “only” 225-260 HP. You gotta drive them back to back. And the V8s get more respect on the streets, still.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Right. And they’re not comparing engines to engines either. The biggest disadvantage for older V8 Mustangs is their gear ratios, both in the transmission and rear ends.

          2011+ V8/V6 Mustangs have way more aggressive ratios, plus more gears closer spaced. Older V8 Mustangs with automatics especially suffered.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I think the one to watch is the early 5th generation Mustang. They supply is still large right now so you can be picky about condition and the styling does a good job drawing on Mustang history within 21st century constraints.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Did you say “Boss 302”? Seems like it became a forgotten footnote by the exciting new gen with IRS, flat-plane GT350 and next GT500.

        But I’ve yet to hear of 6th Gen heroes kicking any meaningful ass (M3, R8, etc) around Laguna Seca, VIR, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          Boss will probably become a future classic, it garnered a lot of road course fans and hit the sweet spot for performance with that chassis.

          The only GT500s that will substantially accrue in value will be the 13/14 cars with the 662hp 5.8 since they were the final iteration and highest performing GT500 for that generation.

          I’m not sure about the GT350 in the long run since Ford produced so many of them but on the other hand they do have the 5.2 Voodoo and I suppose when the GT500 rolls out values will take a hit and make them more accessible

          (fingers crossed in any event! My boss was shocked to find out he pays less in property taxes for his 911 than I do my GT350 since VA bases its PPT on NADA loan book valuations and doesn’t account for actual condition or mileage)

          Possibly making them more accessible with the good and bad that comes with it.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Garage queen clean/original Broncos (and Bronco IIs) should be The Next Big Thing since finding one not lifted with the fenders cut up for bigger wheels/tires (original wheels long gone), body painted with bedliner with the dash/interior all cut up, is already tough.

    Similar could be said for original Civics.

  • avatar
    stereorobb

    classic car market in 2030…

    1. Nissan 240Sx – its a car that everyone already wants now. i think in another ten years a pristine unmolested example will command insane money

    2. older honda civics, and preludes – popular tuner cars all of which have been hooned to death

    3. anything made by Acura in the 80s/90s

    4. the Lexus LS400 – was a very important car historically. it was over engineered, turned the market on its ears, and set the standard for the modern luxury car. they are also very cheap now and have plenty of power, so they are very much on the radar for the hoon/drift/stance crowd. the first gens are already just about extinct. the SC300/400 will also go up in price

    5. Infitini G35 coupe. -who DIDNT want a fire engine red G35 coupe in 2005??

    6. Infiniti M45 (first gen) clean lines, lots of power, and they didnt make very many of them. 03-04 only

    7. BMW M anything.

    8. 02-05 BMW 745Li bangle Butt. -why? because it was radically different then really anything else on the road at the time, scorned and deeply hated much like the edsel was in its time, any car that can create that much emotion good or bad, will be important in the future i think. plus horribly unreliable and many have died a quick death. wont be many left

    9. late 1990s Ford Explorer – most of them were killed in COC. people will want them

    10. other early first gen japanese SUVs like the Isuzu Trooper, Toyota 4-runner, nissan pathfinder

    11. Audi TT – these things were cool when they came out. no way you can deny it

    12. Mercedes AMG anything, 300Es, 190Es, 400Es, SL etc

    American Cars..

    1. Box Chevy Caprice. these will be looked at tomorrow like the 64 impala and the 57 chevy before it. in ten years you wont be able to touch one under 10 grand. mint low mile examples from the early/mid 80s will command stupid prices

    2. early post fox body mustang cobras and GTs

    3. Chrysler Crossfire – cmon, they were cool.

    4. late 1990s Ford Explorer – most of them were killed in COC. people will want them

    5. 2004 Mercury Merauder

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      >>late 1990s Ford Explorer

      Rare, but I still see some rusted 90s Ford Explorers and Mountaineers still toolin’ around here in Michigan.

      >>Chevy Caprice

      Due to the donk / big rims thing, these do command a lot more money than one would expect. Not quite under $10k but still good money. Especially in rust-prone Michigan.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        2nd gen Explorers are thick on the ground in poorer parts of Indianapolis, but to find a truly well preserved non-rusty one takes some work.

      • 0 avatar
        stereorobb

        give it another 10-15 years on the box chevy. those and really all the other full size box sedans of the 80s like the crown vic, merc marquis, etc. last of the true full size chrome bumper old school american cars

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          clean box Bs are already climbing, a clean coupe is easily a $8k car, good sedans seem to be in the $5k range and up. Conversely no one seems to really care too much about the boxy panthers, not yet anyways.

      • 0 avatar
        CaddyDaddy

        Whale B-Body, clean, unmolested and rust free, like mine :). Sorry, but I really don’t see the overall collectability of Asian manufacture cars. There is no pedigree of this phenomenon. They have always been appliances with no appeal. I also don’t get the appeal of the VW Combi???

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          You see a aero B-body (Impala SS aside) as being any more collectible than any number of more interesting cars just because they’re of Asian origin? Quite a dim view of things. How is something like a Supra more of an appliance than a Caprice?

          • 0 avatar
            CaddyDaddy

            ….. it’s not the point of origin (Asia). I would say most people who buy Asian make cars (most are manufactured in the USA) are looking for a reliable from Point A to Point B machine. Those are not the properties that = collectibility. As far a Supra meh…. Aero Caprice with an LT1 with all the option boxes checked, oh ya! Sweet Ride. I guess we will have to wait 20 years and re-visit the state of the market.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            You realize that the vast majority of ALL consumers just want a “reliable from Point A to Point B machine” right? That’s why Toyota and Honda built up into such mammoths in the US and why the domestics suffered such crippling losses in market share. Granted the Japanese over the last 2 decades have been cranking out perfected mediocrity with very few sporty or offroad models, but the 90s was chock full of neat stuff from everyone (Mitsubishi’s Galant VR4, Montero with seat suspension and adjustable shocks, Honda’s Integras/Preludes/Civic Sis, Toyota’s 4wds, Supras and MR2s and stunning LS400, Nissan’s 5spd VQ30 maxima, 300ZX, pathfinders, etc).

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          Regarding collecting Asian cars, the people who wanted to buy specific models when they were young can now afford to buy them while the people who wanted American muscle cars before them are ageing out of car collecting. I’d guess that the higher performance and the luxury brand Japanese cars would be collected while the 4 door family cars wouldn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I only see a few sedans becoming classics, most actual vintage sedans are still fairly cheap even in running shape.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I will second the G35 (even if I hate the VQ’s exhaust note at anything less than full song), but also the 350Z. I’m not sure which is more likely to be fully used up in 20 years though, with the Z being even more ripe for abuse, but also more likely to be a weekend toy.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    The Nite is so right

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    ” OJ on line 3″.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Love those Lincolns. But a car that should be here is the 2nd-gen Lexus GS. There’s a lot of Supra DNA in that car and you won’t pay anywhere near Supra cash, at least right now.

    • 0 avatar
      stereorobb

      agreed, the 2GS, especially the GS400 (with the 1UZ) from 98-00 is a brutal car that could eat most 5 series and e classes at the time. the GS300 not so much. the 1GS had more of the supra DNA but those are almost extinct.

      the 3GS deserves a nod as well. ive never been a fan of them but they had some insanely rare configurations rarer than any LFA, like the 2007 GS430 NOT the 06. most people dont know the GS430 was also available in 07, and the GS460 was an absolute monster that even some people at the dealership dont think ever existed. the true unicorn is the 2011 GS460. a scant 52 produced.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Pontiac G8 GXP with minor celebrity status to the G8 GT and the Chevy SS.

    The G8 GXP is basically collectible now.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Yep, Fox Mustangs. I’m always looking.

    I REALLY regret selling my beautiful deep jewel green metallic 91 LX 5.0L notchback, 5 speed, factory 3.08 gears. That green, those shiny stainless steel dual exhaust pipes, that SOUND.

    Some others:

    Lexus SC400
    Supercharged MR2
    Turbo MR2
    Celica All Trac
    Integras, especially GSRs and Type Rs
    VTEC Preludes
    1990-1993 Accord Coupes, peak Accord

    • 0 avatar
      cognoscenti

      nels0300 absolutely nails it. The unicorn Integra Type R that auctioned (Barrett-Jackson) for $63,800 is a bellwether for the increasing value of the largely disposable Japanese cars from when Toyota and Honda still had mojo. The fact that they were mostly disposable means fewer survivors, especially unmolested. Plus, most of them were analog and direct in feel, and that makes them a joy in today’s era of digital disconnect.

      I’d also like to add the BMW E90 M3. Last of the V8 sedans, last of their cars with hydraulic steering, last of the BMW’s not to pipe fake engine sounds through the car stereo. Total US/Canada production over all years was 5867, and if you narrow that to manual transmission cars only, you get 3135. Make it a Competition Package, and you only have 1220. Pick any less common color (i.e. not white/silver/grey/black), and you get down into the low hundreds or less.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Try to find a manual SC300. These are MKIV Supras for the mortals that cant afford the Supra.

  • avatar
    stereorobb

    classic car market in 2060…

    cars today probably wont hold up as well as they did in the past, but who knows. ill be like 80 if i even live that long, but if i do, heres what i think Gen Y will want apporaching retirement..

    1. Lexus anything F branded especially the IS-F, and the LC500. maybe the 2013-2017 LS460 as it was the last “real” lexus LS that had a v8,but also looked cool

    2. Infinity FX35 and QX56

    3. early mid 00 nissan maximas, sentras and Altima SE-Rs, Juke NISMO.

    4. mid 00 Acura TSX -fun to drive, peppy, cool looking, and currently being hooned and destroyed by the rice crowd

    5. Acura ZDX – a weird confused car that never really figured itself out, but was kinda cool looking and unique, plus not too many made really

    6. Honda Insight – the weird little hybrid that nobody had but looked better then the prius

    7. Honda Civic type R

    8. Honda Odyssey – everyones mom had one. they will have a sense of nostalgia to them and will make Gen Y feel warm and fuzzy, comfort car from childhood if you will.

    9 Mitsubishi Lancer EVO and all other Lancers

    10. last gen Mitsubishi Eclipse -not the Xover

    11. Volkswagen W8 passat -already rare as hens teeth

    12. Volkswagen Phaeton W12 -filed under obscure weird luxury cars that everyone forgot about

    13 Volkswagen CC -just have a feeling about this one

    14. anything BMW M. M5 and M6 being the most wanted. the 650Ci will also be up there

    15. BMW i8 if any still exist -they are cool as hell cant deny it

    16. Benz anything 55 AMG but not so much for the 63 AMG, like the CL55, CLS55 will be very desirable

    17 Audi S anything, however the R8 and RS6 will have the most love

    18 Hyundai Genesis coupe as well as the V8 sedans

    19 Hyundai Veloster -cause it was weird

    20 Kia Stinger & Forte and the K900

    American Cars..

    1. Chrysler 300c Hemi -already on the list as “Future Hooptie” but by 2060 will be restored and cherished

    2. 2nd Gen 2011’ish Dodge Charger Hemi, Challenger of all types, Rt, Hellcat, Demon etc -the Dodge Charger is really the VERY LAST true, everyday american middle class full size RWD v8 sedan. think about that..

    3. Caddy DTS Deville, CTS-V, XLR, STS, MAYBE the Escalade truck

    4. Pontiac GTO, G8, solstace

    5. Oldsmobile Aurora coupe

    6. Chevy SS

    7. Ford Taurus SHO 2 gen

    8. Ford neo-retro mustang, but 2gen not 1st gen

    9. Ford new thunderbird -that briefly made weird one that looked old

    10. Lincoln LS-v8

    11. Lincoln Zephyr not the MKZ

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Heck, in 2060 I’ll just be thrilled if it’s still legal to operate an ICE vehicle without any AV tech.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      Rob, I know of no Aurora coupe…..
      ……but glad I own a vintage Odyssey if it’s gonna go up in value – maybe I won’t follow the current plan to let one of my about to be driving kids tear it up :)

      • 0 avatar
        stereorobb

        about 15 years ago someone i knew had one and it was already a little dated. i remember it being black on black and had all kinds of gizmos in it. i swear the damn thing even had navigation. it was really fast sounded good and was fun to throw around. car had ALOT of grunt. very very well executed car just at the wrong time as it was too little too late for Olds. couldve swore it was a 2-door. pretty sure it was man. ive never seen another one. then again that was ages ago so maybe remembering wrong….

        biggest killers of them is FWD and northstar blow up box engine

        • 0 avatar
          dividebytube

          The old man had a ’99 Aurora that he bought new and only sold last year. Only 110k miles on the clock; it still drove fairly well when traded in on a new Equinox (!!).

          The interior was a little cramped but still felt more roomy than a lot of modern cars. The 4.0L Northstar wasn’t exactly a barn burner but not bad for the era. Lots of gimmicky buttons and a computer that could tell mileage, trip, oil life, etc – stuff that we take for granted now. It did ride nicely and I always enjoyed the time I had behind the wheel.

          I had to borrow it almost three years ago when my vehicle got totaled in an accident so I had a few weeks remembering the “old days”. I suppose the modern equivalent is the Chevy Impala or the Buick Lacrosse?

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      Any Cadillac with a Northstar will be worthless. They will be like Chevy Vega’s…. All Northstars die early and are relegated to the junkyard as too expensive and complicated to rebuild. It’s not like you can do an engine swap with an SBC. Fodder on the trash pile of Automotive history.

      • 0 avatar
        Weltron

        If so many Northstars die early, then why are there so many still around?

        Not to mention, if you are a mechanic, and you can’t rebuild a Northstar, you probably should not be working on a car. They’re not exactly rocket science. The solution to it’s problem exists. They’re actually reliable motors otherwise.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I’m impressed at the resilience of the later (early 2000s and up) Northstars, and frankly I see more than a few of the gen 1s around as well, usually belching some oil from the quad exhaust tips but still trucking along.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Any of the iconic Japanese cars from the late 80’s to mid 00’s with any sort of vague performance aspirations will be sought after by the Gran Turismo generation. They are the 60’s muscle for millennials. This generation of Civic has been a tuner darling for so long and handles so great out of the box that values for unmolested examples will be getting ridiculous very quickly.

    As I’ve said on here before, look at the car list for the original Gran Turismo, and tell me that any of those cars (with the exception of the Demio, Mirage and Primera) aren’t going to be future classics. Even the vast majority of the Gran Turismo 2 list (which expanded up to 550 cars) are going to be good investments.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I can’t vouch for or against it, but some people are convinced that Volvo 240s have recently become classics. Why I have no clue, beyond their decline in numbers over the past 5 years.

    Otherwise I try to avoid predicting future classics since most just dont make sense to me. I grew up with little love for my generation of cars (1990s).

  • avatar
    brn

    The Bronco already is a classic. You see them all the time in movies, but they’re impossible to find for sale. Did a search for 300 miles from Minneapolis and found exactly one, asking $25,000.

    Given their scarcity, I get upset every time I watch a movie where they beat on and / or destroy a Bronco. Sure, $20K isn’t a huge sacrifice for a $100,000,000 movie, but stop destroying such wonderful vehicles!

  • avatar
    carguy67

    Bet in a couple years, when the initial rush of sales tapers off, Ford offers the ‘OJ Edition’ Bronco. It’ll be white, and speed limited to 55MPH.

    Says the guy who’s owned two Bullitt Mustangs.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Forgot another one:

    1992-1996 Camry SE V6 5 speed manual.

    You could get a coupe or a sedan.

    For a car that sells in the hundreds of thousands, this trim level was super rare.

    Best Camry generation ever made, silky smooth 24 valve V6, manual transmission, what’s not to love?

    • 0 avatar
      stereorobb

      yup. those are rare. much like the 5-speed manual Lexus ES300 from 1993. ive only seen one in the wild. the ES300 was one of the most misunderstood cars of the late 20th century.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I had a ’96 I drove for a little less than a year, higher miles (209 when sold) but in good shape. Brick Sh*thouse of a car, unbelievably sturdy and high quality, a tank on bad roads. Mine was an auto, of course, which fit the overall feel of the car well and was a marvelously smooth transmission. But a 5spd would have really woken the car up and could really let the 1MZ show its true potential.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      After college I got to test drive a used 1992 Toyota Camry V6 with a 5-speed. For the time it felt quite fast and I was going to pull the trigger on it but ended up with a ’94 Nissan truck; something that I was familiar with. Since my dad was co-signing the loan, he thought the slower vehicle was the better idea.

  • avatar
    scott25

    The Mark VII is doomed to remain a cult car because it has absolutely zero appeal to females. The other three all appeal to women in different ways, as does almost every classic car ever made, but the Mark VII only appeals to the guys who visit this site and think Panthers and 3800s are cool.

  • avatar
    stereorobb

    hell truth be told i really didnt give much of a shit about 90s and early 00s cars till recently. kind of the last “real” cars before computers totally took everything over. you had 1 or 2 ECUs, not 15. you had actual keys not fobs and im sorry, a push start will never feel as good as clicking a key. 90s-early 00s cars also gives me a little sense of nostalgia. im an early millenial (born 1984) and these are the cars i grew up with and came of age in. in the late 90s you know what every kid in high school was driving? some honda civic or CRX, always already a bit riced even back them, Box Chevys were another staple in the high school parking lot. Box Chevys on 20′ rims and some kind of boom system. i had one in mine lol. my circle of friends drove old S10 trucks, my best friend had a black Plymouth Laser that was already hooned and beat to death when he had it 20 years ago. the cool kids drove 318Is and 190e mercedes. one of my girlfriends had a volvo 240. they were just what everyone had in high school that were parents or grandmas hand-me-downs. old ford tempos and 1st gen Tauruses were other popular ones. -i cant ever remember the last time i saw an 80s Taurus let alone a Taurus wagon.

    i drove something totally different tho during my 1st year between 16-17 in Y2k. being a totally unpractical car guy like most of us are that think about cool looking and fun to drive and everything else goes out the window lol, my first car was a rusty old mint green 1955 Pontiac Star Chief. why? because obscure classic car nobody ever heard of with a V8 and tail fins and you know what? it could just about desecrate everything that my friends had. used to eat fart can hondas all the time, and could run circles around a box chevy caprice. everyone loved that car. wish i still had it now. i was a young stupid driver that had just got his licence and wanted to do burnouts, power slides and race everyone. ended up totaling it. damn….

  • avatar
    oldguy

    Mazda 6 wagon, Acura TSX wagon.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    They’ve always been desirable as project vehicles but single cab shortbed pickups…especially sports and special editions. As family oriented crewcabs become ubiquitous, the old school classic style pickups are getting rare. And as the smallest, lightest body style, that’s how you make the most of a strong engine. The ones to REALLY watch will be the Ram SRT-10, as well as the Rumble Bee and Daytona editons. The Ford Lightning already has a following. Silverado SS…I dunno. The extracab body style and awd system don’t make for a sporty sport truck.

    Id expect the Trailblazer SS and any V8 Grand Cherokee to become valued, same with the 4Runner and FJ Cruiser. Any 2-door sports utility will be sought after for style.

    Anything RWD/V8 will always have a followiny. The Mopar LXs won’t soon lose popularity, but the Hemi Magnum and Chrysler SRTs are what I would watch VERY closely.

    It’s a bit of a longshot, but I think PT Cruisers and Chevy HHRs with turbos will be ones to watch. Doubly true of manuals.

    If hybrids and electrics get rammed down our throats, I’d expect serious blowback, making pretty much any pure ICE vehicles immediately desirable.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    I have a hard time believing that any of the Chrysler LX chassis cars, no matter how cool they can be (Hellcat, anyone?) will manage to significantly appreciate. They just made WAY too many of them. They are still making way too many of them today.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I agree, and this isn’t the 60s where people might be ignorant of collectible value. Thousands of these cars, plus Vettes, Camaros, Shelbys, etc. are being babied and stored away in the hopes of a future payday. Demon aside, I just don’t see it.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      They made a lot of the first generation of Mustangs and Camaros too. That, along with being solid easily upgraded platforms us exactly why they’re desirable. As ‘cars’ are disappearing, and appliance grade CUVs and worst of all electrified vehicles are gaining traction, expect to see interest in a back to basics visceral type of car go on the rise.

      I said it before but the money maker LXs will be Hemi Magnums and SRT 300’s. Rarest of the bunch. Demons, Hellcats and whatever is coming next will definitely be on the radar but everyone sees that coming.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Any generation of unmolested V8 stick shift, Camaro, Mustang, Challenger .. Extra points for Mustang and Camaro convertibles .

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    I quibble with the 5th gen Civic Si – it’s the 5.5/6th gen ’99-’00 Si coupe that will (and does) command high prices. The 5th gen simply is woo weak (and hatchback) to mean anything.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      I like the hatch aspect actually, but man that coupe version is OFT stolen!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I’m the opposite, I’ll take the 5th gen’s looks and interior over the 6th, and at a cost of reducing originality, if I really craved more power, a B16 or B18C swap is like legos with these things. For daily driving, the D16Z6 in the 5th gen Si is still a very fun zippy motor.

  • avatar
    Weltron

    1) Oldsmobile Aurora
    2) Chevy K5 Blazer
    3) 1994-2001 Dodge Rams

    The Blazer we are already seeing appreciate in value, much like the Bronco. The Aurora and Dodge were trailblazers in terms of styling for the times, and even today. Even the new Dodge pickups still have the basic “cues” from the 1994 design.

    The Aurora IMHO, is the most beautiful car of the 1990’s, if not of the past 30-40 years. The design and engineering was ahead of it’s time. They still stand out in traffic to this day.

  • avatar
    manu06

    Mazda Miatas and the BRZ and FR-S. Not sold in large numbers and both available in a stick .
    Older, low mileage examples of the Miata aren’t hard to find and haven’t been riced out usually.

  • avatar
    wayneoh

    I owned a 2000 Mustang GT for about 4 years. I put on a catback exhaust system and a cold air kit. Even with the automatic, it was a blast. And the sound of the 4.6 with exhaust upgrade is sweet.
    Still see bunches of the new edge GT’s around Central Florida. I think they will follow the Fox Mustangs in value increase soon.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    Lincoln Mark VIII. These things, even in nice condition, are super cheap. I’d jump on a facelifted LSC.

    Mazda 929 if you can find one.

    Last-gen Ford Thunderbirds/Mercury Cougars.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I’m obviously partial to the MN-12 Thunderbird/Cougar and Mark VIII but her are some others:

    95-99 Buick Riviera-The final Silver Arrow edition ought to be collectable.

    Chevrolet Trailblazer SS and its cousin the Saab 9-7x Aero.

    Chevrolet HHR SS- Standard Ecotech turbo

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    I still keep wondering when first gen RX-7s will be worth something, but I don’t see it happening. Sad, that was the best car I ever had. I think early Miatas are suffering the same fate. I think the succeeding years of RX-7s and Miatas got steadily better, so nobody wants to step back to the earlier cars. Some day they’ll be worth something.

    Now that ’68-72 Chevy C10s are hot and getting all bought up, squarebodies are starting to get attention. I think if you want to be ahead of that curve, GMT400s are well styled and better quality. They’re not even remotely collectible right now and dirt cheap.

    I can remember when Ford almost ditched the Mustang for the Probe. They followed with the SN95 Mustangs, which were both modern and a throwback design. I think the S197s made us forget how much of a throwback the SN95s were. I didn’t like the New Edges when they came out, but they’ve grown on me. Dirt cheap right now, and teenagers are driving them to extinction.

    V6 Altimas. There’s an entire generation that knows these are sleepers. They’re going for peanuts. Running driving examples are selling for scrap metal prices.

  • avatar
    BamaDogman

    Porsche Macan Turbo w/PP
    Audi R8 Spyder
    Plymouth Prowler
    Chevy SSR

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    The Bronco and the Lincoln are sure bets………..no doubt about it. The Honda will probably be based on it’s original popularity and reliabilty then the love(if you want to call it that) that the youth have for it in later days. Sadly that same youth have rendered most Honda’s useless because of all the mods that they do to these little gems(i had a 91 civic sedan and it’s my favorite bar none)if there are any around in 20 years…………they will be classics!!

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    oh and the Merc will be also just based on numbers produced only.

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